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This profile was last updated on 6/1/13  and contains information from public web pages and contributions from the ZoomInfo community.

Prof. Frederick Pilcher

Wrong Prof. Frederick Pilcher?
Illinois College
1101 W. College Ave
Jacksonville , Illinois 62650
United States

Company Description: Find great deals on hotels close to Illinois College in Jacksonville, IL, book online and save!
Background

Employment History

Board Memberships and Affiliations

19 Total References
Web References
News Archive
britastro.org, 24 June 2010 [cached]
Minor Planet Lightcurve Data collected by Frederick Pilcher , a member of The Astronomical Society of Las Cruces
ASLC member, Frederick ...
spwyh.aslc-nm.org, 28 July 2011 [cached]
ASLC member, Frederick Pilcher, uses a 14 inch telescope and CCD camera to obtain images from a particular minor planet for several nights. He uses special software to calculate the change in brightness of the minor planet compared with nearby stars, and constructs a lightcurve from the results. The resulting curve helps to define the rotational period of the asteroid and also provides information regarding its shape.
ASLC is proud to host the results of Fred's Minor Planet Studies. Click here or on the light curve thumbnail above to access his Minor Planet Light Curve data.
- contributed by Fred Pilcher
Minor Planet Alerts « Minor Planets Section
www.alpo-astronomy.org, 23 Oct 2013 [cached]
Frederick Pilcher ALPO Minor Planets Section Coordinator
...
Prof Pilcher is also in this list of 9 members. We were contacted for ideas and suggestions in 2010 for this mission. I have a great talk with Dolores and she hopes to work with us again.
...
Frederick Pilcher ALPO Minor Planets Section Coordinator
...
the interest and resources to monitor this event to contact Frederick Pilcher at pilcher@ic.edu
Davis | News
www.davisnet.com, 1 Sept 2003 [cached]
Frederick Pilcher, of the Physics Department of Illinois College in Jacksonville, IL, wrote to tell us he thinks the whole Mars Mania thing was a bit overdone. While he agrees that Mars was closest to the Earth on August 27, he asserts that the degree of that closeness is relatively unexciting.
"There is more to the story," wrote Frederick. "The eccentricity of Mars' orbit changes cyclically over a time interval of several tens of thousands of years. The eccentricity is now increasing. This makes the closest distance between Mars and Sun, and therefore between Earth orbit and Mars orbit, slowly decrease, less now than in the past 59,619 years. By contrast, as the minimum distance between the two orbits continues to decrease, we will have an even closer approach in about another 200 years."
Frederick, never one to underestimate our readers' love for accuracy, goes on to say that "the significance of this 'closest' approach is overblown. Approaches within 60 million kilometers occur every 15 to 17 years, and the visibility of Mars through smaller telescopes is nearly as good as at the current close approach. For northern hemisphere viewers, the view in September 1988 at slightly greater distance was even better than what we are now enjoying because Mars was much higher in the sky and viewed through a smaller column of distorting air currents."
Frederick concludes that "it is every 15 to 17 years, not every 60,000 years, that an extremely close approach to Mars warrants, and receives, the great observational attention now being directed to this planet. Thanks, Frederick!
Davis | News
www.davisnet.com, 1 Sept 2003 [cached]
Frederick Pilcher, of the Physics Department of Illinois College in Jacksonville, IL, wrote to tell us he thinks the whole Mars Mania thing was a bit overdone.While he agrees that Mars was closest to the Earth on August 27, he asserts that the degree of that closeness is relatively unexciting.
"There is more to the story," wrote Frederick."The eccentricity of Mars' orbit changes cyclically over a time interval of several tens of thousands of years.The eccentricity is now increasing.This makes the closest distance between Mars and Sun, and therefore between Earth orbit and Mars orbit, slowly decrease, less now than in the past 59,619 years.By contrast, as the minimum distance between the two orbits continues to decrease, we will have an even closer approach in about another 200 years."
Frederick, never one to underestimate our readers' love for accuracy, goes on to say that "the significance of this ‘closest' approach is overblown.Approaches within 60 million kilometers occur every 15 to 17 years, and the visibility of Mars through smaller telescopes is nearly as good as at the current close approach.For northern hemisphere viewers, the view in September 1988 at slightly greater distance was even better than what we are now enjoying because Mars was much higher in the sky and viewed through a smaller column of distorting air currents."
Frederick concludes that "it is every 15 to 17 years, not every 60,000 years, that an extremely close approach to Mars warrants, and receives, the great observational attention now being directed to this planet."Thanks, Frederick!
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