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Gregory Heisler

Teacher

Hallmark Institute of Photography

HQ Phone:  (413) 863-2478

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Hallmark Institute of Photography

241 Millers Falls Rd

Turners Falls, Massachusetts,01376

United States

Company Description

Hallmark Institute of Photography offers an accelerated path for you to enjoy a successful career as a professional photographer. Our ten-month program dedicates forty percent of our courses to the business and marketing of photography. We host 20-30 guest l... more

Find other employees at this company (39)

Background Information

Employment History

Portraits


Distinguished Professor of Photography

Newhouse School, Syracuse University


Distinguished Professor of Photography

Syracuse University


Owner

Heisler Pictures Inc.


Guest and Master Instructor

Vancouver Photo Workshops LTD


Teacher

Gulf Photo Plus LLC


Instructor

Santa Fe Workshops


Artist

Bernstein & Andriulli


Photographer

Santa Fe Center for Photography


Teacher

International Center of Photography


Web References(195 Total References)


Beginners Photography Courses Archives - Better Photos 101

betterphotos101.com [cached]

Hallmark Institute of Photography Course: Location Lighting with Gregory Heisler


Beginners Photography Courses Archives - Better Photos 101

betterphotos101.com [cached]

Hallmark Institute of Photography Course: Location Lighting with Gregory Heisler


news.syr.edu

Photographer Gregory Heisler teaches students at Newhouse.
Photographer Gregory Heisler teaches students at Newhouse. That impressionable young student was professor and photographer Gregory Heisler. And lucky for countless admirers of his profound body of work-and now the Newhouse School-Heisler did not take those words to heart. His love of photography was just too great, Heisler says, and he forged ahead, building a career that is widely admired and celebrated today. And no wonder as Heisler has shot more than 70 covers for Time magazine and his work has appeared in countless other publications. So at the end of the summer of 2014 Heisler and his fiancée moved to Syracuse from Western Massachusetts, where he'd been working part time as a professor at the Hallmark Institute of Photography. During his first two weeks here, Heisler bought a historic house in DeWitt, got married and started at Newhouse. "I was a photographer who teaches," he says. Talk with Heisler about what and how he teaches, however, and you won't hear phrases like "good pictures" or "bad technique. Instead he sounds more akin to a coach or even a yoga teacher. "(Students) have to bring something to the party but it's my job to get them very excited and super duper interested and curious and make them want to work twice as hard as they've ever worked before," he says. Sure, Heisler is working to ensure his students understand how to use their cameras-and how to create and control light-but more importantly, he wants them to be inspired by their photos. Their pictures should communicate a message, both from the photographer and from the subject. The work should tell a story, not just look good, he says. Heisler says he wants his students to love photography. If they love it, everything else has the potential to fall into place, he says. "You have to be passionate about it," he says. And Heisler's office, on the top floor of Newhouse 1, decorated in bright orange carpeting, classic cameras and historic photos of and by Heisler favorites, is a revolving door of students seeking his help and advice. Heisler says he has tried to expose students to what the real world will be like after graduation. He encourages students to focus on what they love, and that making a living will follow. "It's a little surprising how worried the students are about what's next," he says. For that reason, Heisler has opened his Rolodex for students. He has arranged for many field trips to New York City to meet with prominent photographers, and students say he's a wealth of knowledge and networking. And that photography advice Heisler received as an impressionable college student so many years ago still resonates. It's why he tells students just the opposite: keep at it, keep working, photography is very much alive and well. "That's what's cool about now," he says. "There are many, many, many possibilities and you just want people leaving (Newhouse) thinking it's possible and they can make it happen." Raising the bar Heisler's position on the Newhouse faculty is no accident. Strong, who runs the MPD department, was a student of Heisler's at the first-ever Eddie Adams Workshop nearly 30 years ago. "When I tell people, photographers, that Gregory Heisler is one of my professors, they either want to go to this school immediately or their jaw just drops and they say how the hell is he teaching there," Erlebacher says. To know Heisler is to know his amazing photography and now, his passion for teaching. But those who really know him also note his fun, goofy personality. During one of his first visits to Heisler's office, Erlebacher says he asked his professor about a tiny camera on one of the shelves. Erlebacher asked how the camera could even hold film and Heisler encouraged him to pick it up and examine it more closely. "I'm hoping forever," Heisler says.


