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Wrong George Perry?

George A. Perry

Professor

South Dakota State University

HQ Phone:  (800) 952-3541

Direct Phone: (605) ***-****direct phone

Email: g***@***.edu

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

South Dakota State University

100 Administration Lane

Brookings, South Dakota,57007

United States

Company Description

About South Dakota State University: Founded in 1881, South Dakota State University is the state's Morrill Act land-grant institution as well as its largest, most comprehensive school of higher education. SDSU confers degrees from six different colleges repres...more

Web References(127 Total References)


May 2013 - Page 2 of 2 - Veterinary Agri-Health Services | Veterinary Agri-Health Services

vahs.net [cached]

Breed heifers before cows South Dakota State University Extension | Updated: May 22, 2013| Posted to VAHS Breeding season is fast approaching and it's a good idea to breed heifers to calve two to four weeks ahead of the main cow herd, to give the heifers' time to recover before cycling back for the second breeding season says George Perry, South Dakota State University associate professor and SDSU Extension Beef Reproduction Specialist during a recent iGrow Radio Network interview.
"We really need to think about getting heifers bred, before we finish calving or think about breeding our cows," Perry said. He says...


Range Beef Cow Symposium

rangebeefcow.com [cached]

Presenter: George Perry, South Dakota State University


Newsroom

www.rangebeefcow.com [cached]

• Post-AI Nutrition by George Perry, Beef Reproductive Management Specialist, South Dakota State University


Schedule

www.rangebeefcow.com [cached]

Post AI Nutrition,George Perry, South Dakota State University


George Perry

www.rangebeefcow.com [cached]

CASPER, Wyo. (Dec. 1, 2009) - How heifers are managed after they are artificially inseminated (AI'ed) can have a significant effect on pregnancy success, reported George Perry, a beef reproduction specialist at South Dakota State University (SDSU).
Perry spoke to beef producers attending the 21st Range Beef Cow Symposium in Casper, Wyo. George Perry Heifer development shouldn't be viewed as just the time from weaning to breeding, SDSU's George Perry emphasized. "Heifer development is what goes on after breeding, too.""Any sudden change in diet following insemination can negatively affect pregnancy success," Perry said, noting research indicates that if nutrition decreases even by as little as 15% after AI, it can affect embryo quality. Perry and his colleagues at SDSU studied heifers developed in feedlot and pasture situations and found that the heifers developed in a feedlot had a higher percentage cycling prior to breeding, but the heifers developed on grass actually had a higher pregnancy success. Perry attributed this to a negative energy crash experienced by the feedlot-developed heifers after the transition from the feedlot to grass immediately following breeding. "When cattle are introduced to a novel environment," he explained, "they try new feedstuffs a little at a time and then increase intake. This period of adjustment can result in a negative gain on heifers, which is what happened to the feedlot-developed heifers when they were put out on pasture for the first time after breeding." To minimize this period of negative energy gain, Perry suggested producers adapt heifers to grass for up to a month before breeding. The heifers can then be drylotted and supplemented for 10 days while AIing, but when they are turned out to grass post-AI, they should not go through the negative gain period. Heifer development shouldn't be viewed as just the time from weaning to breeding, Perry emphasized. "Heifer development is what goes on after breeding, too." He concluded, "We want to manage heifers to stay in the herd and have a long, productive life.


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