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2016-10-30T00:00:00.000Z

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Wrong Gillian Einstein?

Dr. Gillian Einstein PhD

Director of Collaborative Graduate Program In Women's Health

U of T

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U of T

Background Information

Employment History

Director

University of Toronto

Associate Professor

Dalla Lana School of Public Health

Affiliations

Chair of the Gender and Health Advisory Board
Canadian Institutes of Health Research

Advisory Board Member
Institute of Gender and Health

Founding Member
Organization for the Study of Sex Differences

Member
Bonham Centre for Sexual Diversity Studies at the University of Toronto

Senior Fellow
University College

Member
Institute for Life Course and Aging

Advisor
World Health Organization

Full Member
School of Graduate Studies

Member
Institute for Human Development

Board Member
Gruter Institute

Member of the Scientific Staff of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre

Special Advisor On FGM
WHO

Education

A.B.

Harvard

Ph.D.

University of Pennsylvania

Web References (197 Total References)


News

home.psych.utoronto.ca [cached]

Psychology faculty member Gillian Einstein has received funding from the Canadian Breast Canada Foundation (CBCF) to study what happens to women's cognition, including memory and attention, after their ovaries are removed. Women who carry the BRCA1 or 2 mutations, which increase the risk of cancer, are often counselled to have their ovaries removed as a preventative measre. Dr. Einstein believes that they need. and have the right, to know how this will affect them in order to make a properly informed decision. Her study will fill the need for more research on the effect of ovarian removal on cognition.

...
Psychology's Gillian Einstein, Director of U of T's Collaborative Graduate Program in Women's Health, was interviewed on CBC's Metro Morning about the Women's Brain Health Intiative with the Initiative's founder, Lynn Posluns.
...
These include research by graduate student Renée Biss on the benefits of 'early to bed, early to rise' , Dr. Gillian Einstein's co-written paper on the relationship, or lack thereof, between PMS and mood, and UTM Professor Emily Impett's collaborative study on Facebook images and what they say about relationships.


Dalla Lana School of Public Health

www.dlsph.utoronto.ca [cached]

DLSPH & U of T's researcher and neuroscientist Gillian Einstein in the news


DLSPH & U of T's researcher ...

www.dlsph.utoronto.ca [cached]

DLSPH & U of T's researcher and neuroscientist Gillian Einstein in the news


"There is so much cultural baggage ...

medicine.utoronto.ca [cached]

"There is so much cultural baggage around women's menstrual cycles, and entire industries built around the idea that women are moody, irrational - even unstable - in the phase leading up to menstruation," says Dr. Gillian Einstein, director of U of T's collaborative program in Women's Health and one of several U of T experts who reviewed the literature. "Our review - which shows no clear evidence that PMS exists - will be surprising to many people, including health professionals." Of the 41 papers the panel examined, only six (or 13.5 per cent) showed any association between negative moods and the pre-menstrual phase, says Einstein, an associate professor in the Department of Psychology and the Dalla Lana School of Public Health. Further, the team found that some of those studies may even have been biased because study participants were not "blinded" to the purpose of the study. "Before women even get their first period, they have heard about PMS. The notion is so ingrained in our culture that some of these studies are actually biased because women know the study is about PMS," says Einstein, also a senior scientist with Women's College Hospital and a scientific associate with Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre. The review did not address the existence of premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD), a clinical mood disorder linked with the menstrual cycle that is characterized by severe physical and behavioural symptoms in the latter half of the menstrual cycle. It also did not discount the existence of physical symptoms such as bloating and cramping related to the pre-menstrual phase. Einstein says the research demonstrates the need to examine other factors which play a role in impacting women's moods so that the real challenges can be treated. "There are so many things going on in women's lives that can have a distinct impact on their moods - stress, lack of social support, economic hardship, physical ailments," she says.


"There is so much cultural baggage ...

medicine.utoronto.ca [cached]

"There is so much cultural baggage around women's menstrual cycles, and entire industries built around the idea that women are moody, irrational - even unstable - in the phase leading up to menstruation," says Dr. Gillian Einstein, director of U of T's collaborative program in Women's Health and one of several U of T experts who reviewed the literature. "Our review - which shows no clear evidence that PMS exists - will be surprising to many people, including health professionals." Of the 41 papers the panel examined, only six (or 13.5 per cent) showed any association between negative moods and the pre-menstrual phase, says Einstein, an associate professor in the Department of Psychology and the Dalla Lana School of Public Health. Further, the team found that some of those studies may even have been biased because study participants were not "blinded" to the purpose of the study. "Before women even get their first period, they have heard about PMS. The notion is so ingrained in our culture that some of these studies are actually biased because women know the study is about PMS," says Einstein, also a senior scientist with Women's College Hospital and a scientific associate with Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre. The review did not address the existence of premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD), a clinical mood disorder linked with the menstrual cycle that is characterized by severe physical and behavioural symptoms in the latter half of the menstrual cycle. It also did not discount the existence of physical symptoms such as bloating and cramping related to the pre-menstrual phase. Einstein says the research demonstrates the need to examine other factors which play a role in impacting women's moods so that the real challenges can be treated. "There are so many things going on in women's lives that can have a distinct impact on their moods - stress, lack of social support, economic hardship, physical ailments," she says.

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