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Wrong Georgia Calhoun?

Georgia Calhoun

President

Anniston High School

Email: g***@***.gov

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Anniston High School

Company Description

Anniston offers an array of educational opportunities from a great city system, to private, parochial, vocational, and college preparatory K-12 schools to community colleges. To learn more about Anniston City Schools, please click here. Public schools in A...more

Web References(11 Total References)


www.anniston.org

Georgia Calhoun (Pres.)


southernspaces.org [cached]

Georgia Calhoun, a retired teacher and board member of the Anniston Museum of Natural History, has been pressing for a memorial to the Freedom Riders in Anniston for fifteen years.
Since 1994, when Calhoun first approached the Anniston City Council about supporting a marker, she has met resistance to placing a fitting tribute at the site. Calhoun and Bean, along with State Representative Barbara Boyd and Jacksonville State University (JSU) Environmental Policy Information Center Director (EPIC) Pete Conroy, have been leading an initiative to build a larger memorial at the Freedom Riders site. In denying Georgia Calhoun's earlier request for a memorial, Anniston City Council members insisted the Calhoun County Commission was the appropriate venue to take up the request, since the actual site of the firebombing is in Calhoun County, outside the Anniston city limits. However, no vandalism has taken place at the site of the historical marker, reports Georgia Calhoun. To the contrary, more people are visiting the site on Highway 202 since the plaque was placed, Calhoun explains. Still, she envisions more than a marker at the site, a place where visitors could pull off the highway to stop at the memorial, a place for meditation and for ongoing education. In the current political climate, both Calhoun and Bean are optimistic. 6. Letter from Ann Zito Hooper, of the Calhoun County Grant Office, to Georgia Calhoun, November 25, 2003.


www.annistonstar.com

Anniston’s Black Heritage Festival to honor founder Georgia Calhoun


www.annistonstar.com

Anniston’s Black Heritage Festival to honor founder Georgia Calhoun
Anniston’s Black Heritage Festival to honor founder Georgia Calhoun Anniston’s Black Heritage Festival to honor founder Georgia Calhoun From staff reports Annistonstar.com Georgia Calhoun had a dream. She was serving on the board of the Anniston Museum of Natural History when she realized that too few African-Americans were participating in museum programs. So she had the idea to start a black heritage festival.


www.annistonstar.com

Georgia Calhoun, the founder of the festival, said it was meant to celebrate the heritage of Choccolocco as well as bring the community members together.
"I'm trying to preserve our history," Calhoun said. What is the fire station and community center now, was once the school for black children in Choccolocco, she said. Across the street in what is now a wooded area was the old brickyard that drew her family to the area decades ago. "All the brick that was made in Calhoun County was made here," Calhoun said. "A lot of people came into the community for jobs." The community was founded by Creek Indians, she said, and settlers began to move into the community in 1834. "The settlers built antebellum homes," Calhoun said. Many of them are still occupied, she said. The community is now bordered by Bains Gap Road and Kelly Lynn Road, Calhoun said. Calhoun said the community has probably doubled in size to about 2,500 over the last several years as apartment complexes and new subdivisions have been built.


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