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Wrong Eric Endersby?

Eric Endersby

Director

Morro Bay Harbor Festival Inc

HQ Phone:  (800) 366-6043

Email: e***@***.us

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Morro Bay Harbor Festival Inc

895 Napa Ave Suite A-3

Morro Bay, California,93442

United States

Company Description

The primary purpose of the Morro Bay Harbor Festival is to celebrate and promote Morro Bay and it's Harbor: the local fishermen, fisherwomen, and marine related industries, the harbor department, Coast Guard, and the National Estuary Program. The aim is to sha...more

Background Information

Employment History

Harbor Director

City of Morro Bay


Web References(96 Total References)


July 2014 - The ROCK

www.rockofthecoast.com [cached]

"Historically, over the years," said Morro Bay Harbor Director Eric Endersby, "the (Monterey Bay) sanctuary superintendents, and there have been a few of them, have dabbled in fishery management as much as they can and tried to establish marine protected areas and fishery restrictions, and basically, in the words of the fishermen, break the promise.
"The big fear we have as a community and as a fishing community is the affect on commercial fishermen," Endersby said. "The commercial fishermen are so highly regulated, we are the most regulated fishery pretty much on the planet, with marine protected areas and all the seasons and closed areas, lots of layers of protection both by the state out to three miles, and by the federal government through its regional fishery management councils." The other part of 'the promise,' according to Endersby, was that the harbors would have a "carve-out," and wouldn't be considered in the sanctuary because of industrial activity such as dredging and disposal going on within sanctuary waters "that's not necessarily in tune with what the sanctuary's protections typically are. ... The sanctuary has historically been another relatively difficult hurdle to get over during the planning and permitting processes, so it's been a rocky relationship with the sanctuary governance up there and the local fishermen and communities. "Unfortunately, it's kind of poisoned the sanctuary waters here on the west coast, and one of the reasons why our fishermen down here in our community have historically stood up so adamantly against sanctuary designations in our waters because we saw the sort of promise getting broken or getting stretched or ignored up north, and basically we didn't trust the sanctuary governance to keep its promise." Fred Collins, tribal administrator of the Northern Chumash Tribal Council based in San Luis Obispo, met with Hafer, MDCFO director Jeremiah O'Brien and Endersby earlier this year about the Chumash Heritage Sanctuary. I haven't been deep enough into it," said Endersby. Said Endersby: "It became pretty evident that sanctuary designation is a great tool to quickly address those bigger, sort of non-fishing threats, but there's always the fishing in the background, and the way the Monterey Sanctuary has acted over the decades, they've basically burned all the bridges with the fisherman, to a degree with the communities, and the trust that they won't get into fishery regulation, because they've tried and tried and tried, and it's unfortunate that the trust bridge has been burned." "Making the leap from federal control to local control," questioned Endersby, "I don't know how that would functionally work."


Ed - The ROCK

www.rockofthecoast.com [cached]

