Need more? Try out  Advanced Search (20+ criteria)»

logo

Last Update

This profile was last updated on 6/17/2017 and contains contributions from the  Zoominfo Community.

is this you? Claim your profile.

Wrong Goldie Byrd?

Goldie S. Byrd

Chair of the Department of Biology

North Carolina A&T State University

HQ Phone:  (336) 334-7500

Direct Phone: (336) ***-****direct phone

Email: g***@***.edu

GET ZOOMINFO GROW

+ Get 10 Free Contacts a Month

Please agree to the terms and conditions.

I agree to the  Terms of Service and  Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Grow at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

THANK YOU FOR DOWNLOADING!

computers
  • 1.Download
    ZoomInfo Grow
    v sign
  • 2.Run Installation
    Wizard
  • 3.Check your inbox to
    Sign in to ZoomInfo Grow

I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

North Carolina A&T State University

1601 E Market St

Greensboro, North Carolina,27411

United States

Company Description

North Carolina A&T State University is a land grant, public institution, with more than 7,600 students from across the United States and 43 different countries. It is the nation's No. 1 producer of minorities with degrees in science, mathematics, engineering a...more

Background Information

Employment History

Adjunct Assistant Professor

Duke University


Founding Director and Professor of Biology

COAACH Community


Chair of the Department of Biology

North Carolina A&T State University


Affiliations

North Carolina Central University

Faculty Member In the Biology Departments


Tennessee State University

Faculty Member In the Biology Departments


Center for Outreach

Founder


North Carolina Biotechnology Center

Board Member


NC Science & Technology

Board Member


The Byrds

Research Adjunct Faculty Member In the Department of Medicine


American Society of Human Genetics

Member


Education

Microbiology

Meharry Medical College


Bachelor of Science Degrees

Professional Biology and Biology Education

North Carolina A & T State University


Ph.D.

Microbial Genetics

Meharry Medical College


bachelor's degrees

professional biology and biology secondary education

A&T


Web References(90 Total References)


African-Americans & Alzheimer’s Disease - Meet Our Team

ncatad.com [cached]

Goldie Byrd, PhD
Goldie Byrd, PhD Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences Principal Investigator African American Alzheimer's Research Study North Carolina A&T State University Email: gsbyrd@ncat.edu Dr. Goldie Byrd received her Bachelor of Science Degrees in Professional Biology and Biology Education at North Carolina A & T State University. She received her Ph.D. in Microbial Genetics and completed her Post-Doctorial training at Meharry Medical College. In 2003, Dr. Byrd joined the faculty at North Carolina A


Board of Directors | North Carolina Biotech Center

www.ncbiotech.org [cached]

Goldie S. Byrd, Ph.D.
Dean for the College of Arts and Sciences NC A&T State University


Board of Directors - North Carolina Biotechnology Center

www.ncbiotech.org [cached]

Goldie S. Byrd, Ph.D
Professor and Chair, Biology NC A&T State University


Margaret Hodge » Latest News

margaret-hodge.co.uk [cached]

Lopez (University of Pittsburgh); Alison M. Goate (Washington University); Goldie S. Byrd (North Carolina A T University); and Jonathan L. Both of these guys are going to have a big role this season, but it anyone guess which week will belong to which player.


African Americans are more likely than whites to develop Alzheimer's. Why? COAACH

coaachhealth.org [cached]

One of the leading researchers trying to make sense of the disparity is Goldie Byrd.
Her work is multipronged: In addition to investigating a genetic component of Alzheimer's rates among African Americans, she has led the way in recruiting black participants for studies and trials. A biology professor at North Carolina A&T State University in Greensboro, she is the founder of the Center for Outreach in Alzheimer's, Aging and Community Health (COAACH), which is based at the university. COAACH opened in 2014, with the support of a $2 million grant from Merck pharmaceutical, and it has emerged as a kind of ground zero for innovative, cross-disciplinary and community-based responses to the disease. Byrd grew up in Magnolia, N.C., a small farming town where her family raised tobacco, corn and soybeans. Her path to this work began in 2002, when she was a visiting professor at Duke University Medical Center. Pericak-Vance told Byrd about the deficit. Researcher Goldie Byrd, biology professor at North Carolina A&T State University in Greensboro, is founder of the Center for Outreach in Alzheimer's, Aging and Community Health (COAACH), which is based at the university. (Jerry Wolford/For The Washington Post) For her part, Byrd, who sees inclusion as a fundamental part of her work, says she "knew immediately what the problem was": Efforts to enroll African Americans in Alzheimer's studies suffered from a lack of community engagement. After finishing her sabbatical at Duke, Byrd secured funding from NIH to prove that she could use a community investment methodology to get more black participation in Pericak-Vance's study. Yet nothing came easy. Byrd and her staff encountered obstacles that even she, as a black woman representing an HBCU (historically black colleges and universities), had to work to dismantle. "We knew we had to first build trust," she says, "and we needed people to tell us how to do that." Still, the main issue, Byrd says, was simply that many people had never been asked to take part in a study. "The more they learned about the research, the more they wanted to be part of it," she says. "When they were asked in surveys if they would participate in a trial or research, 80 percent of the time they said they would." She found that the Greensboro African American community was less concerned about the legacy of Tuskegee than the need for culturally sensitive outreach that would ensure participants were informed about how blood samples would be used. They also wanted a supportive relationship with the researchers so their questions could be addressed. To accommodate those without transportation, Byrd often had blood samples taken in homes. Over 18 months, 178 African Americans joined the study - more than tripling the number of black participants who had signed up in 10 years of open enrollment recruiting. Byrd and Pericak-Vance ultimately would recruit about 1,000 African Americans, whose blood samples became part of the Alzheimer's Disease Genetics Consortium, an NIA-funded project to identify genes associated with the onset of late-stage Alzheimer's disease. Because of Byrd and Pericak-Vance's efforts and the work of others who also brought African Americans into the study, the consortium was able to add the largest collection of African Americans with Alzheimer's to its research pool. Pericak-Vance calls Byrd a great collaborator. Yet in their early years of working together, Byrd declined an invitation to join Pericak-Vance at Miami. "It was so important," says Byrd, "to do this research at an HBCU, a school in the heart of a black community, among the people most affected by the disease and least studied, at a school where we were creating the next generation of African American medical researchers and scholars to fight it." Byrd's center, COAACH, is a leading innovator on this front. This, Byrd says, is what the future of Alzheimer's care must look like: all-inclusive, and supporting researchers and caregivers as much as those with the disease. "It was most important to me to leave something in the community," she says. Goldie Byrd: "As a people and as a community, we need to do more. "As a people and as a community, we need to do more," Byrd says.


Similar Profiles

city

Browse ZoomInfo's Business
Contact Directory by City

city

Browse ZoomInfo's
Business People Directory

city

Browse ZoomInfo's
Advanced Company Directory