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This profile was last updated on 8/12/06  and contains information from public web pages.

Eunice Moe Brock

Wrong Eunice Moe Brock?
 
Background

Employment History

  • Head
    Liumiao Village
  • Philanthropy Ambassador
    China
  • Philanthropy Ambassador
6 Total References
Web References
Creaders.NET
www.creadersnet.com, 12 Aug 2006 [cached]
(An old woman wishes U.S. citizen Eunice Brock, right, "Happy Birthday" at a party in Liumiao Village of Yanggu County in East China's Shangdong Province on Friday, August 11, 2006.Brock was born to missionary parents on August 11, 1917 in China.She went back to the U.S. in 1930.She returned to live in the small village in Shandong in 1999.Photo: Xinhua)
U.S. citizen Eunice Brock, who has been living in Liumiao Village in East China's Shandong Province for almost seven years, celebrated her 89th birthday together with villagers in a simple ceremony on Friday.
Over the years, Brock has overcome the language barrier and gotten accustomed to local life.She said her biggest wish was to spend the rest of her life in China, the Xinhua News Agency reported.
Brock was born on August 11, 1917 in Beidaihe, a noted summer resort in North China's Hebei Province.Both her parents were Christian missionaries.They later moved to a small village of Liaocheng in Shandong Province.
"Coming back to China, my birthplace, had long been my dream," Brock told Chinese media last year.
In 1930, when she was 13, she went back to the U.S. with her family.She became a nurse after graduating from college.
In 1992, Brock and her husband, both retired, had a two month holiday traveling around China.Her husband died on his 81st birthday on August 24, 1998.
"The dream - of going back to China to work - that I had laid aside now possessed me again," China Daily quoted Brock as saying last year.
645)this.width=645" border=0>
(U.S. citizen Eunice Brock, center, celebrates her 89th birthday at a party in Liumiao Village of Yanggu County in East China's Shangdong Province on Friday, August 11, 2006.Brock was born to missionary parents on August 11, 1917 in China.She went back to the U.S. in 1930.She returned to live in the small village in Shandong in 1999.Photo: Xinhua)
She wrote to the China Youth Development Foundation (CYDF) declaring she would like to live and work in the poor village like that of her childhood.She told the CYDF she wanted to build a school.
In September 1999, she arrived in Beijing and met a CYDF official surnamed Chen (she forgets his full name), with whom she had been corresponding.Chen returned from Liaocheng Prefecture and told Brock the head of Liumiao Village would be willing to accept her.They met the village head surnamed Liu, who on her arrival showed Brock around the village.
"He said a new school was not needed and asked if I would be willing to spend the money on computers for the primary school.Because of my age and because I was a foreigner, I knew that going to a very poor village was highly unlikely.The dialect in the village was the same as what I used as a child so I decided to live in Liumiao," she told China Daily last year.
She settled down in a house with a big courtyard.The villagers tried to give her a comfortable living condition.Her home today is well-equipped with all necessities including a computer and Internet access.
She donated US,30,000 to the primary school to buy computers and set up a special classroom for computer education.She also bought books for the school library, musical instruments and sports equipment.She also bought books, papers and magazines to encourage the villagers to read about the world outside.
Life is busy but quite relaxed in the village.Brock enjoys gardening.She tore out most of the bricks and planted a multifarious flowerbed.She has made a series of gold-fish ponds with waterfalls.She gives seeds of flowers villagers who have shown a keen interest in gardening.Many come to visit her garden when it comes into full bloom.
Living out the autumn of her life back in the place of her birth is both fun and endearing, Brock told China Daily last year.
Creaders.NET
www.creadersnet.com, 3 Jan 2013 [cached]
In the past few years Brock has built a computer room for the primary school with her own money, and donated desk, chairs and books. She also paid the bills for people to have cataract surgery and has been trying to improve the medical care facilities in a number of villages. So far, she has donated more than 300,000 yuan.
Her work has been recognized not only by the people of Shandong, but also the nation. Brock was named China's Philanthropy Ambassador in 2003, and at the beginning of this year was awarded the title as one of the "10 People Who Touched Shandong 2006" for her affection and contributions towards the Chinese.
The woman regularly writes to her relatives in the US, talking about her life and the changes taking place in the small village and in the country.
"Several streets have been widened in Liumiao, and the main road is flanked with trees and shrubs," she wrote in the first letter.
In 2002 the local government invested 4 billion yuan to improve the power supply and began Internet service to villages, so Brock started to write e-mails.
"I am happy to have constant electricity, and I think the other villagers are happy, too," she said. "The Chinese government has made great efforts to improve basic utilities in rural areas to benefit poor people."
645)this.width=645" border=0>
Eunice Moe Brock rides a tricycle in her home village.
One of her neighbors, Aunt Zhang told Brock she received government-issued medical security compensation for the first time in a cooperative medication scheme for people living in rural areas. So Brock told her family: "The government will pay half of the villagers' medication if they join the project by paying a fee of only 10 yuan a year."
Brock said she was happy living in China, as she felt the various changes in the country were due to its increasing economic development.
She plants vegetables in the field herself, and puts up spring couplets on the door during the lunar new year.
In Liumiao, every child plays with toys in Brock's home, and at Christmas she always brings a batch of candies and takes them by a donkey cart to schools for students.
People's Daily Online -- Homeward bound
english.peopledaily.com.cn, 7 Jan 2005 [cached]
