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Wrong Ernest Westfield?

Ernest Ernie Westfield

Starting Pitcher

East

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

East

Background Information

Employment History

Pitcher

Birmingham Black Barons


Web References(35 Total References)


News7, Western Canada Baseball

attheplate.com [cached]

Baseball's 'Shadow men' still remain; Negro Leaguers McKnight, Westfield played for the love of the game
Ira McKnight, who played with the Kansas City Monarchs, and Ernie Westfield, who played with the Birmingham Black Barons, were part of a baseball card show at the Markland Mall. McKnight and Westfield were part of those traveling teams. Both men are part of living history -- history that is being slowly shoved aside and forgotten, according to Westfield. Ernest "Ernie" Westfield became a pitcher by a stroke of fate or perhaps by God's hand. The Tennessee native was playing semi-pro baseball in Knoxville in 1959 when opportunity knocked. "I usually played third base," Westfield said. "But the pitcher didn't show for some reason, and they asked me to pitch." Westfield made the most of the opportunity -- tossing a no-hitter. "After the game this scout came up to me. It was Buck O'Neil," Westfield said. O'Neil, beside being a great baseball player himself, was a scout for the Birmingham Black Barons, whom Westfield had faced that day. Westfield left with the team the next day and pitched for the Barons for the next six years. Westfield said he enjoyed his time in baseball and still has the desire to make people aware of the history of the Negro Leagues. "I don't want people to forget about what these players did," Westfield said. "A lot of young people today aren't aware of how baseball was then." Westfield says that not letting people forget about the past and the role that African American baseball players played in it is key to ending racial problems in this country. "It's funny. I was being interviewed by a reporter, and he asked me who my favorite player was when I was a kid," Westfield said. "I told him Carl Erskine, the pitcher for Dodgers. He said 'What about Joe Black or Don Newcombe?' I said no, my favorite player was Erskine. I guess he wanted me to say that my favorite player was black, not white." After his playing days, Westfield continued to coach baseball at the youth level. And he started working harder in his other passion -- poetry. "When I was younger, I could do two things well," Westfield said. "Play baseball and write poetry." Westfield said that he had a stuttering problem when he was younger, so he was more likely to put his thoughts on paper than speak them. "Surprisingly, all of my stuttering problems stopped when I started to play baseball," Westfield said. "I really loved Walter Payton," Westfield said. "I sent him a copy, but I don't know for sure if he got it," Westfield said. Westfield and McKnight played against each other in the last East-West All-Star Game at Cominsky Park in Chicago. Westfield was the starting pitcher for the East, while McKnight played third base for the West. Westfield pitched three innings for the East and left the game down, 3-2. Having been opponents on the field, Westfield and McKnight now can be found spreading the word about the Negro Leagues, making sure that an important part of history doesn't die or fade away.


News7, Western Canada Baseball

www.attheplate.com [cached]

Baseball's 'Shadow men' still remain; Negro Leaguers McKnight, Westfield played for the love of the game
Ira McKnight, who played with the Kansas City Monarchs, and Ernie Westfield, who played with the Birmingham Black Barons, were part of a baseball card show at the Markland Mall. McKnight and Westfield were part of those traveling teams. Both men are part of living history -- history that is being slowly shoved aside and forgotten, according to Westfield. Ernest "Ernie" Westfield became a pitcher by a stroke of fate or perhaps by God's hand. The Tennessee native was playing semi-pro baseball in Knoxville in 1959 when opportunity knocked. "I usually played third base," Westfield said. "But the pitcher didn't show for some reason, and they asked me to pitch." Westfield made the most of the opportunity -- tossing a no-hitter. "After the game this scout came up to me. It was Buck O'Neil," Westfield said. O'Neil, beside being a great baseball player himself, was a scout for the Birmingham Black Barons, whom Westfield had faced that day. Westfield left with the team the next day and pitched for the Barons for the next six years. Westfield said he enjoyed his time in baseball and still has the desire to make people aware of the history of the Negro Leagues. "I don't want people to forget about what these players did," Westfield said. "A lot of young people today aren't aware of how baseball was then." Westfield says that not letting people forget about the past and the role that African American baseball players played in it is key to ending racial problems in this country. "It's funny. I was being interviewed by a reporter, and he asked me who my favorite player was when I was a kid," Westfield said. "I told him Carl Erskine, the pitcher for Dodgers. He said 'What about Joe Black or Don Newcombe?' I said no, my favorite player was Erskine. I guess he wanted me to say that my favorite player was black, not white." After his playing days, Westfield continued to coach baseball at the youth level. And he started working harder in his other passion -- poetry. "When I was younger, I could do two things well," Westfield said. "Play baseball and write poetry." Westfield said that he had a stuttering problem when he was younger, so he was more likely to put his thoughts on paper than speak them. "Surprisingly, all of my stuttering problems stopped when I started to play baseball," Westfield said. "I really loved Walter Payton," Westfield said. "I sent him a copy, but I don't know for sure if he got it," Westfield said. Westfield and McKnight played against each other in the last East-West All-Star Game at Cominsky Park in Chicago. Westfield was the starting pitcher for the East, while McKnight played third base for the West. Westfield pitched three innings for the East and left the game down, 3-2. Having been opponents on the field, Westfield and McKnight now can be found spreading the word about the Negro Leagues, making sure that an important part of history doesn't die or fade away.


173.193.29.204-static.reverse.softlayer.com

Negro Leagues Panel: Panelists include former Negro Leagues pitchers Al Spearman and Ernie Westfield, and moderator Larry Lester.


sabr.org

SABR 45: Negro Leagues Panel with former players Al Spearman, Ernie Westfield
Ernie Westfield, pitcher for the Birmingham Black Barons, 1959-65; starter in final East-West All-Star Game at Comiskey Park


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www.negroleaguelegends.org [cached]

Among those who started in this game are: FRANK WILLIAMS - older brother of Baseball Hall-of-Famer and Chicago Cub Billy Williams; East Team Starting pitcher Ernest "Ernie" Westfield of the Birmingham Black Barons and Willie Gilmore of the famed Kansas City Monarchs who eventually got the win.


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