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This profile was last updated on 9/18/13  and contains information from public web pages and contributions from the ZoomInfo community.

Dr. C. Frank Starmer

Wrong Dr. C. Frank Starmer?

Professor

National University of Singapore
15 Kent Ridge Drive
Philadelphia, 119245
Singapore

Company Description: A leading global university centred in Asia, the National University of Singapore (NUS) is Singapore's flagship university which offers a global approach to...   more
Background

Employment History

  • Professor of Computer Science and Experimental Medicine (Cardiology)
    Duke University
  • Associate Dean for Learning Technologies and Professor of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics
    Duke University
  • Associate Provost for Information Technology
    Medical University of South Carolina
  • Associate Dean , Learning Technology
    Duke-NUS Graduate
  • Professor and Associate Dean for Learning Technologies
    Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School Singapore
  • Professor and Associate Dean for Learning Technologies
    Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School
  • Visiting Professor
    Institute of Theoretical and Expermental Biophysics, Pushchino Russia

Board Memberships and Affiliations

Education

  • Ph.D.
60 Total References
Web References
Computer Science - Duke University
files.fangengine.org, 28 Mar 2010 [cached]
Frank Starmer Duke CS Image Professor Emeritus of Computer Science
"Building the Arthur Ravenel Bridge: A ...
www.charleston.net, 14 Oct 2007 [cached]
"Building the Arthur Ravenel Bridge: A Photographic Essay" will feature 30 photographs by Dr. C. Frank Starmer, who documented the entire construction process of the Arthur Ravenel Bridge and the demolition of the two older bridges that spanned Charleston Harbor between Mount Pleasant and Charleston.
...
"I got to know Frank when he was on the faculty at MUSC and he started a Web site on the demolition of the old bridges (the Grace Memorial and Pearman) and traced the entire process for two years," says Greenberg.
...
Starmer is associate dean for learning technologies and professor of biostatistics and bioinformatics at Duke University and also at the Duke-National University of Singapore Graduate Medical School.As he now lives in Singapore, Starmer will not be present for the opening.
Vulnerability of cardiac dynamics - Scholarpedia
www.scholarpedia.org, 3 June 2012 [cached]
C. Frank Starmer (2007), Scholarpedia, 2(11):1847.
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1.00 - C. Frank Starmer
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C. Frank Starmer, Duke - NUS Graduate Medical School Singapore
Figure 1: Each propagating excitation wave is trailed by a region of recovering cells.
...
For example, use-dependent drugs that bind to cardiac sodium channels reduce the density of sodium channels and retard the recovery of excitability (Starmer, C.F., Lastra, A.A., Nesterenko, V.V. and Grant, A.O. 1991; Starmer, C.F., Lancaster, A.R., Lastra, A.A. and Grant. A.O., 1992)resulting in slowed conduction. Similarly sodium channel mutations that alter cardiac excitability have an enhanced proarrhythmic potential (Grant, A.O., et. al, 2002; Starmer, C.F., Colatsky, T.J. and Grant, A.O., 2003a). Clinical trials of antiarrhythmic drugs have uniformly revealed that use-dependent drugs that reduce excitability by binding to cardiac sodium channels display proarrhythmic behavior, i.e. there is an increase in the rate of sudden cardiac death associated with the use of drugs classified as antiarrhythmic (see Cardiac Arrhythmia Suppression Trial (CAST) Investigators, 1989; The Cardiac Arrhythmia Suppression Trial-II Investigators, 1992). The mechanism of failure of these clinical trials is consistent with the concept of the vulnerable region described above. Specifically any drug that reduces the excitability will also slow propagation of a wave thereby enlarging the vulnerable region and the probability that spontaneous oscillation of cells within the vulnerable region will trigger a reentrant arrhythmia (Wiener, N. and Rosenblueth, A, 1946; Starmer et. al, 1991, Starmer et. al, 1993, Starobin, J., Zilberter, Y.I. and Starmer, C.F., 1994).
...
