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2014-07-24T00:00:00.000Z

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Central High School

Background Information

Employment History

Deceased
Central High School

President
Auburn Cord Duesenberg Club

Affiliations

Owner
AUBURN-CORD-DUESENBERG CO

Web References (26 Total References)


ACD Co. Story - AUBURN-CORD-DUESENBERG CO.

www.acdfactory.com [cached]

The ACD Co. would continue to operate in this manor until an Oklahoma industrial arts teacher and Cord restorer, by the name of Glenn Pray, offered to buy the ACD Co. With financial help from friend Wayne McKinley, Glenn would eventually strike a deal with Dallas Winslow.

...
According to Glenn Pray's estimate, he thinks that they transported 700,000 pounds of parts. Glenn Pray had actually purchased much more than just parts. He now controlled the trademark names, Auburn, Cord and Duesenberg.
Once the ACD Co. was moved to Oklahoma and set up, it began offering parts and restoration work again. It was not long after the move that Mr. Pray had thoughts of putting the 1936-1937 Cord back into production. He did just that... A newly engineered front wheel drive Modern Cord 8/10 was available from the ACD Co. in 1964. Gordon Buehrig, the cars original designer, worked with Glenn on the design of the new 8/10 Cord (8/10 meaning eight tenths the size of the original Cord).
...
Glenn built 138 Auburns in his factory and sold an estimated 90-100 Speedsters that were in various stages of completion. By the early to mid 1970's the 866 Speedsters were selling for $16,000-$18,000. In their final years of production, the cars were priced in the low $30,000 range
Not Speedsters, but equally beautiful cars are the Auburn 874 Phaetons that were also built by Glenn Prays' ACD Co. The car is a stretch dual cowl, dual windshield Auburn Speedster, less the boattail. The rear of the car was inspired by the 810/812 Cord. I met Glenn in 1978 at the ACD Club meet. He was delivering a then new, Maroon 874 Phaeton to it's new owner. The car was unbelievable, it drew a crowd all weekend. The concept and development of the 874 Auburn Phaeton is another very interesting story and is covered in both the Book and the DVD mentioned earlier. Glenn Pray ended Auburn production in 1981 due to health reasons. There were only 18 of these car fantastic cars produced. The 874 Phaeton's sold in the $45,000 to $60,000 range.
Glenn Pray still offers parts and restoration services from his Auburn-Cord-Duesenberg Co. I was last there in 2005 for Glenn's Annual Open house, usually held in May or June. All ACD cars are welcome, regardless of their original manufacturer. Glenn Pray is a great host.
...
There are always interesting restoration projects in Glenn's shop along with a lot of great stories.


Glenn's Story - AUBURN-CORD-DUESENBERG CO.

www.acdfactory.com [cached]

