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Wrong George Rappleyea?

George Washington Rappleyea

Chief Architect

Scopes Trial

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Scopes Trial

Find other employees at this company (38)

Background Information

Employment History

Metallurgical Engineer and the Manager

Cumberland Coal & Iron Company


Web References(10 Total References)


do5.netpage-ues.com

George Rappleyea - GeorgeWashington Rappleyea was a New Yorker who was a metallurgical engineer and the manager of the Cumberland Coal and Iron Company in Dayton, Tennessee in the summer of 1925 when he became the chief architect of the Scopes Trial.
At a meeting at Robinson's Drug Store it was Rappleyea who convinced a group of Dayton businessmen to sponsor a test case of the Butler Act, which prohibited the teaching of evolution in the state's schools, and got John ...


dr67.healthyounger.com

George Rappleyea - George Washington Rappleyea was a New Yorker who was a metallurgical engineer and the manager of the Cumberland Coal and Iron Company in Dayton, Tennessee in the summer of 1925 when he became the chief architect of the Scopes Trial.
At a meeting at Robinson's Drug Store it was Rappleyea who convinced a group of Dayton businessmen to sponsor a test case of the Butler Act, which prohibited the teaching of evolution in the state's schools, and got John T.


southeasttennessee.com [cached]

George Rappleyea, local manager of the Cumberland Coal & Iron Company which was shutting down its coal and ironmaking operations, had read that the American Civil Liberties Union had offered to test the new state law that prohibited the teaching of evolution.


southeasttennessee.com

George Rappleyea, local manager of the Cumberland Coal & Iron Company which was shutting down its coal and ironmaking operations, had read that the American Civil Liberties Union had offered to test the new state law that prohibited the teaching of evolution.


www.tn-tgs.com [cached]

The above-mentioned two streams of thought converged in the mind of one man: George W. Rappleyea, a metallurgical engineer who had come to Tennessee from New York City, married a Dayton girl, and was managing the ailing Cumberland Coal and Iron Company in Dayton.
When Rappleyea read his 4 May 1925 issue of the Chattanooga Daily Times, he saw an article that had the potential of ending Dayton's economic drought and bringing a rain of economic benefits. Rappleyea took the paper and headed for Robinson's Drug Store. Rappleyea showed Robinson the article, which contained an announcement from the New York headquarters of the ACLU that said, in reference to the new Tennessee anti-evolution law, "We are looking for a Tennessee teacher who is willing to accept our services in testing this law in the courts. Accounts compiled over 30-45 years later by various researchers interviewing Robinson, Rappleyea, Scopes, and others disagree so much on specific details that they can be harmonized only on major points. It is at least clear that by May 5th the following met with Doc Robinson at his drug store to discuss a possible test case of the evolution law: Rappleyea, Superintendent of Schools Walter White, lawyer Wallace C. Haggard, city attorneys Herbert B. Hicks and his brother Sue K. Hicks (the original "Boy Named Sue" of the Johnny Cash hit), and John Thomas Scopes.


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