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This profile was last updated on 9/24/08  and contains information from public web pages.

Founder and Owner

Phone: (866) ***-****  HQ Phone
Local Address: California, United States
B-1rd Llc
69602 Warnock Road
Lostine, Oregon 97857
United States

 
Web References
Getty Pollard, owner of ...
www.theglobeandmail.com, 24 Sept 2008 [cached]
Getty Pollard, owner of B-1RD Inc., a falconry bird abatement company that services E. & J. Gallo Winery's 400-acre Two Rock Vineyard in Sonoma County, Calif., says the price of his services for a 150-acre property would be comparable to that of netting.
Getty Pollard is a falcon ...
www.gingerich.com, 1 July 2006 [cached]
Getty Pollard is a falcon trainer and has developed a service for farmers to protect their valuable fruit from Starlings by using trained falcons.
...
Getty currently owns 30 captive-bred falcons but only travels with a small contingency depending on the amount of acres to be covered. When not working the falcons are in training. Getty utilizes an ATV to cover the entire farm as the falcon soars overhead following him. There is also play time as Pollard swings a leather lure that is attached to a long tether.
...
Verne Gingerich, owner, says "there were flocks of Starlings before Getty and his falcons arrived and now we aren't seeing any.
...
Gingerich Farms Products, located in Canby, in its ongoing effort to incorporate substainable agricultural practices into its operations has brought in Getty Pollard, founder and owner of B-1RD, LLC.
Gingerich Farms Products Inc.
www.oregonblueberries.com, 1 July 2006 [cached]
Gingerich Farms Products, located in Canby, in its ongoing effort to incorporate sustainable agricultural practices into its operations has brought in Getty Pollard, founder and owner of B-1RD, LLC. Getty Pollard is a falcon trainer and has developed a service for farmers to protect their valuable fruit from Starlings by using trained falcons.
...
Getty currently owns 30 captive-bred falcons but only travels with a small contingency depending on the amount of acres to be covered. When not working the falcons are in training. Getty utilizes an ATV to cover the entire farm as the falcon soars overhead following him. There is also play time as Pollard swings a leather lure that is attached to a long tether.
...
Verne Gingerich, owner, says "there were flocks of Starlings before Getty and his falcons arrived and now we aren't seeing any.
"Coincidentally, at around the same time, ...
www.cfgrower.com, 21 Mar 2007 [cached]
"Coincidentally, at around the same time, I got a call from a man named Getty Pollard who offers crop protection using falcons and we elected to try it and see what would happen."Pollard, owner of B-1RD, LLC, Lostine, OR, began his work by evaluating the farm's property to determine how many acres needed to be covered, the topography of the land-whether it was flat, if it had trees or was mostly open field-and conducting a general survey of the environment.Once he had a layout of the land, Pollard decided that he would need around seven weeks to effectively create the predatory presence necessary to stave off the populations of starlings that frequented the farm's blueberry fields."I began to fly my falcons one at a time for several hours at the crack of dawn and again in the evening," said Pollard."The idea is to condition the starlings to believe that there are predators in the area and that they should look for food elsewhere."To achieve this, Pollard flew his falcons in various "modes."Sometimes, he commanded his birds to simply soar over the fields and occasionally, they just sat on perches scattered throughout the property.For groups of starlings that were more resistant to the falcons, he prompted his large birds to flap their wings quickly, to dive as if attacking prey or to chase the starlings, thus displaying more aggressive behaviors.
The falcons worked so well, the farm is currently installing perches throughout its properties.
Pollard and his team of handlers also followed a "loose" formula for determining how long they would fly each bird, factoring in heat and humidity, the intensity of each mode the bird would be asked to display and the relative hunger of individual bird-a figure calculated by weighing the falcon several times a day."There is a lot of training and effort that goes into each bird to elicit these responses and they are rewarded for their behavior with food," he said.
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