Glenn Pray

...
On March 24, 2011 the world of Auburn, Cord, and Duesenberg lost a colorful member and enthusiastic promoter in Glenn Pray.
Pray was a schoolteacher in OKlahoma when he acquired the Auburn Cord Deusenberg Company in 1960. This firm had been established in 1938 by Dallas Winslow, a Buick dealer from Flint, Michigan, who purchased the remaining assets of Auburn Automobile Company and continued to offer parts and service from the original administration building in Auburn. Pray moved the remaining parts stock to a former cannery--the infamous "Pickle Plant"--in Broken Arrow, Oklahoma, and went into business.
In the years to come, Pray acquired a reputation as one of the foremost dealers in Auburn and Cord parts, which he sold from the original parts bins in which they arrived in Broken Arrow. A visit to the "Pickle Plant" became a tradition for enthusiasts traveling west, who would spend time searching the bins for that elusive piece to complete their restoration. It is because of Glenn Pray that the original parts for our favorite cars were saved and became available to future generations, as they had been available in the 1940s and 1950s.
Pray's other major contribution to the ACD world was the introduction of a new Auburn and Cord in the 1960s. These were the original "replicars," although Pray himself disdained the term, preferring "second generation. Arguably Pray's "second generation" cars were the finest of their type, and while they were not a financially successful venture for him, they have built their own devoted following. Today, they are recognized alongside the originals of the Classic Era by the Auburn Cord Duesenberg Club, which refers to them, fittingly, as the Second Generation Cars.
Whether your favorite Auburn or Cord hails from the 1930s or the 1970s, Glenn Pray had what it took to keep it going.
...
In 1952 Glenn Pray started teaching high school auto mechanics at Central High School in Tulsa Oklahoma. He had fallen in love with the famous Gordan Buehrig designed 1936, 1937 Cord Phaeton as a young man and posted a photo of one on the school bulletin board. He asked the students to search the Tulsa area for a Cord for sale. The students located a 1937 Cord Super-charged Phaeton in need of much repair. With Glenn's skill at trading he was able to purchase his dream car. Over the next year or so Glenn Pray completed a restoration of what he considered the most beautiful car design of all times. Doing all the work himself Pray became an expert on the Cord automobiles. His Cord was driven as the family car and was shown at ACD car meets coast to coast. The Cord was never trailered, always driven. There is video of Glenn Pray driving it in the first ever Parade of Classics in 1956 in Auburn Indiana with is wife Nita who was pregnant with their 3rd child. Considered a family treasure the Cord would never be sold, however Glenn jumped on an opportunity to purchase the Auburn Cord Duesenberg Co. located in Auburn Indiana and was forced to sell his beloved Cord to help raise the money to purchase a defunct Automobile factory. So in 1961 Glenn found a new home for his Cord with James C. Leake----------------------
...
In the 1970s and again in the 1980s Glenn was in a position to try and find his Cord with the hope of buying it back. Looking through The ACD Club roster and seeking the help of Cord historians the Cord could not be located. It was not registered nor had it been seen at any car shows. The Cord experts presumed it had surely left the country. Glenn Pray went on to automotive fame and produced over 350 second Generation Glenn Pray Auburns, Cords and one Duesenberg. In the book "The Man Who Bought Legends to Life" The story is told of Glenn Pray's famous "Lost Cord" and shows a photo of Glenn as a young man receiving his first trophy for his fantastic Cord Phaeton. Glenn never did find or see his Cord again. Glenn Pray passed away in 2011 leaving behind a lifetime of accomplishments in the Auburn Cord Duesenberg world.
Fast forward to 2014. Doug Pray takes over the Famous Auburn Cord Duesenberg Co with the help of Glenn Pray's long time friend and general manager Felix DeGuyter, they sought to keep Glenn Prays legacy alive.
...
Glenn had replaced it with a NOS plate during restoration and never put the numbers on the new plate. He also learned that his dad had replaced the worn out engine with a rebuilt engine. Engine numbers meant nothing in the 50's and 60's, but he did keep a record of the number of the replacement engine he put in his Cord. The same number that was on the engine of the Cord located in a barn north of Detroit. The "lost Cord" had been found! With more searching Doug located the original matching numbers engine block stored safely away in Glenn Pray's old factory building since 1960.
...
The barn took its toll on the famous Cord but it was complete down to its cigarette lighter with the same tires Glenn put on it in the 1950's.
...
GLENN PRAY: The Untold Stories In this amusing book, Glenn Pray tells the story of himself and his rise to fame. Claiming he "started out with nothing and has most of it left", he borrowed a twenty-dollar bill, and bought the Auburn-Cord-Duesenberg Company. Within months, his name was splashed across every major newspaper from coast to coast and around the world as he began manufacturing his "second generation" Cord and Auburn automobiles.
19.95
Glenn Pray: The Man Who Brought Legends to Life Glenn Pray The Man Who Brought Legends to Life by Josh B. Malks Second Edition, 2007, Josh B.Malks Glenn Pray's name is a by-word in the collector car hobby. He is probably best known to the casual collector for his re-creations of the classic 1936-37 Cord and the 1935-36 Auburn Speedster, but these are only part of the automotive adventures of this remarkable man. ...(this book) provides an opportunity for the fancier of Pray's creations to more fully understand how they came to be, and to marvel at one man's ability to make his dreams come true. Color photo endpages, and beautiful black & white and color photos throughout. Black pebbled leatherette binding with gold signature imprint of Pray on cover. This is a gorgeous book!
45.00
Glenn Pray: The Man Who Brought Legends to Life (Paper Back) A well-written biography of a man who was obsessed, determined, gutsy, creative and sometimes desperate, but who never let the words 'no', 'can't' or impossible' interfere with his quest. very interesting reading.


