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Wrong Ellen Aasum?

Ellen Aasum

Professor

Universitetet i Tromsø

Email: e***@***.no

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Universitetet i Tromsø

Web References(2 Total References)


www.heartandmetabolism.com

Ellen Aasum
Cardiovascular Research Group Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, Norway Correspondence: Ellen Aasum, Cardiovascular Research Group, Institute of Medical Biology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, N-9037 Tromsø, Norway. Tel: +47 77646486; fax: +47 77645440; e-mail: ellen.aasum@uit.no


www.bioexchange.com [cached]

"Hearts from diabetic db/db mice, a model of type 2 diabetes, exhibit left ventricular failure and altered metabolism of exogenous substrates," explained Ellen Aasum and colleagues at the University of Tromso in Norway. The investigators treated 8-week-old db/db mice with 25 to 38 mg/kg per day of the PPAR-alpha ligand, BM 17.0744, for 4 to 6 weeks, and measured the effect of treatment on cardiac function and metabolism. The elevated concentrations of glucose (34.0 mM), fatty acids (2.0 mM), and triglycerides (0.9 mM) found at the beginning of treatment dropped to normal levels after BM 17.0744 therapy (10.8, 1.1, and 0.6 mM, respectively).Mice that received BM 17.0744 also had significantly lower levels of plasma insulin than did control mice. Fatty acid oxidation dropped by 50% in mice that had undergone long-term BM 17.0744 treatment, resulting in a 1.7-fold increase in glycolysis and 2.3-fold increase in glucose oxidation. The corresponding author for this study is Ellen Aasum, University of Tromso, Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Medical Biology, Department of Medical Physiology, N-9037 Tromso, Norway.E-mail: ellenaa@fagmed.uit.no. A search at www.NewsRx.net using the search term "type 2 diabetes therapy" yielded 146 articles in 22 specialized reports. Key points reported in this study include: • Elevated levels of glucose, fatty acids, and triglycerides found in diabetic db/db mice were normalized by treatment with BM 17.0744, a novel peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPAR-alpha) ligand


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