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Wrong Guy Johnson?

Guy Johnson

Superintendent of Indian Affairs

Massachusetts House of Representatives

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Massachusetts House of Representatives

Background Information

Employment History

Agent

His Majesty


Affiliations

Indian Affairs

Superintendent


American Philosophical Society

Member


Web References(101 Total References)


Louis Cook: A "Colonel" of Truth?

www.wampumchronicles.com [cached]

Contrary to the report given by Louis, the British had indeed gained inroads among the Seven Nations and the Iroquois Confederacy, thanks to their Superintendent of Indian Affairs, Guy Johnson, and Daniel Claus.


USA Wholesale reproduction of oil painting c011

www.intofineart.com [cached]

Colonel Guy Johnson (mk08)
Colonel Guy Johnson (mk08) -- WEST, Benjamin Colonel Guy Johnson Colonel Guy Johnson -- Benjamin West Colonel Guy Johnson Colonel Guy Johnson -- Benjamin West


The Life of Gouverneur Morris, by Jared Sparks, Page 41 | Colonial Hall

colonialhall.com [cached]

Indian disturbances on the frontiers.---Guy Johnson's letter and the reply of the Congress.--Intercepted correspondence of General Gage.--Preparations for military defence.--Project of the Congress for a conciliation with England.--Mr.
Hardly had the Provincial Congress convened, when intelligence was received of threatened troubles with the Indians on the frontiers, through the influence of Colonel Guy Johnson, superintendent of Indian Affairs, who resided in Tryon county. He wrote a letter to the mayor and corporation of


Christian Daniel Claus

www.ns1763.ca [cached]

Sir William Johnson died suddenly on 11 July 1774 and was succeeded in the department by another son-in-law, Guy Johnson.
On 11 November 1775 Claus took passage to England in company with Guy Johnson, Joseph Brant [Thayendanegea], and others seeking the cancellation of Carleton's arrangements. The final period of his career opened with his appointment in August 1778 as a deputy agent for the Six Nations in Canada, subordinate to Guy Johnson. Several factors were involved.


Sir William Johnson

www.ns1763.ca [cached]

As superintendent, Johnson negotiated the land deal between the prospective purchaser and the Indians, and at least from 1771 he had the permission of the Six Nations to set the price of their land.
The territory he acquired for himself was not insignificant. He accepted a 130,000-acre [52,600-hectare] grant from the Mohawks of Canajoharie (near Little Falls, New York). For £300, New York currency, he bought about 100,000 acres [40,000 hectares] on the Charlotte Creek, a tributary of the Susquehanna River though as a result of boundary limits set by the Fort Stanwix agreement of 1768 he was obliged to abandon his purchase. In 1765, less than three months after a treaty had been concluded with Pontiac, designed in part to allay Indian fears for their land, Johnson purchased some 40,000 acres [16,000 hectares] from the Oneidas. In all this he acted no differently from dozens of other speculators in Indian lands. He was distinguished only by the great advantages he possessed through his office and through his long intimacy with the Indians. He was indeed one of their principal exploiters; his actions speak louder than any words of his. He was a typical imperial servant, in an area where he had few competitors able to match his intelligence and interest - an almost unbeatable combination in the 18th century. Johnson was a man of some intellectual curiosity, and he amassed a substantial library of books and periodicals. On occasion he purchased scientific instruments. In January 1769 he was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society, but he never went to its meetings. He also belonged to the Society for the Promotion of Arts and Agriculture and to the board of trustees of Queen's College (Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey), though he never attended its sessions. There is no evidence that Johnson ever married. In his will he acknowledged as his wife Catherine Weissenberg (Wisenberg), an indentured servant who had escaped from her New York City owner. He took her in in 1739, and by the time of her death in April 1759 they had had three children.


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