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This profile was last updated on 4/17/14  and contains information from public web pages.

Sir Henry S. Robinson

Wrong Sir Henry S. Robinson?

Creator

Red Rider
 
Background

Employment History

  • Head Engineer
    York Mills
  • Owner
    Brymbo Iron Works
  • Assistant Engineer
    Hamilton Manufacturing Co.
  • Engineer
  • Navy
16 Total References
Web References
TheThunderZone.com - Artwork by Thunder : Meet Thunder
www.thethunderzone.com, 17 April 2014 [cached]
The art work of Hal Robinson, the creator of Red Rider, Miraculous Mutha' and the righteous products guy, set the foundation for what would become our communities version of political and periodical cartoon satire. In the late 70's, Supercycle magazine (god how we miss that one) introduced the art work of a young artist by the name of Don "Thunder" Baggett who took over doing the strip "White Line Willie" . I have been a big fan of the W.L.W. strip for as long as I can remember and when I got the chance to talk to Thunder about how he came into the biker art world, it was a real privilege. Thunder told me that he's not a man of many words but during our hour long phone conversation he painted a mental picture for me that I doubt I would be able to pass along in this short article. Starting off as young as he could remember, art was always his bag. Thunder quit high school over the issue of not getting his hair cut and from there finished his senior year through the University of Alabama. While there he took plenty of art classes and entered the college curriculum at the age of 17. From there he finished 6 quarters at Patrick Henry Jr. college in Monroeville, AL. where he obtained his associates in art degree all before the early age of 19. Growing up in Alabama, Thunder found his first gig in Birmingham working for an entertainment paper called "Birmingham After Dark.
...
Hal gave Thunder a lot of direction with his art and is still today the inspiration to keep doing what he loves. Much of the work he does today contains messages and signs of the times that might get over looked by the quick glance, but if you take a minute and really look around in the strip you'll pick up the little things. It might be graffiti on a wall, an emblem on a gas tank, the lettering of a tire or someone's T-shirt, but the important things always come out somewhere in his work. Take this month's Low Down & Dirty Rotten for instance.
Civil War « The Blanchard House Blog
andoverhistorical.org [cached]
Henry Robinson's Odyssey: The Diary of a Civil War Soldier (4)
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By 1862, Henry had been married for nine years and had three children.
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This notable omission notwithstanding, Henry was probably happy to return to domesticity after being away for so long in the Navy and on business for his brother.
Henry's wife and potential insurance beneficiary.
Henry threw himself into household tasks that had been put on hold while he was away. He "hoed the garden," "put down parler[sic] carpet," and "put down sitting room carpet. He also bought straw, backing, chain, fencing material and a toothbrush. With all his purchases, Henry appeared poised to spend a few more weeks tending to his home, but it was only six days until the transient Henry left home again.
Henry's oldest child and only son, born 1857.
Before returning to Clinton on the 16th, Henry chose to "[send] an application for money of 2500 dollars life insurance. By taking out a life insurance policy, it seems that Henry was cognizant of the high death toll of the war and perhaps already contemplating enlistment. $2500 was a significant amount of money in 1862, depending on how you convert it, it would be somewhere in the vicinity of half a million dollars in today's money.
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In all likelihood, the policy Henry is trying to take out would only cover him if he were killed while not in the line of duty.
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Tags: Civil War, Diary, Henry Robinson, Life Insurance
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Henry Robinson's Odyssey: The Diary of a Civil War Soldier (3)
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After a week hiatus, Henry Robinson resumed his journaling on June 7th.
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After meandering his ways through the shipyards of the Union, Henry is finally home and back at his civilian occupation: being a mill engineer. Nowadays, becoming an engineer requires four years of college and a bachelor's degree. Henry's engineering education did not conform to modern requirements.
Henry was born and reared on the shores of Lake Winnipesaukee in what is now Laconia, New Hampshire. He attended the local schoolhouse and then Gilford Academy before leaving home in 1847 at the age of 16 to become an assistant engineer at Hamilton Manufacturing Co. in Lowell, a company known for their bright calico fabric. 158 years before the Hamilton mill was turned into 65 loft-style apartments, Henry learned the intricacies of steam engines here.
