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Wrong George Barham?

George Titus Barham

President

LOST HOSPITALS OF LONDON

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

LOST HOSPITALS OF LONDON

3 Camden Grove

Chislehurst, Greater London,BR7 5EH

United Kingdom

Find other employees at this company (3)

Web References(16 Total References)


ezitis.myzen.co.uk

In 1926 some 2 acres of Sudbury Park Farm, almost opposite St John's Church (to which the Misses Copland had also greatly contributed), was conveyed to the Hospital Committee by George Titus Barham , owner of Express Dairies . Financially aided by the King Edward's Hospital Fund , building work began for the new hospital at the end of a cul-de-sac, Eve Road (now Fairview Avenue).
More land belonging to Express Dairies to the west of the Hospital was acquired from Mr Barham, the President of the Hospital, and the 5-Year Plan had been mostly completed when war broke out in 1939.


www.brent-heritage.co.uk [cached]

belonging to Mr.Copland and then to Sir George Barham
Sir George Barham, founder of the Express Dairy, came to live in Sudbury. He purchased the Copland estate in 1895, renaming Sudbury Lodge Barham House.


newsletters.hadas.org.uk [cached]

In 1868 Sheephouse was bought by G. T. Barham, who had founded the Express Dairy Company four years previously.
The old buildings were demolished in 1882 and the new buildings were opened in 1883. When Barham first bought it, the farm consisted of 120 acres. He kept 110 acres in permanent pasture or meadow and 10 acres in arable.


www.irvinleisure.co.uk [cached]

The profits raised from the token £1 entry fee, introduced to maintain the safety of our visitors, will be paid to the Friends of Wembley Hospital in accordance with the wishes of George Barham, founder of Express Dairies who donated this park to Brent in the 1950s and after whom it is, obviously, named. (see elsewhere on this website for his story)


www.irvinleisure.co.uk [cached]

Then in 1895, Sir George Barham came to live in Sudbury, and he bought up the entire estate, decided to live in Sudbury Lodge, and renamed his new home Barham House.
The story of Sir George Barham Let me pause and look at the story of George Barham, who was an important man in the dairy industry. He was the son of a dairyman and formed the Express Country Milk Supply Company in London in 1864. He was a forward thinking man and realised that the milk he was supplying was of a poor quality and recognised that this was because of the disgraceful conditions in which the cattle in London lived. He wanted to provide top quality milk to his customers and so arranged to transport fresh milk into town from the countryside by railway, hence his choice of name "Express Milk Company. Had he used Silverlink he would have named this "The Delayed by an hour Milk Company". In 1865, London's Cattle were virtually wiped out by a plague (again no change there then) and George Barham was the only person who could supply milk to the town. He widened his suppliers' list and was using the railway to bring milk in for over 150 miles. He invented the Milk Churn and developed Chilling Methods to keep the milk fresh, and then built this equipment and sold it to others. In 1882 he renamed the company Express Dairies and by 1885 was bringing 30,000 gallons of milk into London every single night. In 1895, at the same time as he purchased Barham House, he received a Royal Warrant for delivery of Milk Supply and this has been renewed by each and every Monarch right up to the present Queen. Then in 1904, George Barham became the first dairyman ever to be knighted, so his daily deliveries became his knightly deliveries! During the period that George and Titus Barham had owned their home in the area, Sudbury had grown considerably. Therefore George and Titus saw this progressive loss of open spaces and that was why Titus bequeathed the land to the Council to guarantee that local people would always have green spaces to enjoy.


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