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Wrong A. Ghosh?

A. K. Ghosh

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Background Information

Employment History

Registrar

Bose Research Institute , Calcutta


Chairman At the Indian Palynological Congress

Chandigarh


Chairman

Indian Palynological Congress


Affiliations

American Association of Stratigraphic Palynologists Inc

Trustee


Web References(9 Total References)


AASP: Satish Srivastava

www.palynology.org [cached]

Meanwhile A. K. Ghosh joined ONGC as Palynologist-In-Charge.
I worked under the Palynologist-In-Charge, A. K. Ghosh, who had been registrar at the Bose Research Institute, Calcutta, and was about 53 years old. Although Ghosh had to rewrite his thesis, he never resubmitted it, but worked on the Vindhyans for most of his life. The fragmentary plant microfossils of the Vindhyans and the Salt Range could never be reconciled and Ghosh remained in direct controversy with Birbal Sahni. Upon hearing that I worked with Ghosh at ONGC, Potonié exclaimed "Oh! Cambrian Ghosh. Potonié was most courteous and his wife, clad in a white chiken-embroidered [of local fame] sari, greeted me graciously and treated me to candies. Soon I became in Ghosh's good books due to my zeal for publication. I assisted him in preparing his manuscripts and co-authored publications with him. Ghosh had a knack of indulging in controversial problems. I guess he wanted to produce results where others failed. The Krols, exposed as a belt of nappes from east to west in the Himalayas, had tantalized several paleontologists but produced frustratingly few results. In 1959, Ghosh, A. T. R. Raju (an ONGC field geologist-petrologist), and I collected Precambrian to Jurassic samples, including the Krols, from exposures along a mule-track between Dehradun and Mussoorie. This gave me my first taste of field geology. In 1962, Ghosh and I co-authored a paper on the palynology of Krols [Ghosh, A. K. and Srivastava, S. K. 1962. In 1962, A. K. Ghosh attended the First Palynological Conference in Tucson. He presented a paper on polycolpate pollen grains in the Tertiary of India [co-authors S. K. Srivastava and J. Sen, published 1963 (1964)] and proposed their affinity with Nothofagus. Our polycolpate paper was in press at the time so Ghosh added a postscript to the galley-proofs that the wide distribution of Nothofagus in Africa, India and Far East during Senonian and Paleocene indicated similar environmental conditions at those times in now widely-separated lands. Amiya Kumar Ghosh


AASP: Amiya Kumar Ghosh

www.palynology.org [cached]

