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Last Update

2014-10-02T00:00:00.000Z

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Background Information

Employment History

Detective
Fairmont Area Chamber of Commerce

Sergeant
Fairmont Police Department

Education

bachelor's degree
Criminal Justice

Web References (19 Total References)


Biographies

www.fairmont.org, $reference.date [cached]

Detective Eric Tonder Detective Tonder was hired as a Patrolman with the Fairmont Police Department in 1997. He was promoted to Sergeant in 2000 and in 2003 promoted to his current position of Detective. Detective Tonder has a bachelor's degree in Criminal Justice and has received training in several specialties some of which include; High Tech Criminal Forensic Computer Investigations, Seized Computer Evidence Recovery, Advanced Latent Prints, Crime Scene Evaluation and Processing, Death Scene Investigation, Internal Affairs Investigations, Advanced Interview and Interrogation, Advanced Statement Analysis and Child Abuse Forensic Interviewing. Detective Tonder supervises Fairmont's Predatory Offender Registration Compliance and has served as a Drug Recognition Expert (DRE).


The division is currently comprised of ...

www.fairmont.org, $reference.date [cached]

The division is currently comprised of Detective Eric Tonder.


Detective Eric Tonder of the ...

www.fairmontsentinel.com, $reference.date [cached]

Detective Eric Tonder of the Fairmont Police Department also had tips for individuals to protect themselves from being the victim of fraud.

"Most of it is being vigilant," he said.


"We still get reports of the ...

www.fairmontsentinel.com, $reference.date [cached]

"We still get reports of the grandparent call," said Fairmont Police detective Eric Tonder.

...
Tonder reminds senior citizens that phone calls and emails requesting bank account numbers and other personal information are red flags for scams and identity theft.
"More seniors are getting online now, but there's also more risk for online fraud," Tonder said.
...
"You have some that peddle useless products to ones that are straight-out fraud," Tonder said. "Some of these may give a long spiel, or jump back and forth just to confuse the person, and get them to agree to paying $80 a month for vitamins that cost $10 at the store. It's not illegal, but they can still be reported to the Better Business Bureau."
One suggestion is to make sure all phone numbers are on the "Do not call" list.
"There is a scam where people will offer to put your number on the 'Do not call' list," Tonder said. "Some even charge for this service. But it does not cost to sign up for the 'Do not call' list."
And numbers can be bumped off the list if you sign up for something without reading the fine print.
"Sometimes you make a purchase with a company, and they could sell your information to any other company under their umbrella," Tonder said.
What may be even more heartbreaking than losing money over the phone or the Internet is when the crime is committed by someone trusted and loved.
"For caretaker exploitation, it's typically an older person, single, isolated, but needing assistance because they've become physically or cognitively impaired," Tonder said.
...
"Financial institutions around here are good about questioning things like that, such as a customer that's always been frugal is suddenly taking out thousand-dollar withdrawals," Tonder said. "They may notice if someone is suddenly accompanying them on all their visits or is doing all the banking things for them. They report these things if they feel it's appropriate."
The same has happened for some seniors who almost fell for the "grandchild" call.
"Walmart is popular for their wire transfers, and we've had people there call us when they suspected a scam, and sure enough that was what it was," Tonder said.
Financial abuse may go unreported by a person even if they are aware of it, due to shame and embarrassment.
"They may think that if they can't handle their money, that they'll be forced to move into a nursing home," Tonder said. "There's also that close relationship factor; once they realize it's a granddaughter or a son, then they decide they don't want to press charges."
The way to avoid misunderstandings and avoid potential exploitation within the family is for the whole family to discuss and plan before older members of the family are in need of care.
"It is easier to do when you're well," Tonder said.


"We still get reports of the ...

www.fairmontsentinel.com, $reference.date [cached]

"We still get reports of the grandparent call," said Fairmont Police detective Eric Tonder.

...
Tonder reminds senior citizens that phone calls and emails requesting bank account numbers and other personal information are red flags for scams and identity theft.
"More seniors are getting online now, but there's also more risk for online fraud," Tonder said.
...
"You have some that peddle useless products to ones that are straight-out fraud," Tonder said. "Some of these may give a long spiel, or jump back and forth just to confuse the person, and get them to agree to paying $80 a month for vitamins that cost $10 at the store. It's not illegal, but they can still be reported to the Better Business Bureau."
One suggestion is to make sure all phone numbers are on the "Do not call" list.
"There is a scam where people will offer to put your number on the 'Do not call' list," Tonder said. "Some even charge for this service. But it does not cost to sign up for the 'Do not call' list."
And numbers can be bumped off the list if you sign up for something without reading the fine print.
"Sometimes you make a purchase with a company, and they could sell your information to any other company under their umbrella," Tonder said.
What may be even more heartbreaking than losing money over the phone or the Internet is when the crime is committed by someone trusted and loved.
"For caretaker exploitation, it's typically an older person, single, isolated, but needing assistance because they've become physically or cognitively impaired," Tonder said.
...
"Financial institutions around here are good about questioning things like that, such as a customer that's always been frugal is suddenly taking out thousand-dollar withdrawals," Tonder said. "They may notice if someone is suddenly accompanying them on all their visits or is doing all the banking things for them. They report these things if they feel it's appropriate."
The same has happened for some seniors who almost fell for the "grandchild" call.
"Walmart is popular for their wire transfers, and we've had people there call us when they suspected a scam, and sure enough that was what it was," Tonder said.
Financial abuse may go unreported by a person even if they are aware of it, due to shame and embarrassment.
"They may think that if they can't handle their money, that they'll be forced to move into a nursing home," Tonder said. "There's also that close relationship factor; once they realize it's a granddaughter or a son, then they decide they don't want to press charges."
The way to avoid misunderstandings and avoid potential exploitation within the family is for the whole family to discuss and plan before older members of the family are in need of care.
"It is easier to do when you're well," Tonder said.

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