AUBURN-CORD-DUESENBERG CO. - Auburn Cord Duesenberg

www.acdfactory.com [cached]

In 1952 Glenn Pray started teaching high school auto mechanics at Central High School in Tulsa Oklahoma. He had fallen in love with the famous Gordan Buehrig designed 1936, 1937 Cord Phaeton as a young man and posted a photo of one on the school bulletin board. He asked the students to search the Tulsa area for a Cord for sale. The students located a 1937 Cord Super-charged Phaeton in need of much repair. With Glenn's skill at trading he was able to purchase his dream car. Over the next year or so Glenn Pray completed a restoration of what he considered the most beautiful car design of all times. Doing all the work himself Pray became an expert on the Cord automobiles. His Cord was driven as the family car and was shown at ACD car meets coast to coast. The Cord was never trailered, always driven. There is video of Glenn Pray driving it in the first ever Parade of Classics in 1956 in Auburn Indiana with is wife Nita who was pregnant with their 3rd child. Considered a family treasure the Cord would never be sold, however Glenn jumped on an opportunity to purchase the Auburn Cord Duesenberg Co. located in Auburn Indiana and was forced to sell his beloved Cord to help raise the money to purchase a defunct Automobile factory. So in 1961 Glenn found a new home for his Cord with James C. Leake----------------------

...
In the 1970s and again in the 1980s Glenn was in a position to try and find his Cord with the hope of buying it back. Looking through The ACD Club roster and seeking the help of Cord historians the Cord could not be located. It was not registered nor had it been seen at any car shows. The Cord experts presumed it had surely left the country. Glenn Pray went on to automotive fame and produced over 350 second Generation Glenn Pray Auburns, Cords and one Duesenberg. In the book "The Man Who Bought Legends to Life" The story is told of Glenn Pray's famous "Lost Cord" and shows a photo of Glenn as a young man receiving his first trophy for his fantastic Cord Phaeton. Glenn never did find or see his Cord again. Glenn Pray passed away in 2011 leaving behind a lifetime of accomplishments in the Auburn Cord Duesenberg world.
Fast forward to 2014. Doug Pray takes over the Famous Auburn Cord Duesenberg Co with the help of Glenn Pray's long time friend and general manager Felix DeGuyter, they sought to keep Glenn Prays legacy alive.
...
Glenn had replaced it with a NOS plate during restoration and never put the numbers on the new plate. He also learned that his dad had replaced the worn out engine with a rebuilt engine. Engine numbers meant nothing in the 50's and 60's, but he did keep a record of the number of the replacement engine he put in his Cord. The same number that was on the engine of the Cord located in a barn north of Detroit. The "lost Cord" had been found! With more searching Doug located the original matching numbers engine block stored safely away in Glenn Pray's old factory building since 1960.
...
The barn took its toll on the famous Cord but it was complete down to its cigarette lighter with the same tires Glenn put on it in the 1950's.
...
It is our desire to carry on the tradition of some of the most beautiful and best engineered vehicles ever produced, and continue the legacy of Glenn Pray as one of the great visionaries and pioneers in the automobile industry. We have been selling parts and building cars since Glenn Pray Purchased the ACD Co. from Dallas Winslow in 1960.
...
This time we are not trying to develop any newly engineered vehicles or even ramp up restoration of the originals at our plant, instead we are seeking to carry on the story by supplying hard to find parts to the many owners and restorers who have been coming to Glenn since the 1960s. Through encouraging the restoration and preservation of some of the finest automobiles ever made and through supplying parts, information, and documentation we hope to preserve not only the vehicles themselves, but the memories lived out in and around them.
So, it is our hope that you will find what you are looking for on this site. If not, pick up the phone and give us a call. Glenn's son Doug is now sitting behind his fathers desk answering the same rotary phone Glenn used for the last 50 years.
...
Glenn Pray: The Man Who Brought Legends to Life (Paper Back)
...
GLENN PRAY: The Untold Stories


In 1952 Glenn Pray started ...

www.acdfactory.com [cached]

