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Wrong Geoff Smith?

Geoff Smith

Director

Scotiabank

HQ Phone:  (416) 866-6161

Direct Phone: (416) ***-****direct phone

Email: g***@***.com

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Scotiabank

Scotia Plaza 44 King Street West

Toronto, Ontario,M5H 1H1

Canada

Company Description

Scotiabank is Canada's international bank and a leading financial services provider in North America, Latin America, the Caribbean and Central America, and Asia-Pacific. We are dedicated to helping our 23 million customers become better off through a broad ran...more

Background Information

Employment History

Director Risk Management

C&S Wholesale Grocers Inc


Director Risk Management

C&S Wholesale Grocers


Content Manager

McCann Worldgroup


Intern

Bizsmith.ca


Senior Vice President of Risk Management

TD Banknorth Inc.


Associate Director

UBS Inc


Assistant Service Manager East Region

Brunswick Corporation


Vice President, Risk Management

Iron Mountain Incorporated


Affiliations

TD Bank

Succession Planning Officer


TD Waterhouse Canada Inc.

Financial Advisor


TD Canada Trust

Financial Advisor


TD Waterhouse Inc

Business Succession Advisor


Web References(3 Total References)


www.propertycasualty360.com

When Geoffrey Smith joined the risk management team at Iron Mountain in 2008, it was clear that the company required a sea change when it came to its workers' compensation program.
"She didn't know the first thing about workers' compensation," says Smith. "But that was what I wanted. When an employee was injured, it was this person's job to call him or her and find out what happened and what Iron Mountain could do to help. "It's basically just making that first connection so that the employee realizes that, 'Oh, I'm not just going to go home and sit on the couch for two weeks,'" Smith says. "It's a very hands-on approach, which I think a lot of companies don't necessarily do." Making that initial connection with its injured employees sends a message that the company cares and wants to help them get back to work as soon as possible, instead of simply giving them a check and leaving them to wait around while they recover. "We're not just opening up the piggy bank saying, 'Whatever hurts, we're going to fix it for you,'" says Smith. "If you're hurt on the job, we're going to get you the medical attention that you need from quality medical providers, and we're going to help you get back to work. And we're going to expect you to work with us to get back to work. If work is not available in a facility within the employee's work restrictions, Iron Mountain will work with an outside vendor to let injured employees work in a local not-for-profit agency, such as the American Council for the Blind or the United Way Food Bank, so they can stay active. Injured employees are also getting calls from two claims specialists, a nurse case manager on staff, and their department supervisors, all incentivized to help employees keep working. "Now their supervisor is getting charged $3,500 for every accident, and if there's lost time involved, it's a $15,000 charge," says Smith. "And if they lose more than 30 days, it's $40,000. So now they're on the phone with us and with the employee." Not surprisingly, helping employees return to work as quickly as possible also helps keep litigation costs down. "People sit on the couch at home and they see the daytime TV ad from the attorney's office saying, 'Hurt on the job?'" says Smith, who understands that there's no shortage of attorneys looking to make a quick buck by settling cases out of court with a besieged employer. By getting employees back to work, the company is avoiding many of these incidences. Smith says the new approach also helps reduce the number of fraudulent claims, without treating employees like criminals. The previous claims manager's approach was to hand cases off to the insurance carrier, Smith says, and if there was any lost time involved, an investigator was hired. For the most part, though, Smith says workplace injuries are preventable. So along with better claims management, he and his team are also working to drive down workers' comp costs by establishing a better safety environment across its operations. Smith says by making workplace safety a part of every employees' day-to-day life, the number of injuries can be greatly reduced. "I think if you went to our employees now, they would tell you, 'This is our safety program,' and they'd be proud of that," says Smith. "But we want to take them to the next level in the next few years [to say], 'This is just the way I do my job.' That it becomes part of their operating sense of what they do." Claim incidence per 100 full-time employees has dropped from 30-plus in 2009 to under 7.5. One of the safety initiatives Iron Mountain is exploring is incentives for complying with safety audits and risk-reduction efforts. Instead of billing supervisors based on claims, Smith ponders, "what if we billed them back on some sort of behavioral aspects? "Then it follows up with the supervisor on preset process schedules to say, 'Have you put in this information?' 'Do you have this known yet?'" Smith explains. "So it's a smart system as well as just a data warehouse. I expect it to continue to help us drive down our costs." And costs have been on a downward trend since implementing all these changes-by more than half. "If you took $18 million 2008 and brought it up to today's value, it'd probably be close to $20 million," says Smith. Right now, Iron Mountain's costs are closer to $9 million-and are trending downward. "I think the one thing that really has made our program successful has been the commitment and the willingness of senior management to listen and be involved and supportive of the claims effort and the safety effort of this company," he continues. Geoffrey Smith 2


www.propertycasualty360.com [cached]

