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This profile was last updated on 5/29/08  and contains information from public web pages.

Edward B. Gould

Wrong Edward B. Gould?

Owner

Pelican Roost
 
Background

Employment History

  • Notorious Con Artist
  • Vegas Scandal
Web References
Vegas Scandal
vegasscandal.com, 29 May 2008 [cached]
A notorious con artist, Gould in the early 1990s was convicted of federal charges of running a telemarketing scam that cheated seniors out of millions of dollars. Gould later told Congress about how con artists operate and thrive.
Mortensen and Gould had a passing relationship years earlier through a mutual girlfriend.
...
They were reunited behind bars, where Gould was in on several state charges.
"OK, so you were nailed for racketeering. Doesn't mean you can't make an honest deal," Mortensen told Gould.
...
Gould, however, gravitated to dubious endeavors.
And as he so often did when he stumbled upon a provocative one, he ran to the authorities.
...
The two men brainstormed on possible uses for the money Mortensen would get from selling the house for a pittance to Gould.
When Mortensen came up with an intriguing plan, Gould went to police.
...
What's in it for me, Gould wanted to know.
The answer: Every one of Gould's pending cases would go away within a few weeks.
THE TARGETS
Gould scrapped his original plan to resell the house and sought a home-improvement loan against its equity.
The move was part of his and Mortensen's deal, a way to equip both with immediate cash.
Gould showed investigators letters from Mortensen that detailed how and to whom Mortensen's part of the loan money was to be dispensed.
...
Shortly after his interview with local and federal agents, Gould was put in Mortensen's cell and outfitted with a wire.
There, the men fleshed out the bribery scheme.
In one recorded conversation, Mortensen told Gould he thought Nancy Saitta had a strong legal basis to rule in his favor.
Gould responded: "Then 100,000 more says she's really in your favor."
...
So Gould got the money.
He shopped for a loan from his jail cell, with help from his mother, a local bail bondsman, and assorted others who spent dozens of hours on the phone coordinating with each other.
Within a few weeks, it was nearly his.
But there was one last thing: The lender needed Gould to meet some conditions, including showing he was employed and related to Mortensen.
Gould was going to do what it took to get the loan, so he lied on the form. He said that he worked for the bail bondsman and that he was Mortensen's stepson.
Gould's dealings caught the attention of an elder-abuse detective who was investigating the transfer and retransfer of Cossovel's home.
The day before Gould's loan was final, his police handlers confronted him about the other detective's investigation.
The bribery investigation continued, but the accusations would come back to bite Gould later.
...
Gould spoke by phone with Parris about a meeting the attorney had with Whiteley.
...
That Monday, on the recommendation of the district attorney's office, District Judge Sally Loehrer dismissed seven felony cases against Gould and sentenced him to probation on another four.
...
Long told Gould: "I think Metro just whitewashed this whole thing.
...
Gould: "I just got out the other day and Ron wants me to meet up with you and give you the money."
...
Long and Gould never had.
...
It was about 10 in the evening when Gould, cash in hand, got together with Long in a fifth-floor room at Boulder Station.
...
A clearly surprised Gould said he believed the money was for another purpose.
Prodded by Gould, Long mentioned the Saittas only once during the first part of the meeting.
...
Neither would they share records of law enforcement visits to Gould.
...
A day after Long and Gould met, Parris redeposited $40,000 in the bank, where it would remain.
...
Mortensen, meanwhile, hadn't heard back from Gould or Long and was getting impatient.
...
In another letter to Kopystenski, herself a former cop and convict, Mortensen said a corrections officer told him that Gould was a police informant.
...
A week after Mortensen learned of Gould's cooperation with police, and nearly two weeks after Long and Gould met at the hotel, police sat down with Long.
...
But police knew from Long's conversations with Gould that he willingly met at the hotel.
...
"Gould told Long that he and Mortensen had talked about campaign contributions.
...
The first time that Long had heard about any campaign contributions was when he met with Gould.
...
His mission: To find out whether Mortensen - or Gould - was trying to bribe Nancy Saitta.
...
There were now two informants, Gould and Long, working at cross-purposes.
...
Gould duped me.
...