aphotoeditor.com

Gregory Heisler Interview
Gregory Heisler has spent the last quarter century photographing covers for magazines like Time, Sports Illustrated, and Life. In 1994, he was famously blacklisted from the White House press corps for shooting a double exposure of President George H.W. Bush ("The Two Faces of Bush") for Time's Person of the Year cover. Since then, Heisler, now 58, has seen photography shift from film to digital and magazines switch from staff shooters to freelancers. Since 2009, he's been teaching portraiture at the Hallmark Institute of Photography, in Massachusetts. Gregory: It's like camera school-vocational school. Gregory: At the workshops there'd be a little more theory and a little more emphasis on the philosophy of it. Gregory: It's kind of a color week, the emphasis is on color, so we're going to be looking at color from the subjective point of view as opposed to the objective. Gregory: The emphasis is more on working with light in ways that are expressive. Not big deal lighting stuff with huge strobes. Gregory: Yes. Gregory: I was shooting lots of large format portraits then but I've since changed to digital, where you have so much more control. Gregory: That was actually shot with a Hasselblad and strobes, which contradicts everything I just said. Gregory: That's probably true. It's such a funky camera. Gregory: That's a very accurate perception. These days it might be someone like Platon who might have a very specific look or style for the pictures that he takes and that's something that people want. Gregory: Yeah, it is. Gregory: You kind of figure out every picture from scratch, which is not to say I never do pictures that I've done before-but I really try not to. Gregory: Those would be them. Gregory: Sometimes day, sometimes not until you're walking into the room. Gregory: I think they all suck. Gregory: Dan Winters worked with me for awhile about 20 years ago. Gregory: No I think it's gratifying. It's awesome! Gregory: My brother used to say some people have an "inferiority simplex. It's not that they're under the delusion that they're inferior; they actually are inferior and they secretly know it. I think that's what those photographers are like. They're very jealous. Grayson: What about your work flow? Gregory: It varies with the client. Gregory: Well yeah, in the case of Lebron, it was kind of done. We had five or ten minutes with him, but we'd spent the better part of the day messing with lighting, so as soon as he walked in it was good to go. Gregory: That's a funny one. Gregory: No. Gregory: Yeah, I pretty much put a clothespin on my nose and took a plunge. Gregory: Yeah, there are a lot of decisions to make, creatively. Now, with digital, you can really be the author of your own work. From the beginning to the end of the process, you control everything. Note: We've partnered with Santa Fe Photographic Workshops to interview several of their instructors for upcoming workshops that we find interesting. If you want to join Gregory in Santa Fe for "The Evocative Portrait" go (here). Also, there are plenty of other photographers like Mr. Heisler who are quietly and expertly working. It's refreshing to hear the humility and honesty of Mr. Heisler when he says, "I think they all suck. Having recently graduated Hallmark and had Greg as a teacher, I am still hanging on his every word. Greg Heisler has forgotten more about photography than the vast majority of people know exists. Thanks for sharing, and thanks Mr. Heisler for being so open! When you think about it, the circle is unbroken for Arnold Newman, whom Gregory was an assistant for, was asked the same question years ago and I have heard the same answer come out of Arnold's mouth. "Gregory: No I think it's gratifying. It's awesome! Greg gave me the reason to move from Sydney to NY in the eighties, and start assisting.. as soon as I saw his pictures during the first "Day in the Life" series (Australia), and later, so many more like jewels on the lightbox, combined with his overwhelming enthusiasm, I was instantly hooked. Ended up working often day and night, the film days, remember.. in and out of the labs at all hours, etc. But the great thing was this.. his understanding of the subtlety of light, and the endless testing, on every format, to arrive at particular distinctions, stamped his images with qualities still unique. So it was a journey that has fond memories, as all his past assistants would verify, some of the funniest times, from a photographer who puts his heart and soul into the work, demanding more than anyone I worked with, of the process and those involved, yet and obviously still with an undiminished generosity, made a shared journey unforgettable. Like this.. when I quit to start shooting, a gift of 100 rolls of Kodachrome (with processing). If all the assistants could put together the shared times and events into a book of working with Greg, it would be a sellout biography.. Heisler is an inspiration to us all.


www.aphotoeditor.com

Gregory Heisler Interview
Gregory Heisler has spent the last quarter century photographing covers for magazines like Time, Sports Illustrated, and Life. In 1994, he was famously blacklisted from the White House press corps for shooting a double exposure of President George H.W. Bush ("The Two Faces of Bush") for Time's Person of the Year cover. Since then, Heisler, now 58, has seen photography shift from film to digital and magazines switch from staff shooters to freelancers. Since 2009, he's been teaching portraiture at the Hallmark Institute of Photography, in Massachusetts. Gregory: It's like camera school-vocational school. Gregory: At the workshops there'd be a little more theory and a little more emphasis on the philosophy of it. Gregory: It's kind of a color week, the emphasis is on color, so we're going to be looking at color from the subjective point of view as opposed to the objective. Gregory: The emphasis is more on working with light in ways that are expressive. Not big deal lighting stuff with huge strobes. Gregory: Yes. Gregory: I was shooting lots of large format portraits then but I've since changed to digital, where you have so much more control. Gregory: That was actually shot with a Hasselblad and strobes, which contradicts everything I just said. Gregory: That's probably true. It's such a funky camera. Gregory: That's a very accurate perception. These days it might be someone like Platon who might have a very specific look or style for the pictures that he takes and that's something that people want. Gregory: Yeah, it is. Gregory: You kind of figure out every picture from scratch, which is not to say I never do pictures that I've done before-but I really try not to. Gregory: Those would be them. Gregory: Sometimes day, sometimes not until you're walking into the room. Gregory: I think they all suck. Gregory: Dan Winters worked with me for awhile about 20 years ago. Gregory: No I think it's gratifying. It's awesome! Gregory: My brother used to say some people have an "inferiority simplex. It's not that they're under the delusion that they're inferior; they actually are inferior and they secretly know it. I think that's what those photographers are like. They're very jealous. Grayson: What about your work flow? Gregory: It varies with the client. Gregory: Well yeah, in the case of Lebron, it was kind of done. We had five or ten minutes with him, but we'd spent the better part of the day messing with lighting, so as soon as he walked in it was good to go. Gregory: That's a funny one. Gregory: No. Gregory: Yeah, I pretty much put a clothespin on my nose and took a plunge. Gregory: Yeah, there are a lot of decisions to make, creatively. Now, with digital, you can really be the author of your own work. From the beginning to the end of the process, you control everything. Note: We've partnered with Santa Fe Photographic Workshops to interview several of their instructors for upcoming workshops that we find interesting. If you want to join Gregory in Santa Fe for "The Evocative Portrait" go (here).


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