Amiya Kumar Ghosh
AASP: Amiya Kumar Ghosh AASP - The Palynological Society AASP History > Amiya Kumar Ghosh Amiya Kumar Ghosh In the case of Prof. Ghosh his contact with palaeobotany started in 1941 with the investigation of fossil pollen obtained from the maceration of a Tertiary carbonaceous shale from Laitringew near Cherrapunji, then in Assam, but now in the State of Meghalaya. Thus began his evergrowing interest in the study of microfossils which was later to be known as "Palaeopalynology". With his educational background of both botany and ecology, he was ideally suited for this discipline. The study of Tertiary pollen from Assam was followed by an investigation of Late Tertiary diatomaceous earth from the Nicobar Islands. The short descriptions and the detailed drawings of the important diatom genera obtained from this earth illustrate the keenness of observation displayed by Prof. Ghosh. Ghosh and Sen's study furnished a proof of the usefulness of plant microfossils in the correlation of coal seams in those early days. About 52 spore types, 11 types of wood fragments, 31 cuticular types and 8 unknown plant fragments interesting both from correlative and palaeobotanical points of view were described and discussed. The evidence of microfloral assemblage was also regarded to indicate a warm, moist and uniform climate prevailing during the formation of these coal seams. As a sequel and elaboration of the above study Prof. Ghosh in 1953 pointed out a paper entitled "Recent advances on palaeobotany of coal and their application to the scientific and technological utilization of coal" that besides the application of microfossils in the correlation of coal seams, coal palaeobotany has other economic application like determining the nature of coal, determination of horizons and genetic age of the coal, exploration of a known seam is an unknown area across a fault and also amount of crushing necessary from different coal after extraction. Prof. Ghosh and his associates checked the results obtained by Prof. Sahni and his collaborators and found the occurrence of vascular elements even in the Cambrian rocks. But it inspired Prof. Ghosh to further investigate whether vascular plants existed in Cambrian times or not. To collect sufficient evidences, he and A. Bose, his main associate in this study, investigated Cambrian rocks of Punjab Salt Range and Kashmir, Pre-Cambrian rocks of Dharwar and Cuddapah, some Vindhyan rocks and a few Cambrian specimens from North America. From these rocks they obtained wood elements and monolete and trilete types of spores, leading to the conclusion of the fact that their findings were not in agreement with the view of the majority of investigators who did not consider vascular plants to have existed in Pre-Silurian times. Still they had the courage to stand by their own observations, which were also supported by the works of Naumova, Reissinger and Kopeliovitch in Europe and Jacob and his associates in India. In 1969 they again published a paper on the spores of vascular plants obtained from nine samples of Cambrain rocks of North America, further reiterating the existence of vascular plants in the Cambrian. Prof. Ghosh's investigations related with the occurrence of earliest vascular plant led him to have a more critical looks to at all the organic remains reported from Pre-Cambrian deposits. This formed the subject matter of the 43rd Acharya Jagadis Chandra Bose endowment lecture which he delivered in November 1973 under the title "Life in the Proterozoic". In 1956 Prof. Ghosh joined the Oil and Natural Gas Commission and established a palynological laboratory at Dehra Dun. For nearly the next decade his publications were mainly, though not exclusively, in the domain of palaeopalynology with a bearing on stratigraphy. Palynological examination of different samples of various horizons from eastern and south western India by Ghosh and his associates and ONGC revealed that round grains bearing 4 to 11 colpi, scabrate exine having reticulate ornamentation were restricted in Pre-Miocene horizons. Prof. Ghosh published two comprehensive papers on the role of palynology in oil exploration and one dealing with palynology in relation to stratigraphy in general. Two of his addresses were devoted to special areas of palynology. In the 8th Annual Lecture to the Palynological Society of India delivered in 1973, he dealt with the palynology of the Gondwanas. Later, in his address as a chairman at the first Indian Palynological Congress at Chandigarh (published in 1977) he spoke about the palynology of the Siwaliks. This is by no means is an exhaustive treatment of the entire palaeobotanical work of Prof. A. K. Ghosh but only a brief resume which I have presented on this auspicious occasion when he have all gathered here to honour a great teacher and a devoted scientist. Mr. A. K. Ghosh was registrar at the Bose Research Institute, Calcutta, before his appointment in the ONGC as Palynologist (Sr.) in 1956 and in-charge of the Palynology Laboratory. He was about 53 yrs age. He worked intensely on the palynology of the Vindhyan Series. The age of the Upper Vindhyans is controversial but generally believed as basal Cambrian. They are correlated with the Salt Range Cambrian strata of western Himalayas in Kashmir. Once Ghosh told me that his thesis on the plant remains in Vindhyans completed under the supervision of Professor S. P. Agharkar at Calcutta University was adversely criticized by Professor Birbal Sahni of Lucknow University, who had worked on the Salt Range and was an external examiner for his thesis. Ghosh never resubmitted thesis but worked on Vindhyans most of his life. The presence of fragmentary vascular plant microfossils of the Vindhyans and their correlation with Salt Range could never be reconciled. Thus, Ghosh came in direct controversy with Birbal Sahni whose viewpoints contradicted Ghosh's. Thus, Ghosh came in direct controversy with Birbal Sahni whose viewpoints contradicted Ghosh's. The controversy received global attention and Ghosh became known as "Cambrian Ghosh" worldwide. On his retirement from ONGC in 1962, Ghosh became an emeritus professor in the Botany Department of Calcutta University where he advised several palynology students, e.g., Manju Sharma, A. Nandi. Ghosh had a knack of indulging in controversial problems. He wanted to produce results where others failed. The Krols, exposed as a belt of nappes from east to west in the Himalayas, had tantalized several paleontologists but produced frustratingly few results. In 1959, Ghosh, A. T. R. Raju (an ONGC field geologist-petrologist), and I (Satish Srivastava) collected Precambrian to Jurassic samples, including the Krols, from exposures along a mule-track between Dehradun and Mussoorie. In 1962, Ghosh and I co-authored a paper on the palynology of Krols beds exposed on this tract. Amiya Kumar Ghosh


