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Graham Harrison

Professor

Sheffield University

HQ Phone:  +44 114 222 4330

Email: g***@***.uk

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Sheffield University

The Innovation Centre

Sheffield, South Yorkshire,S1 4DP

United Kingdom

Company Description

We pride ourselves on the quality and safety of each property. We provide modern amenities in each property. Comfort in your room is important, so each of our bedrooms has new modern furniture, including wardrobe, drawer cabinets, a computer desk and an office...more

Background Information

Employment History

Politics Teacher

The University of Sheffield


Coordinating Editor

Review of African Political Economy


Editor

New Political Economy


Web References(33 Total References)


YASN | Contacts

www.yasn.group.shef.ac.uk [cached]

Graham Harrison, The University of Sheffield
g.harrison@sheffield.ac.uk


Members of Staff - Staff - Politics - The University of Sheffield

www.sheffield.ac.uk [cached]

Professor Graham Harrison
g.harrison@sheffield.ac.uk 0114 222 1686


www.shef.ac.uk

Dr Graham Harrison


Panos London : Features & Opinions : Legacy of Make Poverty History was to 'Africanize' poverty

www.panos.org.uk [cached]

The report written by Graham Harrison at Sheffield University, argues that the 'Africanization' of the campaign diluted its overriding message of social justice.
The report's author, Dr Graham Harrison, a senior lecturer in the department of politics at the University of Sheffield, speaks to Panos London about his findings. Dr Graham Harrison: In the article I argue that to a great extent Make Poverty History's success - and limitations - derived from the increasing association of the coalition campaign with Africa, which I think occupies a specific place in the British popular imagination. Dr Graham Harrison: If I was pushed to give a stark answer to this question, it would be: 'Yes'! Dr Graham Harrison: MPH's messages had to adapt to circumstances, MPH itself was a very small organisation of very overworked individuals, the media, celebrities, and politicians generated their own narratives on Africa which in one way or another associated with MPH. Bear in mind also that MPH was a coalition of coalitions and that single messages could only be very simple and bland in order to encompass all. Strong messaging was extremely difficult, but strong branding provided MPH with a high public visibility. PL: Celebrities are often used to raise the profile of campaigns and MPH was no exception, what impact did they have on the MPH campaign? Also what do you think the role of celebrities should be on campaigns such as MPH? Dr Graham Harrison: MPH was quite wary of strong celebrity endorsement in the main. The white wristband adverts certainly provided exposure and reach for MPH, but I think celebrity endorsement should be minimised, if used at all. The concept of celebrity is antithetical to the more justice-based kinds of campaigns that many organisations consider to be their core politics. PL: As the G8 Muskoka summit took place last week, what recommendations do you have for campaigns like this in the future? Dr Graham Harrison: MPH was pretty unique - and I doubt anything similar will happen again soon, although campaign organisations routinely cooperate on things like trade justice or the arms trade. Author: Graham Harrison Email:G.Harrison@sheffield.ac.uk


Features & Opinions : Legacy of Make Poverty History was to 'Africanize' poverty

panos.org.uk [cached]

The report written by Graham Harrison at Sheffield University, argues that the 'Africanization' of the campaign diluted its overriding message of social justice.
The report's author, Dr Graham Harrison, a senior lecturer in the department of politics at the University of Sheffield, speaks to Panos London about his findings. Dr Graham Harrison: In the article I argue that to a great extent Make Poverty History's success - and limitations - derived from the increasing association of the coalition campaign with Africa, which I think occupies a specific place in the British popular imagination. Dr Graham Harrison: If I was pushed to give a stark answer to this question, it would be: 'Yes'! Dr Graham Harrison: MPH was successful in the way it brought a very widespread but fleeting awareness of African poverty. Dr Graham Harrison: MPH's messages had to adapt to circumstances, MPH itself was a very small organisation of very overworked individuals, the media, celebrities, and politicians generated their own narratives on Africa which in one way or another associated with MPH. Bear in mind also that MPH was a coalition of coalitions and that single messages could only be very simple and bland in order to encompass all. Strong messaging was extremely difficult, but strong branding provided MPH with a high public visibility. PL: Celebrities are often used to raise the profile of campaigns and MPH was no exception, what impact did they have on the MPH campaign? Also what do you think the role of celebrities should be on campaigns such as MPH? Dr Graham Harrison: MPH was quite wary of strong celebrity endorsement in the main. The white wristband adverts certainly provided exposure and reach for MPH, but I think celebrity endorsement should be minimised, if used at all. The concept of celebrity is antithetical to the more justice-based kinds of campaigns that many organisations consider to be their core politics. PL: As the G8 Muskoka summit took place last week, what recommendations do you have for campaigns like this in the future? Dr Graham Harrison: MPH was pretty unique - and I doubt anything similar will happen again soon, although campaign organisations routinely cooperate on things like trade justice or the arms trade. Author: Graham Harrison Email:G.Harrison@sheffield.ac.uk


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