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Wrong Eric Milbrandt?

Eric C. Milbrandt

Marine Lab Director

Sanibel-Captiva Conservation Foundation

HQ Phone:  (239) 472-2329

Direct Phone: (239) ***-****direct phone

Email: e***@***.org

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Sanibel-Captiva Conservation Foundation

3333 SANIBEL CAPTIVA RD

Sanibel, Florida,33957

United States

Company Description

SCCF (the Sanibel-Captiva Conservation Foundation) is dedicated to the conservation of coastal habitats and aquatic resources on Sanibel and Captiva and in the surrounding watershed through environmental education, land acquisition, landscaping for wildlife, m...more

Web References(72 Total References)


Pine Island Sound Scallop Search - cape-coral-daily-breeze.com | News, sports, community info. - Cape Coral Daily Breeze

cape-coral-daily-breeze.com [cached]

The data collected with the scallop search, Sanibel-Captiva Conservation Foundation Marine Laboratory Director Eric Milbrandt said targets where they are consistently seeing adult individuals.
"It allows us to compare it with the other bays in Florida. The population is either high, or low and it fluctuates. It helps the state fishery managers understand how to set the limit for the Big Bend area. Maybe if there is really good high abundance statewide, they would increase the number you can collect. With fishery management you want to keep a number of individuals from being harvested, so they can spawn every year," Milbrandt said. Milbrandt said they wanted it to be quantitative and scientific, a citizen science effort. Milbrandt said the volunteers count scallops and measure their shell height before putting them back where they were found. They have to describe the grass and see all of the animals that are living there," Milbrandt said. Milbrandt said one of the first projects SCCF did in 2003, at the lab, was with a staff scientist who studied scallops in the Big Bend region of Florida. Milbrandt said their staff scientist would go out and survey with the FWRI, the agency and state responsible for all of the fisheries. It was long known, he said, that the scallop fishery locally was decimated and the cause is still debatable. "There are diversions of freshwater from the Everglades and the Caloosahatchee. The construction of the Sanibel Causeway also changed some of the ways water moves in Pine Island Sound. At the same time there was a large capture fishery and a lot of marine and invertebrates in particular were boom or bust. They could be very abundant one year and then they can almost be non existent the next year depending on the environmental conditions," Milbrandt said. "They spawn in the water columns, larvae spend a lot of time in the water column and then they settle on sea grass." To survive, the bay scallops need sea grass areas. In the 1990s, Milbrandt said they closed the fishery for scallops locally because there were not enough adults. "We, with the state, were monitoring the adults and how many there were. We were also monitoring, and continue to every month from Pineland Marina to Tarpon Bay and a little bit in San Carlos Bay, spat settlement. So we deploy cinder blocks with a citrus bag and float in the sea grass areas. We collect those and the number of spat, which are little baby scallops that are settling on the bags," Milbrandt said. Milbrandt said the whole idea behind collecting all of this data about bay scallops is to someday possibly restore the population. Milbrandt said those scallops are put into a cage in Tarpon Bay, so they can live their entire life cycle. "They grow happily in the cage. They start off at 20 millimeters and grow to be 65 or 70 millimeters. They spend the whole summer growing and around this time of year they start to spawn and then they die," he said of the filter feeders. Milbrandt said they are ingraining some scallop larvae into Tarpon Bay because the cage is sort of enclosed. "If you have scallops you typically have a very stable forest," Milbrandt said, adding that scallops filter and keep the water clear, so it's not murky.


Home || SCCF

sccf.org [cached]

Dr. Eric Milbrandt
Marine Laboratory Director emilbran@sccf.org Dr. Eric Milbrandt began his career in marine science in N. California at Humboldt State University. His first course in Invertebrate Zoology at the Telonicher Marine Laboratory in Trinidad helped to inspire a career in marine science. Because of the positive experiences and valuable tools both in the lab and in the field, Dr. Milbrandt decided to pursue a graduate degree in marine science. He was accepted at the University of Oregon to study at the Oregon Institute of Marine Biology in Charleston, OR. During his Ph.D., Eric received a Graduate Research Fellowship from the South Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve to study the microbial ecology of the South Slough Estuary. While writing his dissertation, he was offered the position of Research Scientist at SCCF. He returned to OIMB to defend in the spring of 2003 and has been contributing to the SCCF ever since. During his transition to Florida, Dr. Milbrandt established several permanent mangrove forest plots to study the effects of human activities on mangrove reproduction, recruitment and forest structure. He has published numerous peer-reviewed journal articles on the recovery of mangroves after hurricane disturbance and the effect of sea level rise on black mangrove recruitment. He has also led several grant-supported efforts to restore the tidal hydrology to Clam Bayou, then to enhance and restore mangrove shorelines. At SCCF, Dr. Milbrandt has been instrumental in the establishment of RECON (River Estuary Coastal Observing Network) which is providing Real-time information to advance SCCF policies. This tool introduces the Marine Laboratory to difficult socio-economic challenges in the policy arena and helps support the collaborative meetings and influences of the Southwest Florida Stakeholders. RECON also enhances research at the lab including in numerous water quality studies around Sanibel and Captiva Islands and in cooperation with the USFWS in J.N. "Ding" Darling National Wildlife Refuge. In 2011, Dr. Milbrandt was named the third SCCF Marine Laboratory Director. He serves as a reviewer of manuscripts for Estuaries and Coasts, Limnology and Oceanography, Botanica Marina, the Journal of Wetland Ecology and Management, and Hydrobiologia. He is a Graduate Faculty at Florida Gulf Coast University and an affiliate member of the Coastal Watershed Institute.