AASP Primary Records A K Ghosh

www.palynology.org [cached]

Amiya Kumar Ghosh
In the case of Prof. Ghosh his contact with palaeobotany started in 1941 with the investigation of fossil pollen obtained from the maceration of a Tertiary carbonaceous shale from Laitringew near Cherrapunji, then in Assam, but now in the State of Meghalaya. Thus began his evergrowing interest in the study of microfossils which was later to be known as "Palaeopalynology". With his educational background of both botany and ecology, he was ideally suited for this discipline. The study of Tertiary pollen from Assam was followed by an investigation of Late Tertiary diatomaceous earth from the Nicobar Islands. The short descriptions and the detailed drawings of the important diatom genera obtained from this earth illustrate the keenness of observation displayed by Prof. Ghosh. Ghosh and Sen's study furnished a proof of the usefulness of plant microfossils in the correlation of coal seams in those early days. About 52 spore types, 11 types of wood fragments, 31 cuticular types and 8 unknown plant fragments interesting both from correlative and palaeobotanical points of view were described and discussed. The evidence of microfloral assemblage was also regarded to indicate a warm, moist and uniform climate prevailing during the formation of these coal seams. As a sequel and elaboration of the above study Prof. Ghosh in 1953 pointed out a paper entitled "Recent advances on palaeobotany of coal and their application to the scientific and technological utilization of coal" that besides the application of microfossils in the correlation of coal seams, coal palaeobotany has other economic application like determining the nature of coal, determination of horizons and genetic age of the coal, exploration of a known seam is an unknown area across a fault and also amount of crushing necessary from different coal after extraction. Prof. Ghosh and his associates checked the results obtained by Prof. Sahni and his collaborators and found the occurrence of vascular elements even in the Cambrian rocks. But it inspired Prof. Ghosh to further investigate whether vascular plants existed in Cambrian times or not. To collect sufficient evidences, he and A. Bose, his main associate in this study, investigated Cambrian rocks of Punjab Salt Range and Kashmir, Pre-Cambrian rocks of Dharwar and Cuddapah, some Vindhyan rocks and a few Cambrian specimens from North America. From these rocks they obtained wood elements and monolete and trilete types of spores, leading to the conclusion of the fact that their findings were not in agreement with the view of the majority of investigators who did not consider vascular plants to have existed in Pre-Silurian times. Still they had the courage to stand by their own observations, which were also supported by the works of Naumova, Reissinger and Kopeliovitch in Europe and Jacob and his associates in India. In 1969 they again published a paper on the spores of vascular plants obtained from nine samples of Cambrain rocks of North America, further reiterating the existence of vascular plants in the Cambrian. Prof. Ghosh's investigations related with the occurrence of earliest vascular plant led him to have a more critical looks to at all the organic remains reported from Pre-Cambrian deposits. This formed the subject matter of the 43rd Acharya Jagadis Chandra Bose endowment lecture which he delivered in November 1973 under the title "Life in the Proterozoic". In 1956 Prof. Ghosh joined the Oil and Natural Gas Commission and established a palynological laboratory at Dehra Dun. For nearly the next decade his publications were mainly, though not exclusively, in the domain of palaeopalynology with a bearing on stratigraphy. Palynological examination of different samples of various horizons from eastern and south western India by Ghosh and his associates and ONGC revealed that round grains bearing 4 to 11 colpi, scabrate exine having reticulate ornamentation were restricted in Pre-Miocene horizons. They showed comparison with the grains described by Potonie' as Nothofagidites from the Eocene of Burma. A significant phenomenon was observed that the frequency of grains with more colpi increased with the older horizons of the Pre-Miocene formations. The 4th paper gave well illustrated accounts of 15 types of dispersed spores and pollen grains from a few Jurassic - Cretaceous samples of North-Western India. Prof. Ghosh published two comprehensive papers on the role of palynology in oil exploration and one dealing with palynology in relation to stratigraphy in general. Two of his addresses were devoted to special areas of palynology. In the 8th Annual Lecture to the Palynological Society of India delivered in 1973, he dealt with the palynology of the Gondwanas. Later, in his address as a chairman at the first Indian Palynological Congress at Chandigarh (published in 1977) he spoke about the palynology of the Siwaliks. This is by no means is an exhaustive treatment of the entire palaeobotanical work of Prof. A. K. Ghosh but only a brief resume which I have presented on this auspicious occasion when he have all gathered here to honour a great teacher and a devoted scientist. Mr. A. K. Ghosh was registrar at the Bose Research Institute, Calcutta, before his appointment in the ONGC as Palynologist (Sr.) in 1956 and in-charge of the Palynology Laboratory. He was about 53 yrs age. He worked intensely on the palynology of the Vindhyan Series. The age of the Upper Vindhyans is controversial but generally believed as basal Cambrian. They are correlated with the Salt Range Cambrian strata of western Himalayas in Kashmir. Once Ghosh told me that his thesis on the plant remains in Vindhyans completed under the supervision of Professor S. P. Agharkar at Calcutta University was adversely criticized by Professor Birbal Sahni of Lucknow University, who had worked on the Salt Range and was an external examiner for his thesis. Ghosh never resubmitted thesis but worked on Vindhyans most of his life. The presence of fragmentary vascular plant microfossils of the Vindhyans and their correlation with Salt Range could never be reconciled. Thus, Ghosh came in direct controversy with Birbal Sahni whose viewpoints contradicted Ghosh's. Thus, Ghosh came in direct controversy with Birbal Sahni whose viewpoints contradicted Ghosh's. The controversy received global attention and Ghosh became known as " Cambrian Ghosh" worldwide. On his retirement from ONGC in 1962, Ghosh became an emeritus professor in the Botany Department of Calcutta University where he advised several palynology students, e.g., Manju Sharma, A. Nandi. Ghosh had a knack of indulging in controversial problems. He wanted to produce results where others failed. The Krols, exposed as a belt of nappes from east to west in the Himalayas, had tantalized several paleontologists but produced frustratingly few results. In 1959, Ghosh, A. T. R. Raju (an ONGC field geologist-petrologist), and I (Satish Srivastava) collected Precambrian to Jurassic samples, including the Krols, from exposures along a mule-track between Dehradun and Mussoorie. In 1962, Ghosh and I co-authored a paper on the palynology of Krols beds exposed on this tract.


