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2015-06-05T00:00:00.000Z

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Wrong Forrest Fenn?

Mr. Forrest Fenn

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Background Information

Employment History

Collected Works Bookstore

Owner

Fenn Gallery LLC

Affiliations

Founder
Old Santa Fe Trading Co

Owner
Fenn Gallery LLC

Education

Texas Community College

Web References (148 Total References)


Perspective: Nicolai Fechin [1881-1955]

www.westernartandarchitecture.com [cached]

Nicolai Fechin, Lillies and Shell, Oil, 24 x 20 inches, Forrest and Peggy Fenn collection.

...
In 1976, Forrest Fenn of the Fenn Gallery in Santa Fe made arrangements through the Soviet Minister of Culture for a remarkable cultural exchange: 36 of Fechin's Russian paintings came to the United States for an impressive retrospective.
...
From the author: Many thanks to Forrest Fenn for allowing access to his Fechin archive including letters, diary, photographs, articles and recorded interviews.


Forrest Fenn's Collection and Western Art Gallery - Old Santa Fe Trading Co.

www.oldsantafetradingco.com [cached]

Forrest Fenn displaying his art collection

The urge to collect started for Forrest Fenn at age nine when he found his first arrowhead. It was just lying there in a plowed field on Little Elm Creek in Central Texas, waiting for him to come along. He still claims it is the most treasured object in his collection. "It was a thrill that started me on a long journey of adventure and discovery," he said.
In 1972, he and his wife Peggy built a gallery in Santa Fe, where the primary product was paintings by the old masters of the Western scene such as Frederic Remington, Charlie Russell, Thomas Moran and the great Taos painters. But his love was for the history of the old West, so he sought those objects that would conjure back images of earlier, more romantic times.
Traders and collectors alike came to his gallery where he was a ready listener.


Forrest Fenn's Collection and Western Art Gallery - Old Santa Fe Trading Co.

www.oldsantafetradingco.com [cached]

Forrest Fenn displaying his art collection

The urge to collect started for Forrest Fenn at age nine when he found his first arrowhead. It was just lying there in a plowed field on Little Elm Creek in Central Texas, waiting for him to come along. He still claims it is the most treasured object in his collection. "It was a thrill that started me on a long journey of adventure and discovery," he said.
In 1972, he and his wife Peggy built a gallery in Santa Fe, where the primary product was paintings by the old masters of the Western scene such as Frederic Remington, Charlie Russell, Thomas Moran and the great Taos painters. But his love was for the history of the old West, so he sought those objects that would conjure back images of earlier, more romantic times.
Traders and collectors alike came to his gallery where he was a ready listener.


The Secrets of San Lazaro Pueblo : Southwest BookViews

evopubswbv.evolutionwebdev.com [cached]

by Forrest Fenn; Reviewed by E. Donald Kaye

...
A fighter pilot in his youth, Fenn took opportunities to work as an amateur on archaeological digs in the US and overseas. Later, he was the owner of the Fenn Gallery in Santa Fe, specializing in Indian art. He has exquisite taste in and enormous knowledge of such. This book doesn't directly say so, but he also happens to own San Lazaro Pueblo, which I believe he bought for taxes years ago when, presumably, everyone else was asleep. That is why he has been able to work for years by himself or with a few friends, excavating parts of the pueblo without being thrown in jail.
Fenn has become an avocational archaeologist, but one with enough sense to bring in professionals when appropriate. Because of his digging at San Lazaro, he is scorned by the "preservation world," much of which apparently doesn't believe in the concept of private property, and by many archaeologists who apparently think that God meant only degreed, professional archaeologists to have the right to dig up the past, and that only they can be careful and scientific. Fortunately, there are professionals who are smart enough to face facts and to cooperate with Fenn for the sake of knowledge and for that matter, preservation.
This book is for the most part written by Fenn himself.
...
Without being preachy, Fenn intersperses a lot of education between the descriptions and the illustrations. If the reader actually reads the text and the photo captions, a lot of archaeology and some history will almost accidentally be learned. The myriad illustrations that accompany the text, showing hundreds and hundreds of found objects, are an intregal part of the learning.
Fenn starts by writing: "If you love the lore and the lure of ancient places and things, this volume is dedicated to you. May the stories herein keep you forever asking and searching. This book certainly can provide the basis for "asking," as well as offer many answers, and may indeed keep you searching, though it is highly unlikely that you will find the same opportunity for physical searching that the author has found.
One thing this reviewer likes about Fenn is his willingness to pooh-pooh rules accepted by so many modern archaeologists. I well recall going to Chaco Canyon on a trip with a noted, modern archaeologist who along the way pointed out mounds and told us that those mounds covered prehistoric pueblos or smaller settlements and "we don't need to dig them because we already know what is there. Speaking of a wooden figure found at San Lazaro (and he could have included the two plaster masks found, the only examples ever found in the Southwest), Fenn puts his objections like this: "Both conservators told us that we were at least a hundred years too late recovering this beautiful wooden woman, which emphasizes once again the urgency to excavate archaeological sites.


Editorials by Forrest Fenn - The secrets of San Lazaro Pueblo

www.oldsantafetradingco.com [cached]

The Secrets of San Lazaro Pueblo, by Forrest Fenn

...
A fighter pilot in his youth, Fenn took opportunities to work as an amateur on archaeological digs in the US and overseas. Later, he was the owner of the Fenn Gallery in Santa Fe, specializing in Indian art. He has exquisite taste in and enormous knowledge of such. This book doesn't directly say so, but he also happens to own San Lazaro Pueblo, which I believe he bought for taxes years ago when, presumably, everyone else was asleep. That is why he has been able to work for years by himself or with a few friends, excavating parts of the pueblo without being thrown in jail.
Fenn has become an avocational archaeologist, but one with enough sense to bring in professionals when appropriate. Because of his digging at San Lazaro, he is scorned by the "preservation world," much of which apparently doesn't believe in the concept of private property, and by many archaeologists who apparently think that God meant only degreed, professional archaeologists to have the right to dig up the past, and that only they can be careful and scientific. Fortunately, there are professionals who are smart enough to face facts and to cooperate with Fenn for the sake of knowledge and for that matter, preservation.
This book is for the most part written by Fenn himself.
...
Without being preachy, Fenn intersperses a lot of education between the descriptions and the illustrations. If the reader actually reads the text and the photo captions, a lot of archaeology and some history will almost accidentally be learned. The myriad illustrations that accompany the text, showing hundreds and hundreds of found objects, are an integral part of the learning.
Fenn starts by writing: "If you love the lore and the lure of ancient places and things, this volume is dedicated to you. May the stories herein keep you forever asking and searching. This book certainly can provide the basis for "asking," as well as offer many answers, and may indeed keep you searching, though it is highly unlikely that you will find the same opportunity for physical searching that the author has found.
One thing this reviewer likes about Fenn is his willingness to pooh-pooh rules accepted by so many modern archaeologists. I well recall going to Chaco Canyon on a trip with a noted, modern archaeologist who along the way pointed out mounds and told us that those mounds covered prehistoric pueblos or smaller settlements and "we don't need to dig them because we already know what is there. Speaking of a wooden figure found at San Lazaro (and he could have included the two plaster masks found, the only examples ever found in the Southwest), Fenn puts his objections like this: "Both conservators told us that we were at least a hundred years too late recovering this beautiful wooden woman, which emphasizes once again the urgency to excavate archaeological sites.

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