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Wrong Guy Johnson?

Guy Johnson

Superintendent of Indian Affairs

Massachusetts House of Representatives

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Massachusetts House of Representatives

Background Information

Employment History

Superintendent

Indian Affairs


Agent

His Majesty


General Haldimand, Governor

Quebec


Web References(99 Total References)


Louis Cook: A "Colonel" of Truth?

www.wampumchronicles.com [cached]

Contrary to the report given by Louis, the British had indeed gained inroads among the Seven Nations and the Iroquois Confederacy, thanks to their Superintendent of Indian Affairs, Guy Johnson, and Daniel Claus.



wendysmithtoronto.com

Wabakinine and other leading Mississauga chiefs and warriors were summoned to Fort Niagara in early 1781 by Colonel Guy Johnson, who had succeeded his uncle Sir William Johnson in 1774 as British Superintendent of Indian Affairs (colonies department).
Indian Superintendent Colonel Guy Johnson at Niagara to General Haldimand, Governor of Quebec, at Quebec City, 9 May 1781: Sketch of a Tract of Land purchased of the Mississagas for His Majesty by [Colonel] Guy Johnson at Niagara the 9th May 1781 by order of His Excellency General Haldimand. Archives of Ontario (RG 1-A-1-1 , Vol. 1. p. 67). To All Persons whom these presents may concern, We the Sachems and Chiefs of the Chipeweighs & Missisagas, Inhabitating at and near Weghqueta at the Head of Lake Ontario In the Vicinity of Niagara on behalf of oursleves and all our people here convened by Colonel Guy Johnson, His Majesty's sole agent, and Superintendant of the Six United Nations of Indians, and their Confederates, send Greeting.


Indians and the American Revolution

www.americanrevolution.org [cached]

The role of the American Indian during the American Revolution was a shadowy and tragic one, symbolized by Benjamin West's painting, now in the National Gallery of Art, of Colonel Guy Johnson, the British superintendent of Indian affairs in the North, and Joseph Brant, the great Mohawk warrior.
While arguing in council to forestall Iroquois involvement in Dunmore's War, Johnson on July 11, 1774, died and was succeeded by his nephew and son-in-law, Guy Johnson. Guy Johnson was relieved when, in a series of conferences culminating in a great meeting at Onondaga in October 1774, the Iroquois decided to ratify the pledge to remain at peace with the English and to persuade the Shawnees to settle their differences with the Virginians. In explaining the growing crisis to the Iroquois at a conference in January 1775, Guy Johnson asserted that: By the fall of 1775, General Gage, the British commander, would use Washington's actions to justify his orders to Guy Johnson and John Stuart (who had succeeded Atkin as superintendent of Indian affairs for the southern department) to bring the Indians into the war when opportunity offered. As a Seneca warrior put it, in reply to the warnings against the Americans made by Colonel John Butler, who acted for Colonel Johnson in the latter's absence: Meanwhile, in July 1776, Colonel Guy Johnson and Joseph Brant, the Mohawk, had returned to New York from a visit to England.


www.americanrevolution.org

Colonel Guy Johnson and Karonghyontye (Captain David Hill), 1776
Colonel Guy Johnson and Karonghyontye (Captain David Hill), 1776


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