In the wake of the collapse of the bribery investigation, police took as possible evidence what was left in Gould's Bank of America trust account, about $91,000.
The bribery investigation was over, but the FBI and Las Vegas police chose to take the probe in another direction.
They examined the dealings involving Cossovel's home and the steps Gould took to get his loan.
A week after Gould and Long met in the hotel room, Mortensen's mother, Sandra Adamson, interviewed with Las Vegas police and denied signing a deed that gifted the house to Gould. A week after Gould and Long met in the hotel room, Mortensen's mother, Sandra Adamson, interviewed with Las Vegas police and denied signing a deed that gifted the house to Gould.
...
In March 2007, Gould was charged with theft and forgery, for lying on his loan application and forging Adamson's signature. He could not post $100,000 bond and remained in custody for eight months. He faces up to 14 years in prison, if convicted on both charges. Gould has pleaded innocent.
...
Just as Gould was becoming a target of investigators, Nancy Saitta defeated incumbent Becker to secure a seat on the state Supreme Court.
...
Edward Gould was told he needed to provide a full and honest disclosure" in reference to "the information concerning the house and the alleged criminal act."
Were Gould's alleged crimes committed in the course of helping the police? Or did the con man somehow con police?
Gould, now 43 and working again as a telemarketer, filed a court motion to get any evidence that could affect the credibility of law enforcement witnesses.
Through that, he got access to dozens of hours of audio and video and hundreds of pages of documents from the bribery investigation. He shared the materials with the Review-Journal.
...
"No one disputes that Mr. Gould worked with police to try to expose a bribery plot.
...
The records trove was made public by Edward B. Gould - a 6-foot-8, 270-pound convicted racketeer with a colorful past in crime, telemarketing and wrestling. He had tipped authorities to Mortensen's plan.
Gould, known in the ring as "Eddie Mountainman," now calls himself a disgruntled informant. After working undercover for investigators, he ended up indicted in the scheme - even though his alleged frauds were carried out under almost constant police or FBI monitoring.
"I thought I was doing the right thing. I still do," said Gould, 43.
...
Gould had a prior conviction for telemarketing scams and faced new charges involving drugs and fraud.
...
Doesn't mean you can't make an honest deal," Mortensen wrote in a note to Gould.
...
The deal: Gould would buy the disputed property from Mortensen for $1.3 million, with no money down and two years to pay.
...
Gould figured he could resell it for twice as much and pocket the difference.
"Hey, for that kind of deal I'd parade down Fremont Street in a Speedo and nipple pasties," he said in an interview.
...
On May 23, 2006, San Luis Obispo County recorded Gould as the new owner of Pelican Roost.
Then, according to Gould, Mortensen said he couldn't wait two years for his money. He needed some right away for his family, his legal team - and the judge.
"It's one thing to buy some real estate; it's another to bribe a judge," Gould said. He notified authorities.
Police were skeptical. But real estate records confirmed the property transfers and the curious role of the former FBI agent. Gould offered to gather additional evidence with a concealed tape recorder.
Authorities had him transferred to Cell 8, replacing a
Vegas Scandal - The Edward Gould Story | A cop, a murder, a bribe, an informant: Just another day in Sin City
vegasscandal.com, 29 May 2008 [cached]
Edward B. Gould is a giant of a man, towering 6-foot-8, 270-pounds - and he's also a convicted racketeer with a colorful past in crime, telemarketing and pro wrestling.
While serving time in Nevada, Gould tipped authorities to cop-turned-murderer Ron Mortensen'?s plan to bribe a judge via a powerful city prosecutor.?
HOME About the Film Production
But when metro police insisted on taking over the case from the FBI, Gould ended up indicted in the scheme they had orchestrated. ?"I thought I was doing the right thing.
...
Tags: Edward Gould
...
A notorious con artist, Gould in the early 1990s was convicted of federal charges of running a telemarketing scam that cheated seniors out of millions of dollars. Gould later told Congress about how con artists operate and thrive.
Mortensen and Gould had a passing relationship years earlier through a mutual girlfriend.
...
They were reunited behind bars, where Gould was in on several state charges.
"OK, so you were nailed for racketeering. Doesn't mean you can't make an honest deal," Mortensen told Gould.
...
Gould, however, gravitated to dubious endeavors.
And as he so often did when he stumbled upon a provocative one, he ran to the authorities.