A label that was attached to every bolt of cloth sold by the Hamilton Manufacturing Company of Lowell, where Henry was Assistant Engineer from 1847-1849.
It didn't take long for Henry to move up the ranks; in 1849 he became the head engineer at York Mills in Saco, Maine, one of the largest cotton milling complexes in the country at that time. He stayed employed in Maine until 1855, when he moved 100 miles south to Clinton, Massachusetts to join his brother as a consultant engineer.
His brother was James Ramsey Robinson, the J.R.R. who Henry loaned three dollars to and went "on business for".
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Henry worked for James, apart from his stints in the military, until 1864.
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It was during this fraternal partnership, in June of 1862, that Henry went to this mill "below the Spicket" to examine and fix two boilers-Munroe's and Her's. The job took Henry nearly a week's work to complete.
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A Corliss Steam Engine, not unlike the kind Henry might have been repairing the boiler for in Lawrence in 1862.
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Henry's work with boilers foreshadowed his later success: Henry would go on to found Robinson Boiler Works after the war, a very profitable company which made boilers for many of New England's mills.
Share
Tags: Boiler, Civil War, Diary, Henry Robinson, Lawrence, Mill, Steam Engine
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Henry Robinson's Odyssey: The Diary of a Civil War Soldier (2)
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Henry Robinson continued his diary on May 28, 1862 as he traveled up the eastern seaboard:
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An 1863 sketch of a Union shipyard from Harper's Weekly, similar to the shipyards Henry Robinson visited.
At the outbreak of the Civil War, the Union Navy was underequipped.
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The region that bore the grunt of this massive shipbuilding boom was exactly the corridor Henry was traveling through-the coastline from Baltimore to Boston. In his travels, Henry was stopping and examining many of the major shipyards and producers. In Baltimore he went to Abbott's Rolling Mill, which produced the iron plating for the U.S.S Monitor, the first ironclad ship in the Union Navy. In Chester he went to Reaney, Son & Archbold, which built dozens of Navy ships and was an early producer of ironclads. In Philadelphia he went to Neafie & Levy, which had just finished building the first U.S. Navy submarine. In New York he saw the Roanoke being converted to an ironclad at Novelty Iron Works.
The U.S.S. Flag, the ship Henry Robinson served on during his time in the Navy.
The question is, why was a consulting engineer from Clinton, MA on a trip examining naval facilities? It turns out that Henry Robinson was actually in the Navy for a brief amount of time. In light of this, his interest in shipbuilding and naval engines comes as no surprise. Henry enlisted as an Acting Third Engineer on September 17, 1861. Third Engineers were the most junior of engineers aboard and therefore were given the most menial tasks. He served aboard the U.S.S. Flag while patrolling the coasts of South Carolina. He resigned from the Navy on May 12, 1862 and his appointment was revoked on May 22. Baltimore was most likely the port in which Henry resigned, which explains the reason for this trip.
An envelope addressed to Henry S. Robinson during his time serving on the U.S.S. Flag.
With his enlistment in the Army three months later, Henry would become one of the few Civil War soldiers to have served in both the Army and the Navy during the war.
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Tags: Civil War, Henry Robinson, Navy
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Henry Robinson's Odyssey: The Diary of a Civil War Soldier (1)
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This is the first entry in the diary of Henry S. Robinson, a Civil War soldier and future resident of Blanchard House. He was born in 1831 in New Hampshire and spent much of his antebellum life in Maine, where he was married in 1855. He worked as an engineer both before and after his time as a Lieutenant in the Massachusetts' 36th Regiment Infantry. In 1885, he moved to Andover and lived here until his death in 1912.
The diary begins three months prior to his enlistment, with Henry ostensibly on some sort of business trip in Baltimore:
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Seventh Baptist Church in 1910, as Henry Robinson might have seen Dr. Fuller preach in during his 1862 trip to Baltimore.
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It is fitting that the first entry in the diary is a report of a battle because, even though it would be another three months before Henry would be actively involved, the Civil War was omnipresent. In early 1862, the war was going poorly for the Union.