AASP Primary Records Satish Srivastava

www.palynology.org [cached]

Meanwhile A. K. Ghosh joined ONGC as Palynologist-In-Charge.
I worked under the Palynologist-In-Charge, A. K. Ghosh, who had been registrar at the Bose Research Institute, Calcutta, and was about 53 years old. Although Ghosh had to rewrite his thesis, he never resubmitted it, but worked on the Vindhyans for most of his life. The fragmentary plant microfossils of the Vindhyans and the Salt Range could never be reconciled and Ghosh remained in direct controversy with Birbal Sahni. Upon hearing that I worked with Ghosh at ONGC, Potonié exclaimed "Oh! Cambrian Ghosh. Potonié was most courteous and his wife, clad in a white chiken-embroidered [of local fame] sari, greeted me graciously and treated me to candies. Soon I became in Ghosh's good books due to my zeal for publication. I assisted him in preparing his manuscripts and co-authored publications with him. Ghosh had a knack of indulging in controversial problems. I guess he wanted to produce results where others failed. The Krols, exposed as a belt of nappes from east to west in the Himalayas, had tantalized several paleontologists but produced frustratingly few results. In 1959, Ghosh, A. T. R. Raju (an ONGC field geologist-petrologist), and I collected Precambrian to Jurassic samples, including the Krols, from exposures along a mule-track between Dehradun and Mussoorie. This gave me my first taste of field geology. In 1962, Ghosh and I co-authored a paper on the palynology of Krols [ Ghosh, A. K. and Srivastava, S. K. 1962. In 1962, A. K. Ghosh attended the First Palynological Conference in Tucson. He presented a paper on polycolpate pollen grains in the Tertiary of India [ co-authors S. K. Srivastava and J. Sen, published 1963 (1964)] and proposed their affinity with Nothofagus. Our polycolpate paper was in press at the time so Ghosh added a postscript to the galley-proofs that the wide distribution of Nothofagus in Africa, India and Far East during Senonian and Paleocene indicated similar environmental conditions at those times in now widely-separated lands.


Immunology Research Institutes in India | Biotech Support Services (BSS)

biotechsupportbase.com [cached]

A. K. Ghosh and P. K. Ray


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