Need more? Try out  Advanced Search (20+ criteria)»

Last Update

is this you? Claim your profile.

Wrong Greg Zacharias?

Greg L. Zacharias

Chief Scientist

Air Force

GET ZOOMINFO GROW

+ Get 10 Free Contacts a Month

Please agree to the terms and conditions.

I agree to the  Terms of Service and  Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Grow at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

THANK YOU FOR DOWNLOADING!

computers
  • 1.Download
    ZoomInfo Grow
    v sign
  • 2.Run Installation
    Wizard
  • 3.Check your inbox to
    Sign in to ZoomInfo Grow

I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Air Force

Find other employees at this company (108,227)

Background Information

Employment History

Chief Scientist

United States Air Force


Affiliations

National Research Council

Member of the Committee On Human Factors


Research Advisory Board

Board Member


Langley AFB

Member of the Air Combat Command Advisory Group


Charles River Analytics Inc

President


Education

PhD

Aeronautics and Astronautics

MIT


PhD

Aeronautics and Astronautics

Massachusetts Institute of Technology


Web References(50 Total References)


The F-35 will soon be equipped with artificial intelligence to control drone wingmen - Business Insider

feedproxy.google.com [cached]

Citing ongoing progress with computer algorithms and some degree of AI (artificial intelligence) already engineered into the F-35, Air Force Chief Scientist Gregory Zacharias said that technology was progressing quickly at the Air Force Research Lab - to the point where much higher degrees of autonomy and manned-unmanned teaming is expected to emerge in the near future.
"This involves an attempt to have another platform fly alongside a human, perhaps serving as a weapons truck carrying a bunch of missiles," Zacharias said in an interview with Scout Warrior. An F-35 computer system, Autonomic Logistics Information System, involves early applications of artificial intelligence wherein computers make assessments, go through checklists, organize information and make some decisions by themselves - without needing human intervention. "We are working on making platforms more autonomous with multi-int fusion systems and data from across different intel streams," Zacharias explained. However, despite the promise of advancing computer technology and increasingly levels of autonomy, Zacharias emphasized that dynamic human cognition is, in many respects, far more capable than computers. Computers can more quickly complete checklists and various procedures, whereas human perception abilities can more quickly process changing information in many respects. "A computer might have to go through a big long checklist, whereas a pilot might immediately know that the engines are out without going through a checklist. He is able to make a quicker decision about where to land," Zacharias said. The F-35s so-called "sensor fusion" uses computer algorithms to acquire, distill, organize and present otherwise disparate pieces of intelligence into a single picture for the pilot. The technology, Zacharias said, also exhibit some early implementations of artificial intelligence. "The more autonomy and intelligence you can put on these vehicles, the more useful they will become," Zacharias said. This development could greatly enhance mission scope, flexibility and effectiveness by enabling a fighter jet to conduct a mission with more weapons, sensors, targeting technology and cargo, Zacharias explained. The negative side is you have to watch out that you don't overload the pilot," Zacharias added. The resource allocation will be done by humans," Zacharias said. Another advantage of these technological advances is that one human may have an ability to control multiple drones and perform a command and control function - while drones execute various tasks such as sensor functions, targeting, weapons transport or electronic warfare activities. At the moment, multiple humans are often needed to control a single drone, and new algorithms increasing autonomy for drones could greatly change this ratio. Zacharias explained a potential future scenario wherein one human is able to control 10 - or even 100 - drones. At the same time, unanticipated movements, objects or combat circumstances can easily occur in the skies as well, Zacharias said. "We will get beyond simple guidance and control and will get into tactics and execution," Zacharias added. For example, with advances in computer technology, autonomy and artificial intelligence, drones will be able to stay above a certain area and identify particular identified relevant objects or targets at certain times, without needing a human operator, Zacharias added.


