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This profile was last updated on 1/30/14  and contains information from public web pages and contributions from the ZoomInfo community.

Dr. George Perry

Wrong Dr. George Perry?

Beef Reproduction Specialist

Phone: (605) ***-****  HQ Phone
Email: g***@***.edu
South Dakota State University
300 S. Medary Ave. #87
Brookings, South Dakota 57006
United States

Company Description: Founded in 1881, South Dakota State University is the state's largest, most comprehensive institution. This fall SDSU topped its enrollment record for the eighth...   more
Background

Employment History

Education

  • bachelor's degree , animal science
    Texas A&M University
  • doctoral degree , reproductive physiology
    University of Missouri
  • master's degree
    University of Missouri
  • Ph.D.
91 Total References
Web References
George Perry, SDSU Extension ...
www.pioneer-review.com, 30 Jan 2014 [cached]
George Perry, SDSU Extension Beef Reproduction Specialist has been invited. He will highlight research on how management of heifer development can influence fertility. Perry joined SDSU in 2003. He earned his Masters and Doctorate from University of Missouri - Columbia.
...
Julia is survived by her sons, Ronald (Judy) Kopren, Rapid City, SD, Gary (Trish) Kopren, Carefree, AZ, Timothy Kopren, Rapid City, SD and David (Paula) Kopren, Bison, SD; six grandchildren, Ann (Jason) Erpelding, Cary, IL, Mike (Cristina) Kopren, Rapid City, SD, Kristopher Kopren, Portland, OR, Michael Kopren, Chris (Kortney) Seidel and Brad (Kristen) Seidel all of Bison, SD; twelve grandchildren, Alex, Kyle and Erin Erpelding, Cary, IL, Kaylee Matt, Brayden, Caitlyn, and Maya Kopren, Rapid City, SD, Kahlea, Colbin and Kimery Seidel and Olivia and Owen Seidel, all of Bison, SD; one sister, Josephine Sander; three brothers, George (Ella Faye) Deibert, August (Norma) Deibert and Aloyisous "Gene" (Carol) Deibert; and numerous nieces and nephews.
KJJQ - The Ranch AM 910 Area Ag News
theranch910.com, 27 April 2012 [cached]
BROOKINGS, S.D.- Fertility is influenced by many factors, and one of the best methods to look at factors that influence fertility is with the 'Equation of Reproduction,' says George Perry, SDSU Extension Beef Reproductive Management Specialist.
Perry explains that the 'Equation of Reproduction' includes the following four areas:
...
In artificial insemination systems, that opportunity to conceive when a cow is detected in estrus also depends on another limiting factor, "Inseminator Efficiency," Perry says.
Based on research, Perry says that fertilization rates don't differ between animals following natural service or artificial insemination (AI).
He points to a study which flushed embryos following insemination. The data showed that fertilization rates following natural service or artificial insemination (AI) in cattle range from 89 to 100 percent. Furthermore, when pregnancy rates from 13,942 first service artificial inseminations were compared to 6,310 first services by natural service, no difference was detected between artificial insemination and natural service.
"With AI, inseminator efficiency is influenced by semen handling and the ability of the technician to deposit semen in the correct location," Perry said.
To improve semen handling, he encourages cattle producers to have a detailed inventory of semen easily accessible, so that straws may be located and removed from the tank quickly to avoid exposure of semen to ambient temperature.
"When removing a straw from a liquid nitrogen refrigerator, it is imperative that the technician keep the canister, cane and unused semen straws as low as possible in the neck of the tank," Perry said.
He adds that it is best to keep all unused straws below the frost-line in the neck of the tank. The temperature of liquid nitrogen in a semen tank is -196 degrees Celsius (C) (-326 degrees Fahrenheit, (F)). Sperm injury (as judged by sperm motility) occurs at temperatures as warm as -79 C (-110 F), and injury to sperm cannot be corrected by returning semen to the liquid nitrogen.
Site of Deposition
Many studies have compared site of deposition on pregnancy success, says Perry.
"Some studies have reported increased conception rates when semen was deposited in the uterine horns rather than the uterine body, but other studies have reported no difference in fertility when comparing uterine body and uterine horn inseminations," he said. "Furthermore, an inseminator and site of semen deposition interaction has been reported, with evidence of either an increase, decrease, or no effect of uterine horn deposition on conception rate for individual inseminators."
Perry says it is not clear why some studies have shown an advantage following uterine horn insemination while others have not.
"A possible explanation for the positive effect of uterine horn inseminations may be related to the minimization or elimination of cervical semen deposition," he said. "Studies have reported cervical insemination errors account for approximately 20 percent of attempted uterine body depositions, and cervical insemination resulted in at least a 10 percent decrease in fertility when compared with deposition of semen in the uterine body."
Based on this information, Perry says in order to maximize conception rates, AI technicians must continue to manipulate the reproductive tract until the tip of the AI gun is past the cervix and deposition into the uterus can be accomplished.
"Clearly, all AI technicians must develop sufficient skill to recognize when the tip of the AI gun remains in the cervix," he said.
...
Perry says this research reinforces the important role handling plays in conception.