Home || SCCF

www.sccf.org [cached]

Dr. Eric Milbrandt
Marine Laboratory Director emilbran@sccf.org Dr. Eric Milbrandt began his career in marine science in N. California at Humboldt State University. His first course in Invertebrate Zoology at the Telonicher Marine Laboratory in Trinidad helped to inspire a career in marine science. Because of the positive experiences and valuable tools both in the lab and in the field, Dr. Milbrandt decided to pursue a graduate degree in marine science. He was accepted at the University of Oregon to study at the Oregon Institute of Marine Biology in Charleston, OR. During his Ph.D., Eric received a Graduate Research Fellowship from the South Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve to study the microbial ecology of the South Slough Estuary. While writing his dissertation, he was offered the position of Research Scientist at SCCF. He returned to OIMB to defend in the spring of 2003 and has been contributing to the SCCF ever since. During his transition to Florida, Dr. Milbrandt established several permanent mangrove forest plots to study the effects of human activities on mangrove reproduction, recruitment and forest structure. He has published numerous peer-reviewed journal articles on the recovery of mangroves after hurricane disturbance and the effect of sea level rise on black mangrove recruitment. He has also led several grant-supported efforts to restore the tidal hydrology to Clam Bayou, then to enhance and restore mangrove shorelines. At SCCF, Dr. Milbrandt has been instrumental in the establishment of RECON (River Estuary Coastal Observing Network) which is providing Real-time information to advance SCCF policies. This tool introduces the Marine Laboratory to difficult socio-economic challenges in the policy arena and helps support the collaborative meetings and influences of the Southwest Florida Stakeholders. RECON also enhances research at the lab including in numerous water quality studies around Sanibel and Captiva Islands and in cooperation with the USFWS in J.N. "Ding" Darling National Wildlife Refuge. In 2011, Dr. Milbrandt was named the third SCCF Marine Laboratory Director. He serves as a reviewer of manuscripts for Estuaries and Coasts, Limnology and Oceanography, Botanica Marina, the Journal of Wetland Ecology and Management, and Hydrobiologia. He is a Graduate Faculty at Florida Gulf Coast University and an affiliate member of the Coastal Watershed Institute.


Sanibel-Captiva Conservation Foundation Staff members

www.sccf.org [cached]

Dr. Eric Milbrandt, Director
Dr. Eric Milbrandt Director emilbran@sccf.org Eric Milbrandt CV Dr. Eric Milbrandt began his career in marine science in N. California at Humboldt State University. His first course in Invertebrate Zoology at the Telonicher Marine Laboratory in Trinidad helped to inspire a career in marine science. Because of the positive experiences and valuable tools both in the lab and in the field, Dr. Milbrandt decided to pursue a graduate degree in marine science. He was accepted at the University of Oregon to study at the Oregon Institute of Marine Biology in Charleston, OR. During his Ph.D., Eric received a Graduate Research Fellowship from the South Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve to study the microbial ecology of the South Slough Estuary. While writing his dissertation, he was offered the position of Research Scientist at SCCF. He returned to OIMB to defend in the spring of 2003 and has been contributing to the SCCF ever since. During his transition to Florida, Dr. Milbrandt established several permanent mangrove forest plots to study the effects of human activities on mangrove reproduction, recruitment and forest structure. He has published numerous peer-reviewed journal articles on the recovery of mangroves after hurricane disturbance and the effect of sea level rise on black mangrove recruitment. He has also led several grant-supported efforts to restore the tidal hydrology to Clam Bayou, then to enhance and restore mangrove shorelines. At SCCF, Dr. Milbrandt has been instrumental in the establishment of RECON (River Estuary Coastal Observing Network) which is providing Real-time information to advance SCCF policies. This tool introduces the Marine Laboratory to difficult socio-economic challenges in the policy arena and helps support the collaborative meetings and influences of the Southwest Florida Stakeholders. RECON also enhances research at the lab including in numerous water quality studies around Sanibel and Captiva Islands and in cooperation with the USFWS in J.N. "Ding" Darling National Wildlife Refuge. In 2011, Dr. Milbrandt was named the third SCCF Marine Laboratory Director. He serves as a reviewer of manuscripts for Estuaries and Coasts, Limnology and Oceanography, Botanica Marina, the Journal of Wetland Ecology and Management, and Hydrobiologia. He is a Graduate Faculty at Florida Gulf Coast University and an affiliate member of the Coastal Watershed Institute.


Untitled Document

www.sccf.org [cached]

Dr. Eric Milbrandt Research Scientist Email Dr. Milbrandt


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