Categories LocalTags Bill Douros, Bruce Gibson, Eric Endersby, Jeremiah O'Brien, Mark Tognazinni, Morro Bay Commercial Fishermen's Association, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Noah Smukler, Tom Hafer
Categories OpinionsTags Bill Douros, Bruce Gibson, Eric Endersby, Jeremiah O'Brien, Mark Tognazinni, Morro Bay Commercial Fishermen's Association, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Noah Smukler, Tom Hafer "Historically, over the years," said Morro Bay Harbor Director Eric Endersby, "the (Monterey Bay) sanctuary superintendents, and there have been a few of them, have dabbled in fishery management as much as they can and tried to establish marine protected areas and fishery restrictions, and basically, in the words of the fishermen, break the promise. "The big fear we have as a community and as a fishing community is the affect on commercial fishermen," Endersby said. "The commercial fishermen are so highly regulated, we are the most regulated fishery pretty much on the planet, with marine protected areas and all the seasons and closed areas, lots of layers of protection both by the state out to three miles, and by the federal government through its regional fishery management councils." The other part of 'the promise,' according to Endersby, was that the harbors would have a "carve-out," and wouldn't be considered in the sanctuary because of industrial activity such as dredging and disposal going on within sanctuary waters "that's not necessarily in tune with what the sanctuary's protections typically are. ... The sanctuary has historically been another relatively difficult hurdle to get over during the planning and permitting processes, so it's been a rocky relationship with the sanctuary governance up there and the local fishermen and communities. "Unfortunately, it's kind of poisoned the sanctuary waters here on the west coast, and one of the reasons why our fishermen down here in our community have historically stood up so adamantly against sanctuary designations in our waters because we saw the sort of promise getting broken or getting stretched or ignored up north, and basically we didn't trust the sanctuary governance to keep its promise." Fred Collins, tribal administrator of the Northern Chumash Tribal Council based in San Luis Obispo, met with Hafer, MDCFO director Jeremiah O'Brien and Endersby earlier this year about the Chumash Heritage Sanctuary. I haven't been deep enough into it," said Endersby. Said Endersby: "It became pretty evident that sanctuary designation is a great tool to quickly address those bigger, sort of non-fishing threats, but there's always the fishing in the background, and the way the Monterey Sanctuary has acted over the decades, they've basically burned all the bridges with the fisherman, to a degree with the communities, and the trust that they won't get into fishery regulation, because they've tried and tried and tried, and it's unfortunate that the trust bridge has been burned." "Making the leap from federal control to local control," questioned Endersby, "I don't know how that would functionally work."


www.rockofthecoast.com

Categories LocalTags Bill Douros, Bruce Gibson, Eric Endersby, Jeremiah O'Brien, Mark Tognazinni, Morro Bay Commercial Fishermen's Association, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Noah Smukler, Tom Hafer
Categories OpinionsTags Bill Douros, Bruce Gibson, Eric Endersby, Jeremiah O'Brien, Mark Tognazinni, Morro Bay Commercial Fishermen's Association, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Noah Smukler, Tom Hafer "Historically, over the years," said Morro Bay Harbor Director Eric Endersby, "the (Monterey Bay) sanctuary superintendents, and there have been a few of them, have dabbled in fishery management as much as they can and tried to establish marine protected areas and fishery restrictions, and basically, in the words of the fishermen, break the promise. "The big fear we have as a community and as a fishing community is the affect on commercial fishermen," Endersby said. "The commercial fishermen are so highly regulated, we are the most regulated fishery pretty much on the planet, with marine protected areas and all the seasons and closed areas, lots of layers of protection both by the state out to three miles, and by the federal government through its regional fishery management councils." The other part of 'the promise,' according to Endersby, was that the harbors would have a "carve-out," and wouldn't be considered in the sanctuary because of industrial activity such as dredging and disposal going on within sanctuary waters "that's not necessarily in tune with what the sanctuary's protections typically are. … The sanctuary has historically been another relatively difficult hurdle to get over during the planning and permitting processes, so it's been a rocky relationship with the sanctuary governance up there and the local fishermen and communities. "Unfortunately, it's kind of poisoned the sanctuary waters here on the west coast, and one of the reasons why our fishermen down here in our community have historically stood up so adamantly against sanctuary designations in our waters because we saw the sort of promise getting broken or getting stretched or ignored up north, and basically we didn't trust the sanctuary governance to keep its promise." Fred Collins, tribal administrator of the Northern Chumash Tribal Council based in San Luis Obispo, met with Hafer, MDCFO director Jeremiah O'Brien and Endersby earlier this year about the Chumash Heritage Sanctuary. I haven't been deep enough into it," said Endersby. Said Endersby: "It became pretty evident that sanctuary designation is a great tool to quickly address those bigger, sort of non-fishing threats, but there's always the fishing in the background, and the way the Monterey Sanctuary has acted over the decades, they've basically burned all the bridges with the fisherman, to a degree with the communities, and the trust that they won't get into fishery regulation, because they've tried and tried and tried, and it's unfortunate that the trust bridge has been burned." "Making the leap from federal control to local control," questioned Endersby, "I don't know how that would functionally work."


harbormaster.org

Eric Endersby, Chairman
eendersby@morro-bay.ca.us


harbormaster.org

Eric Endersby
SECRETARY: Morro Bay Harbor


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