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Wrong George Glastris?

George Glastris

Owner

Edison

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Edison

Belgium

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Background Information

Employment History

Director

Skinner , Inc.


Specialist

Christie


Contributor

Washington Monthly


Web References(21 Total References)


Programs and Events

www.rpwrhs.org [cached]

George Glastris is a specialist in antique scientific, technical, and mechanical instruments and is also very knowledgeable in furniture, decorative arts, toys and collectibles.
He spent ten years as an auction specialist at Christie's London, and then worked at Skinner's in Boston. He now runs his own business, Edison Gallery, in Chicago. He has appeared numerous times on PBS's "Antiques Roadshow" and the History Chanel's "American Pickers". He is the author of Miller's Collecting Science & Technology.


Lunch Box Pad : Superman Lunch Box Soars To $11,500 Record

www.lunchboxpad.com [cached]

In a conversation prior to the auction, George Glastris, the Skinner's specialist who managed the sale, said he was not certain what to expect, especially from the lunch box lots.
But after the auction he summarized the results simply by saying of the lots, "They did what they should have done.


Lunch Box Pad : Why Lunchboxes Reign

www.lunchboxpad.com [cached]

Turns out, this was no ordinary lunch box, says Skinner's collectibles specialist George Glastris.
It was a metal Superman lunch box from 1954. A true classic, he says. "Lunch boxes are such popular collectibles because so many people had them," says Mr. Glastris. "They look great and the selection is broad." Mr. Glastris directed the recent lunch box sale at Skinner, which, in addition to the Superman lunch box, included a wide selection of lunch boxes from the '50s, '60s, and '70s. Superman wasn't the only star, though, says Mr. Glastris.


www.skinnerinc.com

It was from a family estate, and in good, original condition," noted department director George Glastris.
The selection of trains featured a group of Marklin offerings, all found in an attic, led by an H.J. Heinz Co. Box Car that sold for $6,037.50, a Gauge I Congressional Limited Parlor Car that realized $5,462.50, a No. 2047 Goods Station that reached $4,600, and a Gauge I Bridge that went for $2,070. The auction also featured a fine selection of 19th century toys. "It's very difficult to find toys from the 19 th century in good, clean condition," said Glastris.


Hi-Tech Old Computer Collectibles - 1Earth Antiques and Appraisals Magazine

1earth.com.au [cached]

Not really, says George Glastris, director of the Science and Technology department at Boston-based Skinner auctions.Instead, collectors are seeking out early computer prototypes that have a hint of nostalgia and may even serve as a learning tool for those technology buffs, he said."I think people can learn from the old technology ... they learn the history." Mr. Glastris even presided over an auction of the "brain" of the world's first computer."It's one of those things ... you just don't know what it's going to sell for," said Mr. Glastris.Is the demand for computer collectibles that strong?"I think it's growing," he said.Mr. Glastris explained that collectors are interested in historically significant prototypes.For instance, he recently sold a calculator for $10,350.That might easily fetch five figures, says Mr. Glastris.And what about that ENIAC "brain?


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