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Wrong Gianluca Farusi?

Gianluca Farusi

Chemistry Teacher

Galileo Galilei

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Background Information

Employment History

Member, Faculty of Medicinal Chemistry

University of Pisa


Web References(14 Total References)


Living light: the chemistry of bioluminescence | www.scienceinschool.org

www.scienceinschool.org [cached]

Gianluca Farusi, Susan Watt
Other activities in the project include synthesising indigo (Farusi, 2012), recreating ancient perfumes (Farusi, 2011), preparing glass tesserae with boric acid and preparing iron-gall ink (Farusi, 2007). The whole project was presented at the international Science on Stage festivalw3 in Copenhagen, Denmark, in 2011. Gianluca Farusi teaches chemistry at the technical school (Istituto Tecnico Industriale) Galileo Galilei in Avenza-Carrara, Italy. Since 2004, he has also lectured in stoichiometry at the University of Pisa, Italy, for the degree programme in medicinal chemistry and technology. In addition, he is the regional tutor for the Italian ministerial project 'Insegnare Scienze Sperimentali' ('teaching experimental sciences') and the regional REACH (registration, evaluation, authorisation and restriction of chemicals) tutor for secondary schools. Gianluca has been teaching for 20 years and nothing gratifies him more than the delight on his students' faces when they grasp a difficult chemical concept.


Looking for antioxidant food | www.scienceinschool.org

www.scienceinschool.org [cached]

Gianluca Farusi
We've all heard that an antioxidant-rich diet is healthy. Together with his students, Gianluca Farusi compared the antioxidant levels in a range of foods and drinks. Images courtesy of Gianluca Farusi The author, Gianluca Farusi Image courtesy of Gianluca Farusi See also Gianluca Farusi's previous articles in Science in School: Farusi G (2006) Teaching science and humanities: an interdisciplinary approach. Science in School1: 30-33. Farusi G (2007) Monastic ink: linking chemistry and history.Science in School6: 36-40. Author Gianluca Farusi teaches chemistry at the technical school (Istituto Tecnico Industriale) Galileo Galilei in Avenza-Carrara, Italy, and stoichiometry at the University of Pisa, Italy. He has been teaching for 12 years and nothing gratifies him more than the delight on his students' faces when they grasp a difficult chemical concept. This activity, which was carried out with his school students, won Gianluca an EIROforum Science Teaching Award: the ILL Prize (Science on Stage 2, 2007). He has also been awarded the ESRF Prize (Science on Stage 1, 2005) and the Italian Chemical Society's Illuminati Prize for Chemistry Didactics (2006).


Indigo: recreating Pharaoh's dye | www.scienceinschool.org

www.scienceinschool.org [cached]

Gianluca Farusi
What links your jeans, sea snails, woad plants and the Egyptian royal family? It's the dye, indigo. Images courtesy of Gianluca Farusi Image courtesy of Gianluca Farusi My students produced dyes from onion skins, from madder (Farusi, 2006), and from myrtle berries. Other activities in the project include recreating ancient perfumes (Farusi, 2011), preparing glass tesserae with boric acid, simulating the luminescence of the shellfish Pholas dactylus, and preparing iron-gall ink (Farusi, 2007). Gianluca Farusi teaches chemistry at the technical school (Istituto Tecnico Industriale) Galileo Galilei in Avenza-Carrara, Italy, and since 2004, he has lectured in stoichiometry at the University of Pisa, Italy, for the degree programme in medicinal chemistry and technology. He is also the regional tutor for the Italian ministerial project 'Insegnare Scienze Sperimentali' ('teaching experimental sciences'). For secondary schools, Gianluca is also the regional REACH (registration, evaluation, authorisation and restriction of chemicals) tutor. He has been teaching for 16 years and nothing gratifies him more than the delight on his students' faces when they grasp a difficult chemical concept. In this and several other Science in School articles, Gianluca Farusi successfully blends ancient history and chemistry in an unusual mixture - in this case, an innovative and simple practical activity to isolate the dye indigo from the leaves of the woad plant (Isatis tinctoria).


www.scienceinschool.org

Image courtesy of Gianluca Farusi
We've all heard that an antioxidant-rich diet is healthy. Together with his students, Gianluca Farusi compared the antioxidant levels in a range of foods and drinks. Images courtesy of Gianluca Farusi The author, Gianluca Farusi Image courtesy of Gianluca Farusi See also Gianluca Farusi's previous articles in Science in School: Gianluca Farusi teaches chemistry at the technical school (Istituto Tecnico Industriale) Galileo Galilei in Avenza-Carrara, Italy, and stoichiometry at the University of Pisa, Italy. He has been teaching for 12 years and nothing gratifies him more than the delight on his students' faces when they grasp a difficult chemical concept. This activity, which was carried out with his school students, won Gianluca an EIROforum Science Teaching Award: the ILL Prize (Science on Stage 2, 2007). He has also been awarded the ESRF Prize (Science on Stage 1, 2005) and the Italian Chemical Society's Illuminati Prize for Chemistry Didactics (2006).


Teaching science and humanities: an interdisciplinary approach | Science in School

www.scienceinschool.org [cached]

Author, Gianluca Farusi
There is an increasing demand for an interdisciplinary approach to teaching, but providing inspiring and achievable lessons is no easy task. Chemistry teacher Gianluca Farusi explains how he used two Italian Renaissance paintings to delve into the chemistry of pigment extraction and the physics of forensics. Gianluca Farusi teaches chemistry at the technical school (istituto tecnico industriale) Galileo Galilei in Carrara, Italy.


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