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Wrong Gillian Einstein?

Gillian Einstein

Associate Professor

Dalla Lana School of Public Health

Direct Phone: (416) ***-****direct phone

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Dalla Lana School of Public Health

Fitzgerald Building 147, 150 College Street

Toronto, Ontario,M5S 3E2

Canada

Company Description

The Institute aims to promote the health of Indigenous peoples - one of the biggest inequity issues facing Canadians - in Canada and globally using multidisciplinary, population and community-based participatory research approaches. Established in 2014 with a ... more

Find other employees at this company (122)

Background Information

Employment History

Associate Professor of Psychology and Public Health

University of Toronto


Affiliations

Canadian Institutes of Health Research

Advisory Board Member


Institute of Gender and Health

Advisory Board Member


Organization for the Study of Sex Differences

Founding Member


Institute for Life Course and Aging

Member


World Health Organization

Advisor


Bonham Centre for Sexual Diversity Studies at the University of Toronto

Member


University College

Senior Fellow


School of Graduate Studies

Full Member


Institute for Human Development

Member


Gruter Institute

Board Member


Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre

Member of the Scientific Staff of Obstetrics and Gynecology


WHO

Special Advisor On FGM


Education

A.B.

Harvard


Ph.D.

University of Pennsylvania


Web References(144 Total References)


IGH Institute Advisory Board Members – Biographies - CIHR

www.irsc-cihr.gc.ca [cached]

Gillian Einstein, PhD (Chair)
Associate Professor of Psychology and Public Health University of Toronto Gillian Einstein is a neuroscientist who has published in vision, Alzheimer's and aging research, sex differences, and women's health. She has edited and annotated a book of classic papers in Hormones and Behavior called, Sex and the Brain (MIT Press, 2007). She is an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology and The Dalla Lana School of Public Health at the University of Toronto, Senior Scientist at Women's College Research Institute, Member of the Scientific Staff of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Senior Fellow of University College, and a member of both the Institute for Life Course and Aging, and the Bonham Centre for Sexual Diversity Studies at the University of Toronto. She is also founder and Director of the Collaborative Graduate Program in Women's Health at the University of Toronto, founding member of the Organization for the Study of Sex Differences, and a temporary advisor to WHO on the psychological effects of female genital cutting/mutilation. She served on the faculty of the Department of Neurobiology, Duke University where she founded and directed the first year program, Exploring the Mind and was the recipient of the Alumni Undergraduate Teaching Award. She has also been a Scientific Review Officer at the National Institutes of Health (US), and the Associate Director of the Centre for Research in Women's Health at the University of Toronto. She has been a mentor in the Institute of Gender and Health's Summer Institute (2009, 2010) and In the spring term of 2010 she was a visiting professor with the Committee for Degrees in Women, Gender and Sexuality at Harvard University. Dr. Einstein's interests are in memory, sex/gender representations in the nervous system, mixed methods, and the bridge between our scientific understanding of the nervous system and larger concerns having to do with self, identity, feminism, and the nature of science. Her research program focuses on three major areas: 1) the neurobiological effects of such cultural practices as female genital cutting and 2) the effects of the ovulatory cycle on mood and memory; and 3) the representation of the female body in the brain.


Women's Health

www.hpme.utoronto.ca [cached]

Gillian Einstein, Director
tel: (416) 978-0896


Dalla Lana School of Public Health - University of Toronto Home

www.phs.utoronto.ca [cached]

Gillian Einstein, PhD


U of T researcher looks into why dementia and depression hit women hardest

www.utoronto.ca [cached]

Gillian Einstein
Gillian Einstein's work is breaking new ground in how researchers think about biological and social factors and the ways they relate to health (photo courtesy of Gillian Einstein) Gillian Einstein is the holder of the inaugural Wilfred and Joyce Posluns chair in women's brain health and aging Why is the incidence of depression, stroke, dementia and Alzheimer's significantly higher in women than men? Women's health - and women's brain health, in particular - is something "distinct in itself", says University of Toronto researcher Gillian Einstein, the holder of the inaugural Wilfred and Joyce Posluns chair in women's brain health and aging. Yet the majority of research into women's health has so far focused mainly on reproductive health, rather than on other systems like the nervous, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular and immune systems and the ways in which they're influenced by hormones like estrogen. Einstein is an associate professor of psychology in the Faculty of Arts & Science and the Dalla Lana School of Public Health. With the support of the Posluns chair - $1 million over five years - Einstein is keen to look into a number of key mysteries surrounding women's brain health. "Women are subjected to different life conditions than men," she says. "A big mystery is why more women have Alzheimer's disease than men." Einstein says with women living longer that could explain the discrepancy. But it could also be that women are subjected to "different life conditions than men." There have not been many studies trying to understand if gendered life experiences - like having one's ovaries removed - might affect the prevalence of Alzheimer's disease, she says. Reports indicate that those who have their ovaries removed have a higher incidence of dementia. "One of the things that the Posluns Chair will allow us to do," says Einstein, "is to study the trajectory of brain changes from having one's ovaries removed to, say, 13 years later. When do the brain changes start? Are they getting worse over time? Which brain regions are most affected?" The significance of the Posluns chair being awarded to a researcher from U of T is not lost on Einstein. She points to the calibre of research and the culture of teamwork here. "My research program wouldn't be possible without the kind of collaboration of excellent scientists that exists here. There isn't any project in my lab that doesn't have at least three or four people who are collaborating on it." In addition to pursuing her own research, Einstein is passionate about encouraging students who are interested in studying sex, gender and brain health. "One of the goals of the chair is to provide graduate students in psychology and neuroscience who are studying the brain and cognition extra financial support if they're interested in adding sex differences to their studies or adding females or women to their research," says Einstein. Having more researchers thinking about sex differences and gender and how to incorporate these considerations into their studies would enhance the rigour and relevance of brain and cognition research. "There are a lot of expectations about the way that women are supposed to be, and sometimes we only research those things," says Einstein. "We have actually gendered those hormones as 'male' or 'female' and then we study them in the sex we think they belong in," explains Einstein.


Gexcel | Previous events

gexcel.org [cached]

Prof. Gillian Einstein, Univ of Toronto, Canada, and Linköping University


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