In 1952 Glenn Pray started teaching high school auto mechanics at Central High School in Tulsa Oklahoma. He had fallen in love with the famous Gordan Buehrig designed 1936, 1937 Cord Phaeton as a young man and posted a photo of one on the school bulletin board. He asked the students to search the Tulsa area for a Cord for sale. The students located a 1937 Cord Super-charged Phaeton in need of much repair. With Glenn's skill at trading he was able to purchase his dream car. Over the next year or so Glenn Pray completed a restoration of what he considered the most beautiful car design of all times. Doing all the work himself Pray became an expert on the Cord automobiles. His Cord was driven as the family car and was shown at ACD car meets coast to coast. The Cord was never trailered, always driven. There is video of Glenn Pray driving it in the first ever Parade of Classics in 1956 in Auburn Indiana with is wife Nita who was pregnant with their 3rd child. Considered a family treasure the Cord would never be sold, however Glenn jumped on an opportunity to purchase the Auburn Cord Duesenberg Co. located in Auburn Indiana and was forced to sell his beloved Cord to help raise the money to purchase a defunct Automobile factory. So in 1961 Glenn found a new home for his Cord with James C. Leake----------------------

...
In the 1970s and again in the 1980s Glenn was in a position to try and find his Cord with the hope of buying it back. Looking through The ACD Club roster and seeking the help of Cord historians the Cord could not be located. It was not registered nor had it been seen at any car shows. The Cord experts presumed it had surely left the country. Glenn Pray went on to automotive fame and produced over 350 second Generation Glenn Pray Auburns, Cords and one Duesenberg. In the book "The Man Who Bought Legends to Life" The story is told of Glenn Pray's famous "Lost Cord" and shows a photo of Glenn as a young man receiving his first trophy for his fantastic Cord Phaeton. Glenn never did find or see his Cord again. Glenn Pray passed away in 2011 leaving behind a lifetime of accomplishments in the Auburn Cord Duesenberg world.
Fast forward to 2014. Doug Pray takes over the Famous Auburn Cord Duesenberg Co with the help of Glenn Pray's long time friend and general manager Felix DeGuyter, they sought to keep Glenn Prays legacy alive.
...
Glenn had replaced it with a NOS plate during restoration and never put the numbers on the new plate. He also learned that his dad had replaced the worn out engine with a rebuilt engine. Engine numbers meant nothing in the 50's and 60's, but he did keep a record of the number of the replacement engine he put in his Cord. The same number that was on the engine of the Cord located in a barn north of Detroit. The "lost Cord" had been found! With more searching Doug located the original matching numbers engine block stored safely away in Glenn Pray's old factory building since 1960.
...
The barn took its toll on the famous Cord but it was complete down to its cigarette lighter with the same tires Glenn put on it in the 1950's.
...
It is our desire to carry on the tradition of some of the most beautiful and best engineered vehicles ever produced, and continue the legacy of Glenn Pray as one of the great visionaries and pioneers in the automobile industry. We have been selling parts and building cars since Glenn Pray Purchased the ACD Co. from Dallas Winslow in 1960.
...
This time we are not trying to develop any newly engineered vehicles or even ramp up restoration of the originals at our plant, instead we are seeking to carry on the story by supplying hard to find parts to the many owners and restorers who have been coming to Glenn since the 1960s. Through encouraging the restoration and preservation of some of the finest automobiles ever made and through supplying parts, information, and documentation we hope to preserve not only the vehicles themselves, but the memories lived out in and around them.
So, it is our hope that you will find what you are looking for on this site. If not, pick up the phone and give us a call. Glenn's son Doug is now sitting behind his fathers desk answering the same rotary phone Glenn used for the last 50 years.
...
Glenn Pray: The Man Who Brought Legends to Life (Paper Back)
...
GLENN PRAY: The Untold Stories


The Glenn Pray Cord Group Documentary Web Site

www.glenn-pray-cord-group.com [cached]

The documentary chronicles the story of Glenn Pray, president and owner of Auburn-Cord-Duesenberg Company. In 1960 he dared to do what others, including Preston Tucker, had attempted -- to build and sell a new type of automobile. Not only did he do it once; he did it again and again. First he introduced a modern version of the Cord automobile; then he introduced a modern version of the Auburn Speedster.

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