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This profile was last updated on 2/12/14  and contains information from public web pages.

Team Chief

Local Address: Washington D.C., District of Columbia, United States
US Army
 
Background

Employment History

  • Executive Services Officer
    US Army
  • U.S.

Board Memberships and Affiliations

  • Deputy Assistant Secretary
    U.S. Department of State's Passport Services group and the only government official
66 Total References
Web References
Tech Watch :: TechKnowledgeIt ::
www.techknowledgeit.com [cached]
The chip, a 64 kilobit contactless device similar to those found in many employee identification cards, would allow data to be read from a passport just by holding the document within 10 centimeters of a reader, said Frank Moss, Deputy Assistant Secretary for the U.S. Department of State's Passport Services group and the only government official on the panel.
[ Read More ]
- January 29 - Frank Moss, ...
dagon.sv.wikimiki.org, 7 Mar 2009 [cached]
- January 29 - Frank Moss, U.S. Senator from Utah (b. 1911)
Francis ...
www.wausaudailyherald.com, 21 Dec 2009 [cached]
Francis Moss
Francis Moss, 74, 2081 Nancy Drive, Tomahawk, died Saturday, Dec. 19, 2009, at his residence.
Fran served in the U.S. Army in 1954, serving 28 years including the years he served in the National Guard. He had owned and operated Tomahawk Paint for six years and was a former school bus driver.
Frank ...
www.utahhistorytogo.org, 13 April 2001 [cached]
Frank Moss
...
Utah History To Go - Frank E. "Ted" Moss
...
FRANK E. "TED" MOSS
...
A moderate Democrat, though personally more liberal than his constituents, Frank E. "Ted" Moss was a three-term U.S.Senator who served from 1959 to 1977.He was born in Holladay, a suburb of Salt Lake City, on 23 September 1911, the youngest of seven children of James E. Moss, a well-known secondary-school educator, and Maude Nixon Moss.He graduated from Salt Lake City's Granite High School in 1929, from the University of Utah in 1933, and from George Washington University Law School in 1937.On 20 June 1934 he married Phyllis Hart, and the couple had four children.
After receiving his law degree Moss worked for two years on the legal staff of the Securities and Exchange Commission.He returned to Utah in 1939 and became a law clerk to Utah Supreme Court Justice James H. Wolfe.In 1940 he was elected a judge in Salt Lake City's Municipal Court.During World War II he was on the Judge Advocate General's staff of the U.S. Army Air Corps in England.Following the war he returned to Salt Lake and was reelected a city judge.He was elected Salt Lake County Attorney in 1950 and was reelected in 1954.
In 1956 Moss ran unsuccessfully for the Democratic nomination for governor.Two years later he ran for the U.S. Senate against two-term incumbent Arthur V. Watkins, who was a close ally of both the Eisenhower administration and the Mormon Church, and also against J. Bracken Lee, a non-Mormon and former two-term Utah governor (1949-57), who was running as an independent after losing to Watkins in the Republican primary.The Republican vote was split in the general election and Moss was elected with less than 40 percent of the vote.
Moss was elected to a second term in 1964, soundly defeating with 57 percent of the vote Brigham Young University President Ernest L. Wilkinson, a conservative Republican, in a bitter campaign.He was elected to a third term in 1970 when he won 56 percent of the vote against four-term congressman Lawrence Burton.The campaign was close until the final weeks, when a series of attempts by Burton misfired which had tried to paint Moss as an unpatriotic, closet liberal who supported reduced penalties for drug use and riots on college campuses.
In the early years of his Senate career, Moss followed the tradition of sitting in the back row and keeping quiet.As he gained seniority, however, he became increasingly visible and eventually gained a measure of national prominence, in particular with regard to environmental, consumer, and health care issues.He became an expert on water issues and wrote a book on the subject, The Water Crisis (1967); worked to secure additional national parks for Utah; and initiated important investigations into the care of the elderly in nursing and retirement homes, and into physicians' abuses of the federal Medicaid program.
His work as chair of the Consumer Subcommittee of the Senate Commerce Committee probably brought him the most national attention.He sponsored a measure that required improved labeling on cigarette packages about the health hazards of smoking and banned cigarette advertising on radio and television; he also sponsored the Consumer Product Warranty and Guarantee Act, the Toy Safety Act, the Product Safety Act, and the Poison Prevention Packaging Act.Following his loss in 1976 to Orrin Hatch, a conservative lawyer who had the support of Ronald Reagan, he returned to private life and the practice of law in Washington, D.C., and Salt Lake City.
See: Andrew W. Buffmire, "Frank E. Moss," in Deanna Nash, ed., Citizens Look at Congress (1972).John S. McCormick.
Privacy groups slam US passport technology | The Register
www.theregister.co.uk, 20 April 2005 [cached]
The chip, a 64 kilobit contactless device similar to those found in many employee identification cards, would allow data to be read from a passport just by holding the document within 10 centimeters of a reader, said Frank Moss, Deputy Assistant Secretary for the U.S. Department of State's Passport Services group and the only government official on the panel.
Moss called critics' arguments - warning that terrorists would gain the ability to remotely identify Americans using the chipped passports - absurd.
"We would not use our own people as test populations if we thought there was any risk associated with this passport," he said."The idea that you can walk down a hotel hallway and identify the Americans is, quite frankly, poppycock."
Moss added that to reduce the possiblity of any such scenario, the U.S. planned to put a nonmetallic material in the cover of passports that would block wireless signals.
...
Moss maintained that the specification was not created by the United States, but as part of a multi-nation process at the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO).
"This is not just the United State's initiative," he said."This technology is viewed widely to be taking passports to a new generation of security in terms of verifying that the person carrying the passport is the person to whom the passport was issued."
The process to create a standard for the design of a passport with a chip requiring electrical and physical contact would have been onerous, Moss maintained.
...
"We are doing it right, we just disagree," Moss said.
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