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Wrong George San Miguel?

George L. San Miguel

Natural Resource Manager

National Park Service

HQ Phone:  (501) 396-3000

Direct Phone: (970) ***-****direct phone

Email: g***@***.gov

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

National Park Service

1849 C Street N.W.

Washington, D.C., District of Columbia,20240

United States

Company Description

More than 20,000 National Park Service employees care for America's 413 national parks and work with communities across the nation to help preserve local history and create close-to-home recreational opportunities. The National Park Service has cared for the...more

Web References(42 Total References)


Abstracts - 2006 | Colorado Scientific Society

coloscisoc.org [cached]

George San Miguel, National Park Service, Mesa Verde National Park


Birding Festival: Tour Leaders

cortezculturalcenter.org [cached]

George San Miguel has been the Branch Chief for Natural Resource Conservation and Research Coordinator at Mesa Verde National Park for 17 years.
He has worked for the National Park Service as a biologist and ranger naturalist since 1980 in other parks such as Devils Tower in Wyoming, Big Cypress in Florida, Olympic in Washington, and Sequoia, Kings Canyon, Joshua Tree, and Santa Monica Mountains in California. He has been studying and writing about birds and other wildlife since his college days at UCLA including banding songbirds and shorebirds with the Point Reyes Bird Observatory. Currently he exercises his banding license on hummingbirds at Mesa Verde.


cortezculturalcenter.org

George San Miguel has been the Branch Chief for Natural Resource Conservation and Research Coordinator at Mesa Verde National Park for 15 years.
He has worked for the National Park Service as a biologist and ranger naturalist since 1980 in other parks such as Devils Tower in Wyoming, Big Cypress in Florida, Olympic in Washington, and Sequoia, Kings Canyon, Joshua Tree, and Santa Monica Mountains in California. He has been studying and writing about birds and other wildlife since his college days at UCLA including banding songbirds and shorebirds with the Point Reyes Bird Observatory. Currently he exercises his banding license on hummingbirds at Mesa Verde.


coloscisoc.org

George San Miguel, National Park Service, Mesa Verde National Park


Four Corners Free Press Official Website

fourcornersfreepress.com [cached]

George San Miguel, natural-resource manager at Mesa Verde, agreed that visibility is worsening in the park.
"We're seeing more dirty days. Overall the trend is downward," he said. "It is a highly reactive molecule that when inhaled by a plant leaf or a lung is very damaging to the tissue," said San Miguel. Ozone reduces crop yields and slows the growth of trees, he said. Aspen and yellow pine species such as ponderosa are especially sensitive to ozone. It can also harm wildlife. Mesa Verde's ozone levels have been slowly approaching the federal safety limit. Peak levels have been rising over the years, San Miguel said, and the overall amount of ozone is also going up at the park, "which means even the better days are getting worse." Individual parks don't make statements for or against proposals such as the rules change, San Miguel noted, nor do they come out with positions on projects such as Desert Rock. "Our models have indicated there would be a negative impact from adding another regional sources," San Miguel said, "so the National Park Service as an agency told the EPA that in order for Mesa Verde's air quality to not be impaired, these kinds of offsets would be necessary." San Miguel noted that many sources contribute to pollution. Volatile organic compounds, those contributors to ozone, are produced by everything from vegetation to oil fields. "Volatile organic compounds are both natural and artificial," San Miguel said. "We're all part of the problem," San Miguel said.


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