Intelsat General » Blog Entries

www.intelsatgeneral.com [cached]

When Greg L. Zacharias told a Congressional subcommittee in November that the Air Force sought “the right balance of human and machine teaming to meet future operational challenges,� he also was summarizing a large part of the body of his professional work.
Zacharias, named the Air Force Chief Scientist in June 2015, has been marrying [...] The post Zacharias Pays Back Air Force as Chief Scientist appeared first on Intelsat General. ]]> Greg L. Zacharias - image via af.mil Greg L. Zacharias - image via af.mil When Greg L. Zacharias told a Congressional subcommittee in November that the Air Force sought “the right balance of human and machine teaming to meet future operational challenges,� he also was summarizing a large part of the body of his professional work. Zacharias, named the Air Force Chief Scientist in June 2015, has been marrying humans to machines since his early days as an undergraduate at MIT. That certainly was true of his job with the space shuttle program as a young lieutenant, which inspired his masters’ thesis: “Digital Autopilot for the Space Shuttle Vehicle.� Much of his studies and writings about human behavior were to a large degree focused on trying to teach machines to act autonomously, without the need for constant human oversight. "(Becoming the service’s 35th chief scientist) was an offer I couldn't refuse and an opportunity to try and return something to the Air Force for all the opportunities it's given me since I was a second lieutenant assigned to Johnson Space Center back in the '70s," Zacharias said in a news release announcing the assignment. Much of that vision involves “development of sensors and data gathering technology for a system to better understand the operational environment and mission goals,� Zacharias told the House Armed Services Subcommittee on Emerging Threats and Capabilities on November 18. “Boiled down to its essentials, the Air Force’s autonomy science and technology vision is: intelligent machines seamlessly integrated with humans, maximizing mission performance in complex and contested environments.� As part of that vision, Zacharias told Defense News in a February interview that he was working on game-changing technologies that included remotely piloted aircraft (RPAs) and autonomy. The relationship between autonomy and RPAs is that between enabler and application, he added. “For instance,� he said, “now we manually look at full-motion video streams, looking for bad guys, and certainly that could be done with machine vision systems that are evolving. The idea is just having machines look at the big data problem.� The job of chief scientist is just the most recent link in a Zacharias-Air Force chain that stretches back to the job at Houston’s Johnson Space Center. He also served on the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board while president and senior principal scientist at Charles River Analytics Inc. in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Zacharias co-founded Charles River Analytics and for more than 30 years led much of its work in command and control software for the military. He was deeply involved in using autonomy with RPAs, work that had, at its core, Zacharias’ studies in behavioral science. Zacharias told the Congressional committee that two more volumes are coming, including Volume III, which “will address key infrastructure needs for autonomous system development, including cyber security/reliability, communications requirements and network vulnerability,� he said. It’s a volume that the commercial communications satellite industry eagerly awaits in continuing its role of supporting Air Force RPAs. His work with the Air Force includes pushing for faster development and acquisition of technology that will accomplish the service’s mission. Zacharias came to his current job from a small company that was used to “getting things done quickly and not having to deal with the bureaucracy,� he told Defense Systems.


www.intelsatgeneral.com

Greg L. Zacharias - image via af.mil
Greg L. Zacharias - image via af.mil When Greg L. Zacharias told a Congressional subcommittee in November that the Air Force sought "the right balance of human and machine teaming to meet future operational challenges," he also was summarizing a large part of the body of his professional work. Zacharias, named the Air Force Chief Scientist in June 2015, has been marrying humans to machines since his early days as an undergraduate at MIT. That certainly was true of his job with the space shuttle program as a young lieutenant, which inspired his masters' thesis: "Digital Autopilot for the Space Shuttle Vehicle. Much of his studies and writings about human behavior were to a large degree focused on trying to teach machines to act autonomously, without the need for constant human oversight. "(Becoming the service's 35th chief scientist) was an offer I couldn't refuse and an opportunity to try and return something to the Air Force for all the opportunities it's given me since I was a second lieutenant assigned to Johnson Space Center back in the '70s," Zacharias said in a news release announcing the assignment. Much of that vision involves "development of sensors and data gathering technology for a system to better understand the operational environment and mission goals," Zacharias told the House Armed Services Subcommittee on Emerging Threats and Capabilities on November 18. "Boiled down to its essentials, the Air Force's autonomy science and technology vision is: intelligent machines seamlessly integrated with humans, maximizing mission performance in complex and contested environments." As part of that vision, Zacharias told Defense News in a February interview that he was working on game-changing technologies that included remotely piloted aircraft (RPAs) and autonomy. The relationship between autonomy and RPAs is that between enabler and application, he added. "For instance," he said, "now we manually look at full-motion video streams, looking for bad guys, and certainly that could be done with machine vision systems that are evolving. The idea is just having machines look at the big data problem." The job of chief scientist is just the most recent link in a Zacharias-Air Force chain that stretches back to the job at Houston's Johnson Space Center. He also served on the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board while president and senior principal scientist at Charles River Analytics Inc. in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Zacharias co-founded Charles River Analytics and for more than 30 years led much of its work in command and control software for the military. He was deeply involved in using autonomy with RPAs, work that had, at its core, Zacharias' studies in behavioral science. Zacharias told the Congressional committee that two more volumes are coming, including Volume III, which "will address key infrastructure needs for autonomous system development, including cyber security/reliability, communications requirements and network vulnerability," he said. It's a volume that the commercial communications satellite industry eagerly awaits in continuing its role of supporting Air Force RPAs. His work with the Air Force includes pushing for faster development and acquisition of technology that will accomplish the service's mission. Zacharias came to his current job from a small company that was used to "getting things done quickly and not having to deal with the bureaucracy," he told Defense Systems.


