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Wrong Freeland Dunker?

Freeland Dunker

Senior Veterinarian

San Francisco Zoo

HQ Phone:  (415) 753-7080

Direct Phone: (415) ***-****direct phone

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

San Francisco Zoo

1 Zoo Road

San Francisco, California,94132

United States

Company Description

At the San Francisco Zoo, we believe that people have the intelligence and compassion to turn the current extinction and environmental crisis around; they just need some help to get motivated. That's why we have made it our goal to inspire our one million annu...more

Background Information

Employment History

Veterinarian

California Academy of Sciences


Web References(26 Total References)


Member Vets : Protect The Pets

protectthepets.com [cached]

Dr. Freeland Dunker
San Francisco Zoological Gardens | San Francisco, CA 415.753.2485 | www.sfzoo.org


www.sfgate.com

WHAT I DO: Freeland Dunker, California Academy of Sciences Veterinarian
Dr. Freeland Dunker has also been a vet at the S.F. Zoo, where a giraffe once gave him a black eye. Photo: Paul Chinn, The Chronicle Dr. Freeland Dunker has also been a vet at the S.F. Zoo, where a giraffe once gave him a black eye. Dr. Freeland Dunker has also been a vet at the S.F. Zoo, where a... When a shoe falls into an open-top tank and an alligator swallows it, veterinarian Freeland Dunker finds a way to retrieve it. When tropical fish called prochilodus are introduced to an exhibit tank, he isolates the predatory redtail catfish in a holding tank, lets the newcomers adjust and slowly reintroduces the predators. Dunker spent 20 years at the San Francisco Zoo, and in 2008 moved to the Steinhart Aquarium at the California Academy of Sciences when the facility was rebuilt and its animal collection expanded. Dunker, 58, grew up in Burbank and studied natural resources management at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo and veterinary science at UC Davis. He lives in Pacifica with his wife, Jackie, a veterinary technician, and their sons, Nick and Thomas, 19 and 15. When a shoe falls into an open-top tank and an alligator swallows it, veterinarian Freeland Dunker finds a way to retrieve it. When tropical fish called prochilodus are introduced to an exhibit tank, he isolates the predatory redtail catfish in a holding tank, lets the newcomers adjust and...


blog.protectthepets.com

Dr. Freeland Dunker, San Francisco Zoo, San Francisco, CA


www.protectthepets.org

Dr. Freeland DunkerSan Francisco Zoological Gardens | San Francisco, CA415.753.2485 | www.sfzoo.org


HKRAS Herp News: Baseball-sized bladder stone removed from zoo's tortoise

hkras.org [cached]

Dr. Freeland Dunker, San Francisco Zoo's head veterinarian, examines one of the bladder stones he removed from Cactus, the desert tortoise.
The reptile returned to public display this week after undergoing an unusual operation in which the zoo's head vet, Dr. Freeland Dunker, had to cut into his shell. "We faced a unique challenge," Dunker said Tuesday. "In a mammal, bird or anything else without a shell, this would be fairly routine surgery." One stone was the size of a baseball and the other three were as big as golf balls. They added up to 553 grams, a little over a pound -- which is a lot for an animal like Cactus, who normally weighs 8 pounds and enjoys eating his namesake. Dunker discovered the stones in 1994 and has monitored them over the years. During last week's 90-minute operation on Cactus, Dunker cut a 3-by-4- inch rectangle in the tortoise's plastron, or underbelly shell, partially scoring the flap closest to the head. "I hinged it and left it up like the hood of a car," Dunker said. "Then we had our starting point." After removing the stones, he applied a fiberglass patch and sealed it with five-minute epoxy. It will take two years to heal. "It was like fixing a ding in a surfboard," said Dunker, who performed a similar operation in 1992 on a tortoise from San Francisco's Randall Museum. "Tortoises, being a desert animal, use their bladders as a canteen for water exchange," Dunker said. "They recirculate it through their bladder. This urine can get stagnant, especially after drought or hibernation." He said that wild tortoises will urinate as a defense when they're picked up and often die as a result, after losing all their water. If it cracks during the two-year healing period, Dunker will reinforce it. And it will be with Cactus for the rest of his life, just like the one that fellow zoo resident Helga received years ago after her shell was sliced open to deal with another byproduct of tortoise anatomy: Her eggs were blocked and rotting inside her body. "Now she's shiny underneath," Dunker said.


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