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2011-02-16T00:00:00.000Z

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Background Information

Employment History

Professor In the Department of Cellular and Integrative Physiology

Indiana University Medical School

Member, Department of Cellular and Integrative Physiology

Indiana University Medical School

Professor, Cellular and Integrative Physiology

Indiana University , Indianapolis

Education

Ph.D

Web References (6 Total References)


Hypertension, insulin resistance and immune suppression links .: The Library

www.candidalibrary.org [cached]

H. Glenn Bohlen, a professor in the Department of Cellular and Integrative Physiology at Indiana University Medical School, wrote in an accompanying editorial in Hypertensionthat the new study will likely be important to people suffering from obesity as well as hypertension.

"With the national and international emphasis on obesity and its attendant cardiovascular problems, there is a tendency to forget that essential hypertension affects about the same percentage of humans as does serious obesity and an even higher percentage of the population than does type 2 diabetes mellitus," wrote Bohlen.


H. Glenn Bohlen of the ...

in.news.yahoo.com [cached]

H. Glenn Bohlen of the Department of Cellular and Integrative Physiology, Indiana University Medical School, wrote that 'with the national and international emphasis on obesity and its attendant cardiovascular problems, there is a tendency to forget that essential hypertension affects about the same percentage of humans as does serious obesity and an even higher percentage of the population than does type 2 diabetes mellitus'.


"This is really an important ...

www.scheart.com [cached]

"This is really an important observation," said H. Glenn Bohlen, a professor of cellular and integrative physiology at Indiana University Medical School, who wrote an accompanying editorial."It ties in information that high blood pressure and insulin resistance have the same cause, damage to receptors."

The function of proteases in rats and humans is the same, so what has been seen in the laboratory rats likely occurs in people."It probably happens in humans on a different scale," Bohlen said."Rats live at a different metabolic rate, much faster than in people."
The newly reported studies might also help explain why antioxidants such as vitamins C and E help against inflammation, he said.
"The next approach probably would be to treat an inflammatory state," Bohlen said.
...
SOURCES: Frank DeLano, Ph.D, research scientist, department of bioengineering, University of California, San Diego; H. Glenn Bohlen, Ph.D, professor, cellular and integrative physiology, Indiana University, Indianapolis; June 30, 2008, Hypertension, online


H. Glenn Bohlen, a professor ...

ww.biologicalprocedures.com [cached]

H. Glenn Bohlen, a professor in the Department of Cellular and Integrative Physiology at Indiana University Medical School, wrote in an accompanying editorial in Hypertension that the new study will likely be important to people suffering from obesity as well as hypertension."With the national and international emphasis on obesity and its attendant cardiovascular problems, there is a tendency to forget that essential hypertension affects about the same percentage of humans as does serious obesity and an even higher percentage of the population than does type 2 diabetes mellitus," wrote Bohlen.

...
"Even if future studies only support the clear linkage of hypertension to insulin receptor cleavage in the current study of SHRs, this observation should lead to many studies of how these two problems perhaps interact," wrote Bohlen in the Hypertension editorial.


"This is really an important ...

www.gulfbend.org [cached]

"This is really an important observation," said H. Glenn Bohlen, a professor of cellular and integrative physiology at Indiana University Medical School, who wrote an accompanying editorial."It ties in information that high blood pressure and insulin resistance have the same cause, damage to receptors."

The function of proteases in rats and humans is the same, so what has been seen in the laboratory rats likely occurs in people."It probably happens in humans on a different scale," Bohlen said."Rats live at a different metabolic rate, much faster than in people."
The newly reported studies might also help explain why antioxidants such as vitamins C and E help against inflammation, he said.
"The next approach probably would be to treat an inflammatory state," Bohlen said.

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