Whitcomb, D.C., Gilliam, F.R., Starmer, C.F. and Grant, A.O. Marked QRS complex abnormalities and sodium channel blockade by propoxyphene reversed with lidocaine. Journal of Clinical Investigation 1989; 84:1629-1636. Starmer, C.F., Lastra, A.A., Nesterenko, V.V. and Grant, A.O. A proarrhythmic response to sodium channel blockade: Theoretical model and numerical experiments. Circulation 1991; 84:1364-1377. Starmer, C.F., Lancaster, A.R., Lastra, A.A. and Grant. A.O. Cardiac instability amplified by use-dependent Na channel blockade. American Journal of Physiology 1992; 262:H1305-H1310. Nesterenko, V.V., Lastra, A.A., Rosenshtraukh, L.V. and Starmer, C.F.
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Gomez-Gesteira, M., Fernandez-Garcia, G., Munuzuri, A.P., Perez-Munuzuri, V., Krinsky, V.I., Starmer, C.F. and Perez-Villar, V. Vulnerability in an excitable Belousov-Zhabotinsky medium: from 1D to 2D. Physica D 1994; 76:359-368. Starobin, J., Zilberter, Y.I. and Starmer, C.F. Vulnerability in one-dimensional excitable media. Physica D. 1994; 70:321-341.
...
Starmer, C.F.,Romashko, D.,Reddy, R.S., Zilberter, Y.I., Starobin, J., Grant, A.O. and Krinsky, V.I. Proarrhythmic Response to Potassium Channel Blockade: Numerical Studies of Polymorphic Tachyarrhythmias. Circulation 1995; 92:595-605.
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Grant, A.O., Carboni, M.P., Neplioueva, V., Starmer, C.F., Memmi, M., Napolitano, C. and Priori, S. Long QT, Brugada and conduction system disease linked to a single Na channel mutation. J. Clin Invest. 2002; 110:1201-1209. Starmer, C.F., Colatsky, T.J. and Grant, A.O. What happens when cardiac Na channels lose their function? 1: Numerical studies of the vulnerable period in tissue expressing mutant channels. Cardiovascular Research 2003a; 57:82-91. Starmer, C.F., Grant, A.O. and Colatsky, T.J.
...
C. Frank Starmer (2007) Initiation of excitation waves. Scholarpedia, 2(2):1848.
The Post and Courier | Charleston.net | News | Charleston, SC
www.ravenelbridge.net, 1 Mar 2007 [cached]
But Starmer, who joined MUSC seven years ago from Duke University, is making the point that he's succeeded without being a computer whiz of Bill Gatesian proportions, master politician, sports figure, movie star or hip-hop artist. Thanks in part to the Internet -- which he sees as a great equalizer -- Starmer is a known quantity in circles as disparate as India and Pennsylvania.
The Discovery Channel a few years back stumbled onto his Internet site's digital photo catalog and entertaining descriptions of a banana spider's 12-foot web in the back yard of his Ashley Avenue home, which is within walking distance of Cannon Place.
The cable network featured his findings about the unusual spider, which spins silk that is the strongest substance in nature.
Then one August day in 2003, Starmer took a few pictures of the bridge construction from the S.C. Aquarium to help his grandkids, ages 7, 5, and 3, keep track of what's happening. It grew into a regular routine, snapping shots from the same spot at the neighboring IMAX Theatre dock and, more recently, from the "old" bridge -- a practice he started after jogging over the span while being without a car one week.
"I'm in the science business," said Starmer, who is a professor of biostatistics, bioinformatics, epidemiology and cardiology. "You look at standardized images and document change. That's why he rises at 7 a.m. Sunday to jog across the old bridge, picking a time when there isn't much traffic. "The Mount Pleasant police stopped me once," he said. They weren't concerned with the running or photography, but his safety. So they offered to trail him. "That's great! he said.
Not long after Starmer posted his first bridge photos, his bridge Web pages were discovered.
...
The Internet isn't Starmer's only project. He and wife Ellen have traveled extensively. He spent a year in the early 1990s at the Indian Institute of Technology in Madras, where his four children kept tabs via the computer. For six months in 1997, he lived in Greece on a Fulbright scholarship.
Starmer traveled to the former Soviet Union close to 20 years ago because of the country's interest in drugs that controlled heart rhythms -- a computer-oriented research project he worked on at Duke since pre-PC days. Despite the "Evil Empire" reputation, the Soviet people were warm and friendly, he said. "I saw different cultures had different ways of looking at the same issue," he said.
...
Locally, Starmer has teamed with teachers at E.L. Frierson Elementary School on Wadmalaw Island to help them pick up tips on how to observe the world.