He adds that conception rates are most likely maximized when personnel:
...
For more information related to inseminator efficiency, contact Jim Krantz, SDSU Extension Cow/Calf Field Specialist at jim.Krantz@sdstate.edu or 605-995-7381 or Dr. George Perry, SDSU Extension Beef Reproductive Management Specialist at george.perry@sdstate.edu or 605-688-5456.
...
BROOKINGS, S.D.- Fertility is influenced by many factors, and one of the best methods to look at factors that influence fertility is with the 'Equation of Reproduction,' says George Perry, SDSU Extension Beef Reproductive Management Specialist.
Perry explains that the 'Equation of Reproduction' includes the following four areas:
...
For successful insemination of cattle to occur, animals must be detected in standing estrus, Perry says.
"Detecting standing estrus, which is also referred to as heat detection or detecting standing heat, is simply looking for the changes in animal behavior associated with a cow/heifer standing to be mounted by a bull or another cow/heifer," he said.
Since cows not detected in estrus, and consequently not inseminated in artificial insemination (AI) programs, have no opportunity to conceive, Perry says heat detection becomes the single greatest limiting factor in managing beef cow reproductive programs.
"For successful artificial insemination of cattle to occur, the producer must take the place of the herd bull in detecting the cows/heifers that are ready to be inseminated," Perry said. "Accurate detection of animals in standing estrus is the goal of good estrous detection and plays a vital role in the success of any AI program."
He points to a Colorado State University study in which animals were administered an estrous synchronization protocol, then monitored for standing estrus 24-hours a day with a computer assisted estrus detection system (HeatWatch®) or twice a day for 30 minutes by visual observation.
...
"Accurate detection of estrus can be a difficult and time-consuming activity," Perry said. "Continuous observation of over 500 animals exhibiting natural estrus in three separate studies indicated 55.9 percent of cows initiated standing estrus from 6 p.m. to 6 a.m. (refer to Table 2)," Perry said.
Based on research, Perry encourages producers to observe cows for estrus as often as possible. The research showed that when cows were observed for standing estrus every six hours (6 a.m., noon, 6 p.m., and midnight), estrous detection increased by 10 percent with the addition of a mid-day observation and by 19 percent when observed four times daily (every six hours) compared to detecting standing estrus at 6 a.m. and 6 p.m. alone.
"Therefore, detection of standing estrus can be one of the most time-consuming chores related to artificial insemination," he said.
...
With natural service, Perry says estrous detection is considered to be easy, as it is "the bulls' job.
...
"Libido has a direct affect on pregnancy rate and, as such, it can influence the success of an entire breeding season," Perry said. "Libido can be practically evaluated by closely watching a bull after introducing him to a cow herd and determining his desire to detect cows in estrus."
Although several factors are critical to the success of any well-managed beef reproductive program, estrus detection is one of the most limiting and most time consuming. Without identifying cows in estrus, cows will not have an opportunity to conceive.
For more information related to detecting standing estrus contact, Jim Krantz, SDSU Extension Cow/Calf Field Specialist at jim.Krantz@sdstate.edu or 605-995-7381 or Dr. George Perry, SDSU Extension Beef Reproductive Management Specialist at george.perry@sdstate.edu or 605-688-5456.
...
To listen to a recent iGrow Radio Network interview on this topic with Dr. George Perry, and to review all four articles in this four-part series released by SDSU Extension visit iGrow.org.
Breed heifers before cows South ...
vahs.net, 1 May 2013 [cached]
Breed heifers before cows South Dakota State University Extension | Updated: May 22, 2013| Posted to VAHS Breeding season is fast approaching and it's a good idea to breed heifers to calve two to four weeks ahead of the main cow herd, to give the heifers' time to recover before cycling back for the second breeding season says George Perry, South Dakota State University associate professor and SDSU Extension Beef Reproduction Specialist during a recent iGrow Radio Network interview. "We really need to think about getting heifers bred, before we finish calving or think about breeding our cows," Perry said. He says...
-- George Perry, SDSU ...
www.kansasagconnection.com, 30 Jan 2014 [cached]
-- George Perry, SDSU Extension Beef Reproduction Specialist has been invited. He will highlight research on how management of heifer development can influence fertility. Perry joined SDSU in 2003. He earned his Masters and Doctorate from University of Missouri - Columbia.
"In one study, pregnancy rates from ...
www.agriculture.com, 6 Nov 2013 [cached]
"In one study, pregnancy rates from 13,942 first-service artificial inseminations were compared to 6,310 first services by natural service, and no difference was detected between AI and natural service," says George Perry, South Dakota State University Extension beef reproductive management specialist.
...
"A detailed inventory of semen should be easily accessible, so that straws may be located and removed from the tank quickly to avoid exposing semen to ambient temperature," says Perry.
...
"If only one or two cows are to be bred, you can use a thermos for thawing semen, but be sure to keep an eye on water temperature," says Perry.
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