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Wrong Frank Aarestrup?

Frank Møller Aarestrup

Head

World Health Organization

HQ Phone:  (518) 436-9686

Email: a***@***.int

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

World Health Organization

49 Sheridan Avenue

Albany, New York,12210

United States

Company Description

WHO is the directing and coordinating authority for health within the United Nations system. It is responsible for providing leadership on global health matters, shaping the health research agenda, setting norms and standards, articulating evidence-based polic... more

Find other employees at this company (12,970)

Background Information

Employment History

Professor

National Food Institute at the Technical University of Denmark


Web References(47 Total References)


Journal Nature: Farmers Should Rein in Antibiotic Use Worldwide | Food Safety News

www.foodsafetynews.com [cached]

In a separate Nature article, also published this week (Subscription Required), Frank Aarestrup, the head of the World Health Organization's Collaborating Center for Antimicrobial Resistance Among Foodborne Pathogens also called for changes in the way livestock farms use antibiotics.
"This is an unsustainable situation," wrote Aarestrup. "Since many farmers began giving antibiotics to livestock in the late 1940s, people have been infected with strains of bacteria that are resistant to those antibiotics." Danish farmers and public health officials decided to be proactive and have succeeded and reducing overall drug usage. "Since the mid-1990s in Denmark, the use of antimicrobial agents per kilogram of livestock produced has dropped by 60%. And pork production has actually increased by 50% since 1994, before any interventions began," noted Aarestrup. He credits Denmark's national antimicrobial resistance monitoring system and targeted regulations on usage, as well as the country's 1995 prohibition on veterinarians profiting on selling antibiotics to farmers. "The conflict of interest is clear," he wrote.


Antibiotic Resistance in Meat - Smart Health Talk

www.smarthealthtalk.com [cached]

And empirical evidence suggests that the pigs are at least as healthy as ever, according to Frank M. Aarestrup, the head of the European Union Reference Laboratory for Antimicrobial Resistance and a member of the World Health Organization Collaborating Center for Antimicrobial Resistance in Foodborne Pathogens at the National Food Institute.
"An early 'unscientific' estimate from the Danish agricultural industry identified increased mortality and reduced growth in piglets, while poultry and slaughter pigs were completely unaffected," Aarestrup, who is based at the Technical University of Denmark, wrote in an email. Thus without a baseline it is difficult to give hard facts," Aarestrup conceded.


www.foodsafetynews.com

In a separate Nature article, also published this week (Subscription Required), Frank Aarestrup, the head of the World Health Organization's Collaborating Center for Antimicrobial Resistance Among Foodborne Pathogens also called for changes in the way livestock farms use antibiotics.
"This is an unsustainable situation," wrote Aarestrup. "Since many farmers began giving antibiotics to livestock in the late 1940s, people have been infected with strains of bacteria that are resistant to those antibiotics." Danish farmers and public health officials decided to be proactive and have succeeded and reducing overall drug usage. "Since the mid-1990s in Denmark, the use of antimicrobial agents per kilogram of livestock produced has dropped by 60%. And pork production has actually increased by 50% since 1994, before any interventions began," noted Aarestrup. He credits Denmark's national antimicrobial resistance monitoring system and targeted regulations on usage, as well as the country's 1995 prohibition on veterinarians profiting on selling antibiotics to farmers. "The conflict of interest is clear," he wrote.


TGen News - TGen and DTU researchers track source of Haitian cholera outbreak

www.tgen.org [cached]

Dr. Keim praised TGen's collaborators at the National Public Health Laboratory in Nepal, and at the National Food Institute in Denmark, where the study's senior author, Dr. Frank M. Aarestrup, is head of the Antimicrobial Resistance and Molecular Epidemiology Unit.
"This study highlights how rapidly infectious diseases might be transmitted globally through international travel, and how public health officials need to use advanced molecular tools, along with standard epidemiological analyses, to quickly and accurately determine sources of outbreaks," said Dr. Aarestrup, who also is head of both the World Health Organization's Collaborating Centre for Antimicrobial Resistance among Foodborne Pathogens and of the European Union (EU) Reference Laboratory for Antimicrobial Resistance.


www.tgen.org

Dr. Frank M. Aarestrup, Head of the Microbial Genomics and Antimicrobial Resistance unit at the Technical University of Denmark, said the study provided valuable information about the origins and future risks of this MRSA strain.
"Given its rapid emergence and trajectory of increasing importance in humans, the evolutionary history of MRSA CC398 has relevance for the epidemiology of MRSA and global health," said Dr. Aarestrup, who also is head of both the World Health Organization's Collaborating Centre for Antimicrobial Resistance among Foodborne Pathogens and of the European Union (EU) Reference Laboratory for Antimicrobial Resistance.


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