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Wrong Hal McKnight?

Hal McKnight

Chairman

Oklahoma City Trails Advisory Committee

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Web References(25 Total References)


2008 April - Kansas Cyclist News

www.kansascyclist.com [cached]

Hal McKnight, chairman of the Oklahoma City Trails Advisory Committee, says that as more trails are built people are beginning to view them as more than just recreation.


Kansas Cyclist News | The web's premier site for bicycling in the state of Kansas. - Part 94

www.kansascyclist.com [cached]

Hal McKnight, chairman of the Oklahoma City Trails Advisory Committee, says that as more trails are built people are beginning to view them as more than just recreation.


www.okgazette.com

Hal McKnight, chairman of the Oklahoma City Trails Advisory Committee, was a member of the April 16 panel, along with former City Councilman Sam Bowman and Bob Berry, president of D.C. Bass & Sons Construction Co., of Enid.
As the former owner of local bike shop Wheeler Dealer Bicyclesfor more than 35 years, McKnight is a proponent of multiuse trails. "As multiuse trails become part of the consistent tapestry of a city, as they are made accessible to the public, overall health increases," he said. "As Oklahoma City talks about bringing new businesses into the metro, it's important to know that overall public health strongly determines where businesses locate. That is measured in part by multiuse trails, parks, walkability, commuting options, etc. Increased traffic on public trails also means increased public safety, due to the number of people out and about. Studies indicate they also lead to an increase in property values." McKnight said the majority of Nichols Hills residents he spoke with recognize the importance of connecting the trails, but money is a factor. "There is no funding right now," he said. "However, most people realize it's a good thing when the benefits are explained to them." Until the funding is in place, McKnight said Planet Nichols Hills will focus on increasing public awareness of how the trails can help improve the overall health of a metro area that McKnight said "does not do well on public health scores."


www.okgazette.com

Hal McKnight, chairman of the Oklahoma City Trails Advisory Committee, walks the North Grand trail with his black lab, Will. Photo/Mark Hancock
"I think that this is certainly going to move us forward," said Hal McKnight, chairman of the Oklahoma City Trails Advisory Committee, who said he is a "huge" proponent of MAPS 3. "This next set of trails is going to make a huge impact. … I think we need trails within every part of the city." McKnight said the city needs to have a trail system that will benefit children and adults, as well as making it possible to commute to work and run short errands on a bicycle. "I think we're talking both quality and quantity through this (almost) 60 miles of trails," he said. "I think it's really important from the health and wellness standpoint to build as many trails as possible. … The more trails, the healthier we will be." He also said the master plan needs updating. "I can see where there is confusion," McKnight said. Several miles of trails from previous bond issues are funded and coming on line. McKnight calls the newly opened Katy trail along the abandoned Katy railroad right-of-way "gorgeous" and lined with huge trees. It runs from the Remington Park area near the Oklahoma City Zoo south to the Oklahoma River. The Deep Fork Greenway will run from close to Bishop McGuinness Catholic High School and connect the North Grand trail to the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum, and the Central Greenway near the Fort Smith junction, which will connect the Katy trail to the Oklahoma River. "We also have a bicycle transportation plan that was part of the 2007 bond," McKnight said. He also said 120 "Share the Road" miles are funded, which would create bike lanes on existing roads. Another 330 miles are planned. "I think it's really important to the community," he said. photo Hal McKnight, chairman of the Oklahoma City Trails Advisory Committee, walks the North Grand trail with his black lab, Will. Photo/Mark Hancock


www.okgazette.com

Wheeler Dealer Bicycles has been in business in Oklahoma City for more than 35 years, and owner Hal McKnight said he's never seen a surge in new bicyclists like he has the past two years.
CONTIGUOUS NETWORK LONG-TERM STRATEGY "Many of them started riding last year when the economy took a downturn," McKnight said, "but many of them have found that their physical and mental well-being improved, so they've kept riding." McKnight is also the chair of the Oklahoma City Trails Advisory Committee, a group that includes Ward 2 City Councilman Sam Bowman, Ward 3 Councilman Larry McAtee and several trails enthusiasts. The committee is attempting to generate support for the upcoming vote on MAPS 3, a proposal that McKnight said will greatly improve the bicycle friendliness of Oklahoma City. The vote on MAPS 3 is scheduled for Dec. 8. McKnight said the vote is important both for the overall health of Oklahoma City and for the city's future. "Cities either evolve or dissolve," he said. A 2000 bond issue funded five trails, including the newly opened Katy trail, which McKnight calls the prettiest trail in the metro. The trails in MAPS 3 will cost approximately $40 million, and McKnight said the money is an investment in Oklahoma City's health and growth. "The money allows us to create a healthier city," he said.


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