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Wrong George Foxcroft?

George R. Foxcroft

Professor, Swine Reproductive Physiology Co-Director, NSERC EmbryoGENE Strategic Research Network Leader

Swine Reproductive Physiology/ Reproduction and Breeding Herd Management

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Background Information

Employment History

Faculty Position

University of Nottingham


Affiliations

AVRI Council

Professor, Reproductive Physiology - Swine and Member


Education

BSc

University of Nottingham


PhD

University of Nottingham


Web References(73 Total References)


Phibro Pro.CA

phibropro.ca [cached]

George Foxcroft, Professor, Swine Reproductive Physiology Co-Director, NSERC EmbryoGENE Strategic Research Network Leader, Swine Reproduction-Development Program University of Alberta, Edmonton Hanson Lecture What should we do about flu? Dr.


www.afns.ualberta.ca

George Foxcroft and grad students
George Foxcroft (Left), seen here with his former George Foxcroft, Professor of Swine Reproduction Physiology with the Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, announced his retirement as of July, 2012 after a distinguished career of more than 40 years. Foxcroft joined the University of Alberta in 1988 after receiving both his BSc and PhD from the University of Nottingham where he later held the position of Senior Lecturer in Animal Physiology. Since joining AFNS, he has twice been named Associate Chair (Research), received the Award for Excellence in Genetics and Physiology from the Canadian Society of Animal Science and accepted appointments as an Adjunct Professor with the Department of Physiology, a Tier I Canada Research Chair in Swine Reproductive Physiology and Co-Director of the NSERC EmbryoGENE Strategic Research Network. "The chance to move to Canada in 1988 represented the greatest uncontrolled experiment of our lives," said Foxcroft. "However, by any measure, the success we have enjoyed as a family, as well as the material (establishment of the SRTC) and other legacies of the R&D program it was possible to create, speak volumes about the great opportunities provided by Canada as a country and by AFNS as my professional home over the last 20 years." Between 1989 and 2009, Foxcroft served on a total of seventeen University of Alberta committees. In addition to this enormous commitment, he also led the development of the Swine Research & Technology Centre, served as Scientific Director of the Swine Breeding Management Workshop from 2005-2011 and has played an instrumental role in the planning and delivery of the Allen D. Leman Swine Conference since 1996. Somewhere during the performance of these numerous undertakings, Foxcroft also found the time to publish an astounding 184 peer-reviewed publications and 116 extension publications; an accomplishment that played no small part in the Canadian Hirsch-Index Benchmarking of Academic Research naming him the second highest ranked academic in Canada within the Agricultural Sciences field. As an avid gardener and an ardent curler, Foxcroft should have no problem filling his schedule. For those he leaves in the department however, filling his shoes could prove to be quite a challenge.


www.afns.ualberta.ca

George Foxcroft
Professor Emeritus, Swine Reproductive Physiology/ Reproduction and Breeding Herd Management Email: george.foxcroft@ualberta.ca


www.agcanada.com

benefit the industry, says Dr. George Foxcroft.
Improved assessment of the fertility of commercial AI boars and a move to single-boar AI programs would have significant economic benefit for the swine industry, says Dr. George Foxcroft of the Swine Research and Technology Centre at the University of Alberta. Identification of the most fertile boars would enable lower numbers of sperm per AI dose, allowing the use of techniques such as post-cervical insemination and single, fixed-time insemination, he suggests. Furthermore, Foxcroft believes, using the higher genetic merit of these boars across a greater number of gilts and sows bred would provide substantial benefits to the producer in terms of the performance of terminal line progeny. Foxcroft believes that the industry should move towards single-sire AI. “Simply from the perspective of optimizing breeding herd productivity, a move to single-sire AI programs seems to be justified,†he said. “The very best boars will express their real potential, and overall herd productivity appears to increase. Furthermore, the small percentage of very inferior boars will quickly be identified and can be removed from commercial production.†While new methods of evaluating fertility are currently being developed, in the meantime, ranking boars on the basis of normal production criteria such as farrowing rate and litter size would enable this to take place, he adds. The logical conclusion of Foxcroft’s arguments is to maximize the impact of the most fertile boars with the highest genetic merit by moving towards the use of lower semen doses with single fixed-time AI programs. Commercial trials using hormones to induce ovulation at a fixed time after weaning have shown acceptable results, he notes.


Hypor

www.hypor.com [cached]

Work by Dr. George Foxcroft and his team at the Swine Research and Technology Centre, University of Alberta, has shown that crowding of large numbers of embryos in the uterus and the consequent restriction of nutrient supply can result in low-birthweight litters.


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