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This profile was last updated on 6/23/04  and contains information from public web pages.

Floyd Schneider

Wrong Floyd Schneider?

Investment Adviser

Phone: (202) ***-****  HQ Phone
Securities and Exchange Commission
100 F St. NE
Washington DC , District of Columbia 20549
United States

Company Description: This year's SEC Conference forum will focus on the impact of recent capital market events on small business capital formation in the United States, with a...   more
Background

Employment History

  • Mortgage Broker
7 Total References
Web References
http://www.jewishworldreview.com | (KRT) ...
www.jewishworldreview.com, 23 June 2004 [cached]
http://www.jewishworldreview.com | (KRT) Floyd Schneider, a mortgage broker with a booming voice and boundless energy, has given three sermonettes at the small church he attends.
Two were about stock fraud.The third might have been, were it not for the pleadings of his wife, who urged him to focus on something more biblical.
Schneider, 47, leads a second life in cyberspace as the Truthseeker, nemesis of wayward capitalists.
It is both an avocation and an obsession.Since 1998, he has posted more than 30,000 messages on Internet stock boards, raising questions about companies and digging into the backgrounds of their officers, directors and consultants.
He has been sued by three of his targets and racked up nearly $60,000 in legal bills.
Still he persists, driven by the belief that government regulators are overmatched in their battle against white-collar criminals.
"It comes down to a moral obligation to society," Schneider said.
The information that he uncovered or pieced together has helped the Securities and Exchange Commission and National Association of Securities Dealers bring cases against rogue companies, financiers and promoters.
Donate to JWRSchneider is thinking about cutting back on his sleuthing, to spend more time with his three children, who range in age from 4 to 6.But he remains captivated by a case that the SEC has declined to pursue.
"The biggest thing that's kept me going is ZiaSun," Schneider said.
...
"They wanted more than $1 million," Schneider said.
...
For instance, copies of letters that investors sent to their PT Dolok brokers after Schneider issued a negative report on ZiaSun bear markings that indicate that they quickly were forwarded by fax to Cragun.
...
Schneider has been perfecting his research methods since 1998, when he first accessed the Internet through an America Online dial-up account at his office.
He eventually found his way to the stock message boards and discovered a thread where people discussed how to use search engines to research stocks.He later taught himself how to sift through SEC filings online.
He also pulled together information on suspect companies and forwarded the dossiers to reporters.
Schneider's research has led to stories by the Wall Street Journal, Dow Jones News Service and other news organizations.
...
For a time, Schneider had his own Web site, where followers could pay $39.95 a year to read his reports.He even put out "sell" recommendations, in the same style as the "buy" reports issued by the promoters.His logo was a flying pig.
But when Schneider learned that charging for information could require him to register with the SEC as an investment adviser, he refunded the subscription money.
"I didn't need it," he said."I do well enough in my mortgage business."Indeed, he generated $31.8 million in home loans last year, making him one of the top producers in his company.
The only way individual investors can overcome the limitations of the SEC and counter stock fraud is by taking charge of their own destinies and doing their own digging, he said.
"There's so much money involved, and (stock fraud is) so easy to do, and no one's preventing it," he said. "It's legalized thievery."
Calyx News
www.calyxnews.com [cached]
FREDON TOWNSHIP, N.J. - Floyd Schneider, a mortgage broker with a booming voice and boundless energy, has given three sermonettes at the small church he attends.
Two were about stock fraud.The third might have been, were it not for the pleadings of his wife, who urged him to focus on something more biblical.
Schneider, 47, leads a second life in cyberspace as the Truthseeker, nemesis of wayward capitalists.
It is both an avocation and an obsession.Since 1998, he has posted more than 30,000 messages on Internet stock boards, raising questions about companies and digging into the backgrounds of their officers, directors and consultants.
He has been sued by three of his targets and racked up nearly $60,000 in legal bills.
Still he persists, driven by the belief that government regulators are overmatched in their battle against white-collar criminals.
"It comes down to a moral obligation to society," Schneider said.
The information that he uncovered or pieced together has helped the Securities and Exchange Commission and National Association of Securities Dealers bring cases against rogue companies, financiers and promoters.
Schneider is thinking about cutting back on his sleuthing, to spend more time with his three children, who range in age from 4 to 6.But he remains captivated by a case that the SEC has declined to pursue.
"The biggest thing that's kept me going is ZiaSun," Schneider said.
...
"They wanted more than $1 million," Schneider said.
...
For instance, copies of letters that investors sent to their PT Dolok brokers after Schneider issued a negative report on ZiaSun bear markings that indicate that they quickly were forwarded by fax to Cragun.
...
Schneider has been perfecting his research methods since 1998, when he first accessed the Internet through an America Online dial-up account at his office.
He eventually found his way to the stock message boards and discovered a thread where people discussed how to use search engines to research stocks.He later taught himself how to sift through SEC filings online.
He also pulled together information on suspect companies and forwarded the dossiers to reporters.
Schneider's research has led to stories by the Wall Street Journal, Dow Jones News Service and other news organizations.
...
For a time, Schneider had his own Web site, where followers could pay $39.95 a year to read his reports.He even put out "sell" recommendations, in the same style as the "buy" reports issued by the promoters.His logo was a flying pig.
But when Schneider learned that charging for information could require him to register with the SEC as an investment adviser, he refunded the subscription money.
"I didn't need it," he said."I do well enough in my mortgage business."Indeed, he generated $31.8 million in home loans last year, making him one of the top producers in his company.
The only way individual investors can overcome the limitations of the SEC and counter stock fraud is by taking charge of their own destinies and doing their own digging, he said.
"There's so much money involved, and (stock fraud is) so easy to do, and no one's preventing it," he said.
KRT Wire | 06/22/2004 | Muckraker digs up dirt on companies, posts it on Net