...
"I enjoy solving problems as a puzzle," Starmer said in e-mailed comments that complemented a recent face-to-face interview.
...
If Starmer didn't understand something about spiders, the bridge or other things, he would post a question on his Web site. Invariably, someone would e-mail him. He's heard from civil engineers as far away as Malaysia and the Federal Highway Administration. In the past few months, he added a blog, where he writes down his impressions of the bridge.
Sometimes, Google alone would ferret out the answer. One day, he photographed conical-shaped objects punched in concrete on the new bridge.
He typed in something generic, "concrete testing cones.
...
Via e-mail and Web posts, Starmer struck up online ties with officers at the Department of Transportation, project managers Tidewater Skanska and Palmetto Bridge Constructors, and cable builder Freyssinet. The S.C. Department of Transportation arranged for him to ride up on the new roadway, tour the bridge and snap hundreds of photos.
"All those companies opened doors," he said.
A natural extension of Starmer's online pages has been his digital camera. He began taking digital images not so much as a hobby but because of their improved ability to preserve moments. His first experiments were on the coast of Mexico photographing octopus and other underwater marine life.
...
Starmer is trained as an electrical engineer. He joined the Duke faculty after working on campus with the local telephone company. He met his wife while at Duke and spent 32 years at the Durham, N.C., university before relocating to MUSC in 1998. He made the move through indirect connections with school President Dr. Ray Greenberg, whom he knew through a cancer registry program he was involved with at Emory University in Atlanta.
The associate provost said his precocious nature can be traced to his youth in Greensboro, N.C., in particular the influence of his father, Charles Starmer, an engineer for a company that designed and installed elevators. He put it this way in a recent blog:
...
Starmer was able to return the favor of his father's vision.
...
Until recently, Charles Starmer took care of putting all the photos online, where they were displayed on one long Web page. "It took forever for Dad to download pictures," he said. Starmer has since resorted to multiple pages to make it easier to navigate, developed a more streamlined way to load photos and has added text and even explanatory definitions on bridge parts. "I've redesigned the site four or five times," he said.
If Starmer had his druthers, he would make his Web site interactive.
There's no direct two-way communication; he has to post questions and hope readers will send answers. Even so, he is pleased with his Internet efforts.
"I think the time has come," he said, "that good (Internet) skills and searching are (necessary) tools for the academic world."
C. Frank Starmer
BIRTH DATE AND PLACE: Sept. 4, 1941, Greensboro, N.C.
...
Attribution: C. Frank Starmer from http://ravenelbridge.net
The Post and Courier | Charleston.net | News | Charleston, SC
www.graceandpearmanbridge.org, 23 April 2007 [cached]
But Starmer, who joined MUSC seven years ago from Duke University, is making the point that he's succeeded without being a computer whiz of Bill Gatesian proportions, master politician, sports figure, movie star or hip-hop artist. Thanks in part to the Internet -- which he sees as a great equalizer -- Starmer is a known quantity in circles as disparate as India and Pennsylvania.
The Discovery Channel a few years back stumbled onto his Internet site's digital photo catalog and entertaining descriptions of a banana spider's 12-foot web in the back yard of his Ashley Avenue home, which is within walking distance of Cannon Place.
The cable network featured his findings about the unusual spider, which spins silk that is the strongest substance in nature.
Then one August day in 2003, Starmer took a few pictures of the bridge construction from the S.C. Aquarium to help his grandkids, ages 7, 5, and 3, keep track of what's happening. It grew into a regular routine, snapping shots from the same spot at the neighboring IMAX Theatre dock and, more recently, from the "old" bridge -- a practice he started after jogging over the span while being without a car one week.
