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Wrong George Laurer?

George J. Laurer

Engineer

IBM Corporation

HQ Phone:  (914) 499-1900

Direct Phone: (888) ***-****direct phone

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

IBM Corporation

1 New Orchard Rd

Armonk, New York,10504

United States

Company Description

IBM is a globally integrated technology and consulting company headquartered in Armonk, New York. With operations in more than 170 countries, IBM attracts and retains some of the world's most talented people to help solve problems and provide an edge for busin...more

Web References(134 Total References)


Bar code history - Cummings Design

www.cummingsdesign.com [cached]

George Laurer is credited as the inventor of the modern UPC bar code system.
Therefore, in 1971 George Laurer was given the task by IBM management to design the best code and symbol suitable for the grocery industry. In May of 1973, IBM's proposal was accepted. The only changes made by UGPCC was the type font used for the human readable and the ink contrast specification. Following the acceptance of the original UPC specification, George Laurer was asked to find a way to add another digit. The symbol already held twelve, the eleven required by UGPCC and a check digit George Laurer added to achieve the required reliability. The addition of the thirteenth digit could not cause the equipment to require extensive modification. Further, the original domestic version could not be modified. The extra digit would allow for "country identification" and make the UPC worldwide. Again George Laurer found a way to accommodate the requirement and the EAN (European Article Numbering system) symbol was born. Many countries are using the same symbol with their identifying country "flag" (the 13th digit), but chose to call the symbol by other names. An example is JAN (Japanese Article Numbering system), the Japanese version. The symbol has truly become worldwide. In the years since 1973, George Laurer has proposed, and the Uniform Product Code Council, Inc. (formerly UGPCC) has accepted, several other enhancements. Among these enhancements is a price check digit for domestic and another for European markets. There is also an expanded symbol, Version D, which has not yet seen wide use. History of the modern bar code above provided by George Laurer himself. Please be sure to visit George Laurer's web Site. Semi-retired, George continues to consult on UPC bar codes on a freelance basis. George Laurer was inducted into the Innovation Hall of Fame (IHOF) in May 1991 in recognition of his significant inventions and for creating the standard form of the Universal Product Code. A 36-year veteran of the International Business Machines Corporation (IBM) who retired in June of 1987, George Laurer is the holder of 25 patents. He is also the author of 20 published Technical Disclosure Bulletins. During his career, IBM recognized and rewarded him for many technical innovations. He received the prestigious "Raleigh, N.C. Inventor of the Year" award in 1976. In 1980 he was honored with IBM's Corporate Technical Achievement award for his work on the Universal Product Code proposal that was issued in 1970 by McKinsey & Co. and Uniform Grocery Product Code Council, Inc. Before joining IBM, he received the B.S. in electrical engineering form the University of Maryland in 1951. He came to the University after having served in World War II and attending a technical school to learn radio and TV repair. Upon completion of his first year at the technical school, his instructor convinced him that he should not continue that course of study, but that he should go to college.


A Brief History of the Bar Code - Thunderbird Technical Services, Inc.

www.thunderbirdservice.com [cached]

An IBM engineer named George Laurer changed the shape of the bar code, allowing more of the code to fit into a small space on the product.


Lemelson - Con Artist or Inventor? | discussions.idhistory.com

discussions.idhistory.com [cached]

George J. Laurer
Inventor of the U.P.C. Barcode & Symbol


U.P.C. History - The Start - George Laurer

eyeball.idhistory.com [cached]

George Laurer, its inventor, will tell you the story!
On this page hear George Laurer, the principal creator of the IBM proposal, which was the closest to the final one selected, explain how this all happened: George started with IBM in 1951 See and hear George tell the story (running time 2:07) There were many interesting and unique projects prior to the U.P.C. (running time 11:51) since he joined IBM in custom systems. How did George get this assignment and where did the bar concept come from? (running time 7:57) As with many IBM projects, many people play a part in the project. George recounts who was involved. (running time 3:22) George share some of the challenges in the effort (running time 3:58) Everything includes lessons learned. Here is what (running time 2:16) George felt was learned.


Tutorial EAN

idhistory.com [cached]

This Tutorial was created by George Laurer, the creator of the U.P.C. Barcode Symbol.


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