For octogenarian US citizen Eunice Brock, December 25, 2004 was the sixth time she had spent at the small village in China dressing up as the fabled old man and giving gifts.
But her seasonal act is more than a labour of love - it's an annual event in her new home.
"Coming back to China, my birthplace, had long been my dream," said Brock.
Brock was born on August 11, 1917 in Beidaihe, a noted summer resort in North China's Hebei Province.Both her parents were Christian missionaries and they spent many happy summers in the family small house, and when the winter drifted south from Siberia, they moved to the warmer climates to a small village of Liaocheng in Shandong Province.
During the 1920s and 30s China was like a pinball - forever rebounding from one upheaval and war to the next.People were disparately poor.Eunice still remembers a three-year long famine that affected part of Shandong and neighbouring provinces.
"I saw the poverty and suffering of the people," she recalls.
...
"The dream - of going back to China to work - that I had laid aside now possessed me again," says Brock.She wrote to the China Youth Development Foundation (CYDF) declaring she would like to live and work in the poor village like that of her childhood.She told the CYDF she wanted to build a school.
In September 1999, she arrived in Beijing and met an CYDF official surnamed Chen (she forgets his full name), with whom she had been corresponding.Chen returned from Liaocheng Prefecture and told Brock the head of Liumiao Village would be willing to accept her.They met the village head surnamed Liu, who on her arrival showed Brock around the village.
...
"Eunice is an optimistic person and very humorous," says Wang Yuqing, a 23-year-old woman who has been living with Brock for four years, working as her interpreter.
"Eunice loves guests.Our home is like a small club in the village, where villagers, old and young drop in at any time," she says.
Life is busy but quite relaxed in the village.Brock enjoys gardening.She tore out most of the bricks and planted a multifarious flowerbed.She has made a series of gold-fish ponds with waterfalls.She gives seeds of flowers villagers who have shown a keen interest in gardening.Many come to visit her garden when it comes into full bloom.
Many have adopted her love for flowers."I was so pleased to see two long streets were lined with blooming flowers this summer," she said.
Interesting experience
Living in the village is not always convenient but can often be an interesting experience.Brock has a Chinese style toilet which is not the most convenient of conveniences for an 87-year-old.However, she has made a "special chair" so her bathroom now combines characteristics of East and West.
Guests to her home are amazed when they come back from using the bathroom...To make every space in her home interesting, she painted a lake with rocks, red-crowned cranes and pink water lilies.She bought a large mirror and placed it under the mural right against the wall, making for an enchanting reflection.
She built a bathroom flower bed and planted ferns and colourful begonias.
"I was very proud of the back of my toilet!"she jokes.
Living out the autumn of her life back in the place of her birth is both fun and endearing, says Brock.
People's Daily Online -- US woman's kind deeds not forgotten
english.peopledaily.com.cn, 13 Jan 2007 [cached]
Eunice Moe Brock has donated her prize money to the needy of Shandong.
Born in North China's Hebei Province, Brock had always harbored deep feelings for the people and country of her birth.
Following her husband's death in 1998, she returned to China to settle in Shandong Province.
Since then she has been trying to improve the medical care facilities in a number of villages.To this end, Brock has donated more than 300,000 yuan.
Her work has been recognized not only by the people of Shandong, but also the nation.Brock was named China's Philanthropy Ambassador in 2003.
"It's far from enough, I must try and do more," was Brock's reaction to her latest award.
EGI International Limited
www.egi-international.com, 25 Nov 2007 [cached]
In the past few years Brock has built a computer room for the primary school with her own money, and donated desk, chairs and books. She also paid the bills for people to have cataract surgery and has been trying to improve the medical care facilities in a number of villages. So far, she has donated more than 300,000 yuan.
Her work has been recognized not only by the people of Shandong, but also the nation. Brock was named Chinas Philanthropy Ambassador in 2003, and at the beginning of this year was awarded the title as one of the "10 People Who Touched Shandong 2006" for her affection and contributions towards the Chinese.
The woman regularly writes to her relatives in the US, talking about her life and the changes taking place in the small village and in the country.
"Several streets have been widened in Liumiao, and the main road is flanked with trees and shrubs," she wrote in the first letter.
In 2002 the local government invested 4 billion yuan to improve the power supply and began Internet service to villages, so Brock started to write e-mails.
"I am happy to have constant electricity, and I think the other villagers are happy, too," she said. "The Chinese government has made great efforts to improve basic utilities in rural areas to benefit poor people."
Eunice Moe Brock rides a tricycle in her home village.
One of her neighbors, Aunt Zhang told Brock she received government-issued medical security compensation for the first time in a cooperative medication scheme for people living in rural areas. So Brock told her family: "The government will pay half of the villagers medication if they join the project by paying a fee of only 10 yuan a year."
Brock said she was happy living in China, as she felt the various changes in the country were due to its increasing economic development.
She plants vegetables in the field herself, and puts up spring couplets on the door during the lunar new year.
In Liumiao, every child plays with toys in Brocks home, and at Christmas she always brings a batch of candies and takes them by a donkey cart to schools for students.
"I hope to have a green card so that I can live in China forever. Im an American, but I have a Chinese heart," she said, promising to donate her organs to Chinese patients after her death.
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