"I'm in the science business," said Starmer, who is a professor of biostatistics, bioinformatics, epidemiology and cardiology. "You look at standardized images and document change. That's why he rises at 7 a.m. Sunday to jog across the old bridge, picking a time when there isn't much traffic. "The Mount Pleasant police stopped me once," he said. They weren't concerned with the running or photography, but his safety. So they offered to trail him. "That's great! he said.
Not long after Starmer posted his first bridge photos, his bridge Web pages were discovered.
...
The Internet isn't Starmer's only project. He and wife Ellen have traveled extensively. He spent a year in the early 1990s at the Indian Institute of Technology in Madras, where his four children kept tabs via the computer. For six months in 1997, he lived in Greece on a Fulbright scholarship.
Starmer traveled to the former Soviet Union close to 20 years ago because of the country's interest in drugs that controlled heart rhythms -- a computer-oriented research project he worked on at Duke since pre-PC days. Despite the "Evil Empire" reputation, the Soviet people were warm and friendly, he said. "I saw different cultures had different ways of looking at the same issue," he said.
...
Locally, Starmer has teamed with teachers at E.L. Frierson Elementary School on Wadmalaw Island to help them pick up tips on how to observe the world.
...
"I enjoy solving problems as a puzzle," Starmer said in e-mailed comments that complemented a recent face-to-face interview.
...
If Starmer didn't understand something about spiders, the bridge or other things, he would post a question on his Web site. Invariably, someone would e-mail him. He's heard from civil engineers as far away as Malaysia and the Federal Highway Administration. In the past few months, he added a blog, where he writes down his impressions of the bridge.
Sometimes, Google alone would ferret out the answer. One day, he photographed conical-shaped objects punched in concrete on the new bridge.
He typed in something generic, "concrete testing cones.
...
Via e-mail and Web posts, Starmer struck up online ties with officers at the Department of Transportation, project managers Tidewater Skanska and Palmetto Bridge Constructors, and cable builder Freyssinet. The S.C. Department of Transportation arranged for him to ride up on the new roadway, tour the bridge and snap hundreds of photos.
"All those companies opened doors," he said.
A natural extension of Starmer's online pages has been his digital camera. He began taking digital images not so much as a hobby but because of their improved ability to preserve moments. His first experiments were on the coast of Mexico photographing octopus and other underwater marine life.
...
Starmer is trained as an electrical engineer. He joined the Duke faculty after working on campus with the local telephone company. He met his wife while at Duke and spent 32 years at the Durham, N.C., university before relocating to MUSC in 1998. He made the move through indirect connections with school President Dr. Ray Greenberg, whom he knew through a cancer registry program he was involved with at Emory University in Atlanta.
The associate provost said his precocious nature can be traced to his youth in Greensboro, N.C., in particular the influence of his father, Charles Starmer, an engineer for a company that designed and installed elevators. He put it this way in a recent blog:
...
Starmer was able to return the favor of his father's vision.
...
Until recently, Charles Starmer took care of putting all the photos online, where they were displayed on one long Web page. "It took forever for Dad to download pictures," he said. Starmer has since resorted to multiple pages to make it easier to navigate, developed a more streamlined way to load photos and has added text and even explanatory definitions on bridge parts. "I've redesigned the site four or five times," he said.
If Starmer had his druthers, he would make his Web site interactive.
There's no direct two-way communication; he has to post questions and hope readers will send answers. Even so, he is pleased with his Internet efforts.
"I think the time has come," he said, "that good (Internet) skills and searching are (necessary) tools for the academic world."
C. Frank Starmer
BIRTH DATE AND PLACE: Sept. 4, 1941, Greensboro, N.C.
...
Attribution: C. Frank Starmer and Sparky Witte from http://oldcooperriverbridge.org
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