When Geoffrey Smith joined the risk management team at Iron Mountain in 2008, it was clear that the company required a sea change when it came to its workers' compensation program.
"She didn't know the first thing about workers' compensation," says Smith. "But that was what I wanted. When an employee was injured, it was this person's job to call him or her and find out what happened and what Iron Mountain could do to help. "It's basically just making that first connection so that the employee realizes that, 'Oh, I'm not just going to go home and sit on the couch for two weeks,'" Smith says. "It's a very hands-on approach, which I think a lot of companies don't necessarily do." Making that initial connection with its injured employees sends a message that the company cares and wants to help them get back to work as soon as possible, instead of simply giving them a check and leaving them to wait around while they recover. "We're not just opening up the piggy bank saying, 'Whatever hurts, we're going to fix it for you,'" says Smith. "If you're hurt on the job, we're going to get you the medical attention that you need from quality medical providers, and we're going to help you get back to work. And we're going to expect you to work with us to get back to work. If work is not available in a facility within the employee's work restrictions, Iron Mountain will work with an outside vendor to let injured employees work in a local not-for-profit agency, such as the American Council for the Blind or the United Way Food Bank, so they can stay active. Injured employees are also getting calls from two claims specialists, a nurse case manager on staff, and their department supervisors, all incentivized to help employees keep working. "Now their supervisor is getting charged $3,500 for every accident, and if there's lost time involved, it's a $15,000 charge," says Smith. "And if they lose more than 30 days, it's $40,000. So now they're on the phone with us and with the employee." Not surprisingly, helping employees return to work as quickly as possible also helps keep litigation costs down. "People sit on the couch at home and they see the daytime TV ad from the attorney's office saying, 'Hurt on the job?'" says Smith, who understands that there's no shortage of attorneys looking to make a quick buck by settling cases out of court with a besieged employer. By getting employees back to work, the company is avoiding many of these incidences. Smith says the new approach also helps reduce the number of fraudulent claims, without treating employees like criminals. The previous claims manager's approach was to hand cases off to the insurance carrier, Smith says, and if there was any lost time involved, an investigator was hired. For the most part, though, Smith says workplace injuries are preventable. So along with better claims management, he and his team are also working to drive down workers' comp costs by establishing a better safety environment across its operations. Smith says by making workplace safety a part of every employees' day-to-day life, the number of injuries can be greatly reduced. "I think if you went to our employees now, they would tell you, 'This is our safety program,' and they'd be proud of that," says Smith. "But we want to take them to the next level in the next few years [to say], 'This is just the way I do my job.' That it becomes part of their operating sense of what they do." Claim incidence per 100 full-time employees has dropped from 30-plus in 2009 to under 7.5. One of the safety initiatives Iron Mountain is exploring is incentives for complying with safety audits and risk-reduction efforts. Instead of billing supervisors based on claims, Smith ponders, "what if we billed them back on some sort of behavioral aspects? "Then it follows up with the supervisor on preset process schedules to say, 'Have you put in this information?' 'Do you have this known yet?'" Smith explains. "So it's a smart system as well as just a data warehouse. I expect it to continue to help us drive down our costs." And costs have been on a downward trend since implementing all these changes-by more than half. "If you took $18 million 2008 and brought it up to today's value, it'd probably be close to $20 million," says Smith. Right now, Iron Mountain's costs are closer to $9 million-and are trending downward. "I think the one thing that really has made our program successful has been the commitment and the willingness of senior management to listen and be involved and supportive of the claims effort and the safety effort of this company," he continues.


www.propertycasualty360.com [cached]

When Geoffrey Smith joined the risk management team at Iron Mountain in 2008, it was clear that the company required a sea change when it came to its workers' compensation program.


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