...
The two men brainstormed on possible uses for the money Mortensen would get from selling the house for a pittance to Gould.
When Mortensen came up with an intriguing plan, Gould went to police.
...
What's in it for me, Gould wanted to know.
The answer: Every one of Gould's pending cases would go away within a few weeks.
THE TARGETS
Gould scrapped his original plan to resell the house and sought a home-improvement loan against its equity.
The move was part of his and Mortensen's deal, a way to equip both with immediate cash.
Gould showed investigators letters from Mortensen that detailed how and to whom Mortensen's part of the loan money was to be dispensed.
...
Shortly after his interview with local and federal agents, Gould was put in Mortensen's cell and outfitted with a wire.
There, the men fleshed out the bribery scheme.
In one recorded conversation, Mortensen told Gould he thought Nancy Saitta had a strong legal basis to rule in his favor.
Gould responded: "Then 100,000 more says she's really in your favor."
...
So Gould got the money.
He shopped for a loan from his jail cell, with help from his mother, a local bail bondsman, and assorted others who spent dozens of hours on the phone coordinating with each other.
Within a few weeks, it was nearly his.
But there was one last thing: The lender needed Gould to meet some conditions, including showing he was employed and related to Mortensen.
Gould was going to do what it took to get the loan, so he lied on the form. He said that he worked for the bail bondsman and that he was Mortensen's stepson.
Gould's dealings caught the attention of an elder-abuse detective who was investigating the transfer and retransfer of Cossovel's home.
The day before Gould's loan was final, his police handlers confronted him about the other detective's investigation.
The bribery investigation continued, but the accusations would come back to bite Gould later.
...
Gould spoke by phone with Parris about a meeting the attorney had with Whiteley.
...
That Monday, on the recommendation of the district attorney's office, District Judge Sally Loehrer dismissed seven felony cases against Gould and sentenced him to probation on another four.
...
Long told Gould: "I think Metro just whitewashed this whole thing.
...
Gould: "I just got out the other day and Ron wants me to meet up with you and give you the money."
...
Long and Gould never had.
...
It was about 10 in the evening when Gould, cash in hand, got together with Long in a fifth-floor room at Boulder Station.
...
A clearly surprised Gould said he believed the money was for another purpose.
Prodded by Gould, Long mentioned the Saittas only once during the first part of the meeting.
...
Neither would they share records of law enforcement visits to Gould.
...
A day after Long and Gould met, Parris redeposited $40,000 in the bank, where it would remain.
...
Mortensen, meanwhile, hadn't heard back from Gould or Long and was getting impatient.
...
In another letter to Kopystenski, herself a former cop and convict, Mortensen said a corrections officer told him that Gould was a police informant.
...
"Reliable sources told him that Ed was 'wearing a wire' on me," Mortensen wrote.
...
A week after Mortensen learned of Gould's cooperation with police, and nearly two weeks after Long and Gould met at the hotel, police sat down with Long.
...
But police knew from Long's conversations with Gould that he willingly met at the hotel.
...
"Gould told Long that he and Mortensen had talked about campaign contributions.
...
The first time that Long had heard about any campaign contributions was when he met with Gould.
...
His mission: To find out whether Mortensen - or Gould - was trying to bribe Nancy Saitta.
...
There were now two informants, Gould and Long, working at cross-purposes.
...
Just tell me honestly, are you trying or is Ed trying to bribe a judge?"
...
Gould duped me.
...
In the wake of the collapse of the bribery investigation, police took as possible evidence what was left in Gould's Bank of America trust account, about $91,000.
The bribery investigation was over, but the FBI and Las Vegas police chose to take the probe in another direction.
They examined the dealings involving Cossovel's home and the steps Gould took to get his loan.
A week after Gould and Long met in the hotel room, Mortensen's mother, Sandra Adamson, interviewed with Las Vegas police and denied signing a deed that gifted the house to Gould. A week after Gould and Long met in the hotel room, Mortensen's mother, Sandra Adamson, interviewed with Las Vegas police and denied signing a deed that gifted the house to Gould.
...
In March 2007, Gould was charged with theft and forgery, for lying on his loan application and forging Adamson's signature. He could not post $100,000 bond and remained in custody for eight months. He faces up to 14 years in prison, if convicted on both charges. Gould has pleaded innocent.
