About | Free Trial

Last Update

2012-03-25T00:00:00.000Z

This profile was last updated on // .

Is this you? Claim your profile.

Background Information

Education



Masuk High School



Naugatuck Community College

Web References (2 Total References)


Paulina Krynska, 19, poses with her ...

www.stamfordadvocate.com, 14 Oct 2011 [cached]

Paulina Krynska, 19, poses with her family while at her home in Monroe, Conn. on Wednesday October 12, 2011. From left to right is mom Ewa Krynska, Paulina, dad Darius Krynski, and sister Victoria Krynski, 5. Paulina came to the US with her family from Poland when she was 11 years old. She received a letter from the INS in which she was the subject of removal for violation of her immigration status. Photo: Christian Abraham / Connecticut Post

...
From left to right is mom Ewa Krynska, Paulina, dad Darius Krynski, and sister Victoria Krynski, 5.
...
Krynska's father, Dariusz, and mother, Ewa, first came to the U.S. on tourist visas on the advice of relatives in New York and moved into an apartment in Queens. Krynska's father then obtained a work visa and her mother a student visa. The family moved to Monroe in 2005.
Krynska came to the U.S. from Poland on a tourist visa when she was 11, but never returned there. She has a social security number that she got when she was issued a work permit for her first high school job. She used that to get a driver's license and pay taxes on the wages she earned working at local coffee shops. She was able to extend her stay in the U.S. when she was granted dependent status, but she has been here illegally since the extension expired in 2006, according to documents the U.S. Department of Homeland Security sent her.
When DHS sent her a letter that said she was "removable" her family hired a lawyer who helped them navigate the immigration court system. In August, he told Krynska she had little choice but to sign the voluntary departure.
The car ride to Hartford on the day she went to sign the agreement was mostly silent, she said. Her lawyer asked her if she was sure of her decision. It was highly unlikely she would be allowed to return to the U.S. unless it was as a fiancé to an American citizen, she was told.
"Mostly, I was just like sad," Krynska said. "I wanted to cry."
She signed the document on Aug. 18 at 8:30 a.m. She agreed to leave the country no later than Dec. 16. But what she didn't know was on that very same day, President Barack Obama announced he was establishing a new process to handle deportation cases. His administration would continue to focus more efforts on deporting criminal immigrants in the country illegally. The president said in May the immigration officials would focus on violent offenders and not families or "folks who are looking to scrape together an income."
Krynska graduated from Masuk High School and attends Naugatuck Community College as a liberal arts and science major. She plans to transfer to Western Connecticut State University in Danbury and get a degree in business or marketing. Krynska feels she qualifies as an immigrant in good standing.
Her lawyer, Crescenzo DeLuca, sent in paperwork to have her case reopened, but in September, Krynska was notified her appeal was denied.
...
Krynska's father, Dariusz, and mother, Ewa, first came to the U.S....


Paulina Krynska, 19, poses with her ...

www.stamfordadvocate.com, 14 Oct 2011 [cached]

Paulina Krynska, 19, poses with her family while at her home in Monroe, Conn. on Wednesday October 12, 2011. From left to right is mom Ewa Krynska, Paulina, dad Darius Krynski, and sister Victoria Krynski, 5. Paulina came to the US with her family from Poland when she was 11 years old. She received a letter from the INS in which she was the subject of removal for violation of her immigration status. Photo: Christian Abraham / Connecticut Post

...
From left to right is mom Ewa Krynska, Paulina, dad Darius Krynski, and sister Victoria Krynski, 5.
...
Krynska's father, Dariusz, and mother, Ewa, first came to the U.S. on tourist visas on the advice of relatives in New York and moved into an apartment in Queens. Krynska's father then obtained a work visa and her mother a student visa. The family moved to Monroe in 2005.
Krynska came to the U.S. from Poland on a tourist visa when she was 11, but never returned there. She has a Social Security number that she got when she was issued a work permit for her first high school job. She used that to get a driver's license and pay taxes on the wages she earned working at local coffee shops. She was able to extend her stay in the U.S. when she was granted dependent status, but she has been here illegally since the extension expired in 2006, according to documents the U.S. Department of Homeland Security sent her.
When DHS sent her a letter that said she was "removable," her family hired a lawyer who helped them navigate the immigration court system. In August, he told Krynska she had little choice but to sign the voluntary departure.
The car ride to Hartford on the day she went to sign the agreement was mostly silent, she said. Her lawyer asked her if she was sure of her decision. It was highly unlikely she would be allowed to return to the U.S. unless it was as a fiance to an American citizen, she was told.
"Mostly, I was just like sad," Krynska said. "I wanted to cry."
She signed the document on Aug. 18 at 8:30 a.m. She agreed to leave the country no later than Dec. 16. But what she didn't know was on that very same day, President Barack Obama announced he was establishing a new process to handle deportation cases. His administration would focus more effort on deporting criminal immigrants in the country illegally. The president said in May that immigration officials would focus on violent offenders and not families or "folks who are looking to scrape together an income."
Krynska graduated from Masuk High School and attends Naugatuck Community College as a liberal arts and science major. She plans to transfer to Western Connecticut State University in Danbury and get a degree in business or marketing. Krynska feels she qualifies as an immigrant in good standing.
Her lawyer, Crescenzo DeLuca, sent in paperwork to have her case reopened, but in September, Krynska was notified her appeal was denied.
...
Krynska's father, Dariusz, and mother, Ewa, first came to the U.S....

Similar Profiles

Other People with this Name (15)

Other people with the name Krynska

Dominika Krynska
NCR Corporation

Edyta Krynska
Rag & Bone

Liliana Krynska
Seattle Central Community College

Monika Krynska
Charles Rutenberg Realty

Magdalena Krynska
PRA International Inc

Browse ZoomInfo's Business Contact Directory by City

Browse ZoomInfo's
Business People Directory

Browse ZoomInfo's
Advanced Company Directory