www.ledger-enquirer.com, 22 June 2004 [cached]
FREDON TOWNSHIP, N.J. - (KRT) - Floyd Schneider, a mortgage broker with a booming voice and boundless energy, has given three sermonettes at the small church he attends.
Two were about stock fraud.The third might have been, were it not for the pleadings of his wife, who urged him to focus on something more biblical.
Schneider, 47, leads a second life in cyberspace as the Truthseeker, nemesis of wayward capitalists.
It is both an avocation and an obsession.Since 1998, he has posted more than 30,000 messages on Internet stock boards, raising questions about companies and digging into the backgrounds of their officers, directors and consultants.
He has been sued by three of his targets and racked up nearly $60,000 in legal bills.
Still he persists, driven by the belief that government regulators are overmatched in their battle against white-collar criminals.
"It comes down to a moral obligation to society," Schneider said.
The information that he uncovered or pieced together has helped the Securities and Exchange Commission and National Association of Securities Dealers bring cases against rogue companies, financiers and promoters.
Schneider is thinking about cutting back on his sleuthing, to spend more time with his three children, who range in age from 4 to 6.But he remains captivated by a case that the SEC has declined to pursue.
"The biggest thing that's kept me going is ZiaSun," Schneider said.
...
"They wanted more than $1 million," Schneider said.
...
For instance, copies of letters that investors sent to their PT Dolok brokers after Schneider issued a negative report on ZiaSun bear markings that indicate that they quickly were forwarded by fax to Cragun.
...
Schneider has been perfecting his research methods since 1998, when he first accessed the Internet through an America Online dial-up account at his office.
He eventually found his way to the stock message boards and discovered a thread where people discussed how to use search engines to research stocks.He later taught himself how to sift through SEC filings online.
He also pulled together information on suspect companies and forwarded the dossiers to reporters.
Schneider's research has led to stories by the Wall Street Journal, Dow Jones News Service and other news organizations.
...
For a time, Schneider had his own Web site, where followers could pay $39.95 a year to read his reports.He even put out "sell" recommendations, in the same style as the "buy" reports issued by the promoters.His logo was a flying pig.
But when Schneider learned that charging for information could require him to register with the SEC as an investment adviser, he refunded the subscription money.
"I didn't need it," he said."I do well enough in my mortgage business."Indeed, he generated $31.8 million in home loans last year, making him one of the top producers in his company.
The only way individual investors can overcome the limitations of the SEC and counter stock fraud is by taking charge of their own destinies and doing their own digging, he said.
"There's so much money involved, and (stock fraud is) so easy to do, and no one's preventing it," he said.
STLtoday - News - Nation
www.stltoday.com, 13 June 2004 [cached]
FREDON TOWNSHIP, N.J. - Floyd Schneider, a mortgage broker with a booming voice and boundless energy, has given three sermonettes at the small church he attends.
Two were about stock fraud.The third might have been, were it not for the pleadings of his wife, who urged him to focus on something more biblical.
Schneider, 47, leads a second life in cyberspace as the Truthseeker, nemesis of wayward capitalists.
It is both an avocation and an obsession.Since 1998, he has posted more than 30,000 messages on Internet stock boards, raising questions about companies and digging into the backgrounds of their officers, directors and consultants.
He has been sued by three of his targets and racked up nearly $60,000 in legal bills.
Still he persists, driven by the belief that government regulators are overmatched in their battle against white-collar criminals.
"It comes down to a moral obligation to society," Schneider said.
The information that he uncovered or pieced together has helped the Securities and Exchange Commission and National Association of Securities Dealers bring cases against rogue companies, financiers and promoters.
Schneider is thinking about cutting back on his sleuthing, to spend more time with his three children, who range in age from 4 to 6 . But he remains captivated by a case that the SEC has declined to pursue.
"The biggest thing that's kept me going is ZiaSun," Schneider said.
...
"They wanted more than $1 million," Schneider said.
...
For instance, copies of letters that investors sent to their PT Dolok brokers after Schneider issued a negative report on ZiaSun bear markings that indicate that they quickly were forwarded by fax to Cragun.
...
Schneider has been perfecting his research methods since 1998, when he first accessed the Internet through an America Online dial-up account at his office.
He eventually found his way to the stock message boards and discovered a thread where people discussed how to use search engines to research stocks.He later taught himself how to sift through SEC filings online.
He also pulled together information on suspect companies and forwarded the dossiers to reporters.
Schneider's research has led to stories by the Wall Street Journal, Dow Jones News Service and other news organizations.
...
For a time, Schneider had his own Web site, where followers could pay $39.95 a year to read his reports.He even put out "sell" recommendations, in the same style as the "buy" reports issued by the promoters.His logo was a flying pig.
But when Schneider learned that charging for information could require him to register with the SEC as an investment adviser, he refunded the subscription money.
"I didn't need it," he said."I do well enough in my mortgage business."Indeed, he generated $31.8 million in home loans last year, making him one of the top producers in his company.
The only way individual investors can overcome the limitations of the SEC and counter stock fraud is by taking charge of their own destinies and doing their own digging, he said.
"There's so much money involved, and (stock fraud is) so easy to do, and no one's preventing it," he said.
BW Online | February 10, 2003 | Sleuthing Stocks on the I-Way
www.businessweek.com, 5 Feb 2003 [cached]
"You can give me a name, and I can come back with all kinds of information in five minutes," says Floyd Schneider, a New Jersey mortgage broker and amateur Internet sleuth."There are things on the Internet that people don't even realize are on there."
For Serious GumshoesVANISHED PAGESThe place to begin an Internet investigation is with one or more of the popular search engines.The most comprehensive is Google, which has a valuable "cache" feature that allows you to get access to a Web page even if it has vanished from the Web.
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