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2016-07-12T00:00:00.000Z

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Wrong Gillian Reynolds?

Dr. Gillian Reynolds

Radio Critic

london telegraph

london telegraph

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Background Information

Affiliations

Trustee
National Museums Liverpool

Honorary Fellow
Oxford college

Council Member
The Society of Authors

Fellow
Royal Television Society

Honorary Fellow
St Anne's College

Visiting Fellow
Bournemouth University

Education



St Anne's College

Web References (199 Total References)


Hot Pod – News about Podcasts and On-Demand Audio

www.hotpodnews.com [cached]

"I think the corporate heart of the BBC currently undervalues radio and may well be about to undermine it," wrote Gillian Reynolds, the radio critic at The Telegraph, in a column published two weeks ago. (Radio critic! I want that job!)

Reynolds noted that "a 20 percent portion of [the BBC's licence fee] is spent on radio but accounts for 40 per cent of total BBC consumption," and that the BBC's radio properties - along with its digital audio relatives - provides its public with an unmatched programming value. She is concerned, then, with the institution's recent move to merge its radio commissioning division with its television unit. "There really is nothing like BBC radio anywhere else in the world. Dilute it and it will vanish," she argued.


Hot Pod – News about Podcasts and On-Demand Audio

www.hotpodnews.com [cached]

"I think the corporate heart of the BBC currently undervalues radio and may well be about to undermine it," wrote Gillian Reynolds, the radio critic at The Telegraph, in a column published two weeks ago. (Radio critic! I want that job!)

Reynolds noted that "a 20 percent portion of [the BBC's licence fee] is spent on radio but accounts for 40 per cent of total BBC consumption," and that the BBC's radio properties - along with its digital audio relatives - provides its public with an unmatched programming value. She is concerned, then, with the institution's recent move to merge its radio commissioning division with its television unit. "There really is nothing like BBC radio anywhere else in the world. Dilute it and it will vanish," she argued.


An independent committee, appointed by ...

www.reputationcommunications.com [cached]

An independent committee, appointed by the RadioCentre board, will select the final 40, chaired by industry veteran Paul Brown, alongside The Daily Telegraph's Gillian Reynolds, author and broadcaster John Myers and Ralph Bernard, former Chief Executive of GCap Radio.


A saner observation comes from the ...

www.orwellsociety.com [cached]

A saner observation comes from the Telegraph's Gillian Reynolds, who pooh-poohed the idea of a statue, and demanded instead that the BBC offer the world a better memorial to the material he produced, or helped produce, during his stint there, and also to his wider body of work: "I suggest, instead of putting up some dumb hunk of stone, celebrate his work," she writes. "Search the BBC archive for any programmes on which he worked (likely to be very few) and all the programmes made from his work (there are definitely many) and make them freely available, worldwide, in perpetuity, on the BBC website. Don't tell me that would cost more than a statue. It would be money better spent."

It may seem late in the day, but now that the dust has settled, and recognising that this discussion isn't nearly so urgent or fraught as it has been painted, what do Orwell Society members, and visitors to the site, think? My own view is that the BBC could make amends for this perceived snub to one of its finest former employees by offering its services to mount a public poll about the siting of the statue - which we must assume, whatever Gillian Reynolds wishes, will come into being, and still needs a worthy resting-place.


A saner observation comes from the ...

www.orwellsociety.com [cached]

A saner observation comes from the Telegraph's Gillian Reynolds, who pooh-poohed the idea of a statue, and demanded instead that the BBC offer the world a better memorial to the material he produced, or helped produce, during his stint there, and also to his wider body of work: "I suggest, instead of putting up some dumb hunk of stone, celebrate his work," she writes. "Search the BBC archive for any programmes on which he worked (likely to be very few) and all the programmes made from his work (there are definitely many) and make them freely available, worldwide, in perpetuity, on the BBC website. Don't tell me that would cost more than a statue. It would be money better spent."

It may seem late in the day, but now that the dust has settled, and recognising that this discussion isn't nearly so urgent or fraught as it has been painted, what do Orwell Society members, and visitors to the site, think? My own view is that the BBC could make amends for this perceived snub to one of its finest former employees by offering its services to mount a public poll about the siting of the statue - which we must assume, whatever Gillian Reynolds wishes, will come into being, and still needs a worthy resting-place.

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