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Wrong Ehud Isacoff?

Ehud Y. Isacoff

Professor of Neurobiology and Chair

Berkeley

HQ Phone:  (510) 845-7793

Email: e***@***.edu

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Berkeley

2736 Bancroft Way

Berkeley, California,94704

United States

Company Description

The first school of public health west of the Mississippi, the University of California, Berkeley, School of Public Health was founded in 1943 on the Berkeley campus. It is one of 50 schools accredited by the Council on Education for Public Health. The UC Berk... more.

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Web References(39 Total References)


Faculty | QB3

www.qb3.org [cached]

Ehud Isacoff


Board of Scientific Governors - The Lowy Medical Research Institute

www.lmri.net [cached]

Ehud Isacoff
Ehud Isacoff, PH.D. Chair and Professor of Neurobiology, University of California, Berkeley Dr. Isacoff is a Professor at UC Berkeley, in the Department of Neuroscience. He has been a pioneer of optogenetics research, using light to study neural circuits and neural transmission. He applies this research to neuronal diseases, including retinal disease, to restore neural function.


www.aftau.org

The researchers, collaborating with Prof. Joel Hirsch of TAU's Faculty of Life Sciences, Prof. Dominic Walsh of Harvard University, and Prof. Ehud Isacoff of University of California Berkeley, harnessed a combination of cutting-edge high-resolution optical imaging, biophysical methods and molecular biology to examine APP-dependent signalling in neural cultures, brain slices, and mouse models.


Neurobiology Seminar Series 2014-2015 - Children’s Hospital Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Center (IDDRC)

www.iddrc.org [cached]

11/03 Ehud Isacoff - University of California, Berkeley


newscenter.berkeley.edu

"The dog has a retina very similar to ours, much more so than mice, so when you want to bring a visual therapy to the clinic, you want to first show that it works in a large animal model of the disease," said lead researcher Ehud Isacoff, professor of molecular and cell biology at UC Berkeley.
Isacoff, Flannery and UC Berkeley colleagues have developed several optogenetic techniques for restoring light-sensitivity to surviving retinal cells other than the photoreceptors. The researchers then inject a chemical photoswitch into the eye, "basically, a glutamate dangling on a light-sensitive string," said Isacoff, "which anchors to the modified receptor and stuffs the glutamate into its docking site on the receptor when activated by light. Our next step is to figure out how good they are at telling images apart," said Isacoff, who holds the Class of 1933 chair. "And along the way, we developed tools that could be applied to the basic science of how synapses work and how neural circuits work," Isacoff added. "When we put the photoswitched channels into bipolar cells and record the output of the ganglion cells, we see complicated patterns that look a lot like the activity you get in a normal retina, compared to the on-off activity you get when you put the same photoswitch into a ganglion cell," Isacoff said. "This is not necessarily a disadvantage," Isacoff said, "because the therapy can be stopped, and new photo-sensitive chemicals can be tried as they are improved."


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