Intelsat General | Satellite Communications, Payload Hosting, Cybersecurity, Transponder leases

www.intelsatgeneral.com [cached]

When Greg L. Zacharias told a Congressional subcommittee in November that the Air Force sought "the right balance of human and machine teaming to meet future operational challenges," he also was summarizing a large part of the body of his professional work.
Zacharias, named the Air Force Chief Scientist in June 2015, has been marrying [...]


www.hansmumm.com

Citing ongoing progress with artificial intelligence already engineered into the F-35, Air Force Chief Scientist Gregory Zacharias said that much higher degrees of autonomy and manned-unmanned teaming are expected to emerge in the near future from work at the Air Force Research Lab
"This involves an attempt to have another platform fly alongside a human, perhaps serving as a weapons truck carrying a bunch of missiles," Zacharias said in an interview with Defense Systems. An F-35 computer system, Autonomic Logistics Information System, uses early applications of artificial intelligence that help computers make assessments, go through checklists, organize information and make some decisions by themselves - without needing human intervention. "We are working on making platforms more autonomous with multi-infusion systems and data from across different intel streams," Zacharias explained. ALIS serves as the information infrastructure for the F-35, transmitting aircraft health and maintenance action information to the appropriate users on a globally-distributed network to technicians worldwide, said Lockheed Martin, the contractor that built the system. However, despite the promise of advancing computer technology and increasingly levels of autonomy, Zacharias emphasized that dynamic human cognition is, in many respects, far more capable than computers. Computers can more quickly complete checklists and various procedures, but human perception abilities can more quickly process changing information in many respects. "A computer might have to go through a big long checklist, whereas a pilot might immediately know that the engines are out without going through a checklist. He is able to make a quicker decision about where to land," Zacharias said. The F-35s so-called "sensor fusion" uses computer algorithms to acquire, distill, organize and present otherwise disparate pieces of intelligence into a single picture for the pilot. The technology, Zacharias said, also exhibits some early implementations of artificial intelligence. Systems such as a 360-degree sensor suite, called the Distributed Aperture System, is linked with targeting technologies, such as the aircraft's Electro-Optical Targeting System. At the moment, the flight path, sensor payload and weapons disposal of airborne drones such as Air Force Predators and Reapers are coordinated from ground control stations. In the future, drones will likely be operated from the cockpit of advanced fighter jets such as the Joint Strike Fighter or F-22, Zacharias predicted. Zacharias said F-35 pilots will be able to control a small group of drones flying nearby from the aircraft cockpit in the air, performing sensing, reconnaissance and targeting functions. "The more autonomy and intelligence you can put on these vehicles, the more useful they will become," he said. For example, with advances in computer technology, autonomy and artificial intelligence, drones will be able to stay above a certain area and identify particular identified relevant objects or targets at certain times, without needing a human operator, Zacharias added. This is particularly relevant because the large amount of ISR video demands organizing algorithms and technology to help process and sift through the vast volumes of gathered footage - in order to pinpoint and communicate what is tactically relevant. "With image processing and pattern recognition, you could just send a signal instead of using up all this bandwidth saying, "Hey, I just saw something 30-seconds ago you might want to look at the video feed I am sending right now,'" he explained. his development could greatly enhance mission scope, flexibility and effectiveness by enabling a fighter jet to conduct a mission with more weapons, sensors, targeting technology and cargo, Zacharias explained. At the same time, unanticipated movements, objects or combat circumstances can easily occur in the skies as well, Zacharias said.


Similar Profiles

city

Browse ZoomInfo's Business
Contact Directory by City

city

Browse ZoomInfo's
Business People Directory

city

Browse ZoomInfo's
Advanced Company Directory