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In everything Henry did and everywhere he went in Baltimore and the surrounding areas, nothing was untouched by war. The Abbott Rolling Mill was one of the foremost producers of iron in the Union. Most famously, they made the armor for the Monitor, the first ironclad ship in the U.S. Navy. As Henry notes, Pusey and Jones helped build the USS Juniata, which helped enforce the Union's naval blockade of the Confederacy.
Henry attended two different churches on the 25th, a Presbyterian one and Dr. Fuller's Seventh Baptist church.
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Green Mount Cemetery, where Henry spent the afternoon, is now a popular sight for Civil War buffs to visit. It is the final resting place of both Union and Confederate generals, and John Wilkes Booth.
On the 27th, Henry escaped some of the turmoil and took the first step in his journey back to New England. The next time he would cross the Mason-Dixon Line, his trip would have a very different purpose.
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Tags: Civil War, Diary, Henry Robinson
The Chain Bridge
llangollen.org.uk, 7 April 2012 [cached]
It survived until 1870 before needing a complete refurbishment by another famous engineer Sir Henry Robinson, owner of the Brymbo Iron Works.
Diary « The Blanchard House Blog
andoverhistorical.org [cached]
Henry Robinson's Odyssey: The Diary of a Civil War Soldier (1)
...
This is the first entry in the diary of Henry S. Robinson, a Civil War soldier and future resident of Blanchard House. He was born in 1831 in New Hampshire and spent much of his antebellum life in Maine, where he was married in 1855. He worked as an engineer both before and after his time as a Lieutenant in the Massachusetts' 36th Regiment Infantry. In 1885, he moved to Andover and lived here until his death in 1912.
The diary begins three months prior to his enlistment, with Henry ostensibly on some sort of business trip in Baltimore:
...
Seventh Baptist Church in 1910, as Henry Robinson might have seen Dr. Fuller preach in during his 1862 trip to Baltimore.
...
It is fitting that the first entry in the diary is a report of a battle because, even though it would be another three months before Henry would be actively involved, the Civil War was omnipresent. In early 1862, the war was going poorly for the Union.
...
In everything Henry did and everywhere he went in Baltimore and the surrounding areas, nothing was untouched by war. The Abbott Rolling Mill was one of the foremost producers of iron in the Union. Most famously, they made the armor for the Monitor, the first ironclad ship in the U.S. Navy. As Henry notes, Pusey and Jones helped build the USS Juniata, which helped enforce the Union's naval blockade of the Confederacy.
Henry attended two different churches on the 25th, a Presbyterian one and Dr. Fuller's Seventh Baptist church.
...
Green Mount Cemetery, where Henry spent the afternoon, is now a popular sight for Civil War buffs to visit. It is the final resting place of both Union and Confederate generals, and John Wilkes Booth.
On the 27th, Henry escaped some of the turmoil and took the first step in his journey back to New England. The next time he would cross the Mason-Dixon Line, his trip would have a very different purpose.
Share
Tags: Civil War, Diary, Henry Robinson
“Thunder” Art | "Push'n Pavement"
www.pushnpavement.com, 18 Aug 2010 [cached]
The art work of Hal Robinson, the creator of Red Rider, Miraculous Mutha' and the righteous products guy, set the foundation for what would become our communities version of political and periodical cartoon satire. In the late 70s, Supercycle magazine (god how we miss that one) introduced the art work of a young artist by the name of Don "Thunder" Baggett who took over doing the strip "White Line Willie" . I have been a big fan of the W.L.W. strip for as long as I can remember and when I got the chance to talk to Thunder about how he came into the biker art world, it was a real privilege. Thunder told me that he's not a man of many words but during our hour long phone conversation he painted a mental picture for me that I doubt I would be able to pass along in this short article. Starting off as young as he could remember, art was always his bag. Thunder quit high school over the issue of not getting his hair cut and from there finished his senior year through the University of Alabama. While there he took plenty of art classes and entered the college curriculum at the age of 17. From there he finished 6 quarters at Patrick Henry Jr. college in Monroeville, AL. where he obtained his associates in art degree all before the early age of 19. Growing up in Alabama, Thunder found his first gig in Birmingham working for an entertainment paper called "Birmingham After Dark.
...
Hal gave Thunder a lot of direction with his art and is still today the inspiration to keep doing what he loves. Much of the work he does today contains messages and signs of the times that might get over looked by the quick glance, but if you take a minute and really look around in the strip you'll pick up the little things. It might be graffiti on a wall, an emblem on a gas tank, the lettering of a tire or someone's T-shirt, but the important things always come out somewhere in his work. Take this month's Low Down & Dirty Rotten for instance.
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