...
Just as Gould was becoming a target of investigators, Nancy Saitta defeated incumbent Becker to secure a seat on the state Supreme Court.
...
Edward Gould was told he needed to provide a full and honest disclosure" in reference to "the information concerning the house and the alleged criminal act."
Were Gould's alleged crimes committed in the course of helping the police? Or did the con man somehow con police?
Gould, now 43 and working again as a telemarketer, filed a court motion to get any evidence that could affect the credibility of law enforcement witnesses.
Through that, he got access to dozens of hours of audio and video and hundreds of pages of documents from the bribery investigation. He shared the materials with the Review-Journal.
...
"No one disputes that Mr. Gould worked with police to try to expose a bribery plot.
Vegas Scandal - The Edward Gould Story | A cop, a murder, a bribe, an informant: Just another day in Sin City
vegasscandal.com, 16 Feb 2009 [cached]
Edward Gould Vegas Scandal - The Edward Gould Story | A cop, a murder, a bribe, an informant: Just another day in Sin City Vegas Scandal > Edward Gould
...
Edward B. Gould is a giant of a man, towering 6-foot-8, 270-pounds - and he's also a convicted racketeer with a colorful past in crime, telemarketing and pro wrestling.
While serving time in Nevada, Gould tipped authorities to cop-turned-murderer Ron Mortensen'?s plan to bribe a judge via a powerful city prosecutor.?
HOME About the Film Production
But when metro police insisted on taking over the case from the FBI, Gould ended up indicted in the scheme they had orchestrated. ?"I thought I was doing the right thing.
...
Archive: Edward Gould
...
Tags: Edward Gould
...
Tags: Edward Gould
Hoping for a new trial, an ex-cop hatched a plan to get money from his ailing grandmother's California house. FBI files say the goal was to bribe a judge. He could work the deal - with a little help.
...
Tags: Edward Gould
...
"To bribe a judge to get out of jail to circumvent the entire integrity of the judicial system," explained Gould.
...
Edward Gould (3)
...
criminal records clark county nevada:[...] He could work the
Vegas Scandal - The Edward Gould Story | A cop, a murder, a bribe, an informant: Just another day in Sin City
vegasscandal.com, 29 May 2008 [cached]
Edward B. Gould is a giant of a man, towering 6-foot-8, 270-pounds - and he's also a convicted racketeer with a colorful past in crime, telemarketing and pro wrestling.
While serving time in Nevada, Gould tipped authorities to cop-turned-murderer Ron Mortensen'?s plan to bribe a judge via a powerful city prosecutor.?
HOME About the Film Production
But when metro police insisted on taking over the case from the FBI, Gould ended up indicted in the scheme they had orchestrated. ?"I thought I was doing the right thing.
...
Tags: Edward Gould
Hoping for a new trial, an ex-cop hatched a plan to get money from his ailing grandmother's California house. FBI files say the goal was to bribe a judge. He could work the deal - with a little help.
...
The records trove was made public by Edward B. Gould - a 6-foot-8, 270-pound convicted racketeer with a colorful past in crime, telemarketing and wrestling. He had tipped authorities to Mortensen's plan.
Gould, known in the ring as "Eddie Mountainman," now calls himself a disgruntled informant. After working undercover for investigators, he ended up indicted in the scheme - even though his alleged frauds were carried out under almost constant police or FBI monitoring.
"I thought I was doing the right thing. I still do," said Gould, 43.
...
Gould had a prior conviction for telemarketing scams and faced new charges involving drugs and fraud.
...
Doesn't mean you can't make an honest deal," Mortensen wrote in a note to Gould.
...
The deal: Gould would buy the disputed property from Mortensen for $1.3 million, with no money down and two years to pay.
...
Gould figured he could resell it for twice as much and pocket the difference.
"Hey, for that kind of deal I'd parade down Fremont Street in a Speedo and nipple pasties," he said in an interview.
...
On May 23, 2006, San Luis Obispo County recorded Gould as the new owner of Pelican Roost.
Then, according to Gould, Mortensen said he couldn't wait two years for his money. He needed some right away for his family, his legal team - and the judge.
"It's one thing to buy some real estate; it's another to bribe a judge," Gould said. He notified authorities.
Police were skeptical. But real estate records confirmed the property transfers and the curious role of the former FBI agent. Gould offered to gather additional evidence with a concealed tape recorder.
Authorities had him transferred to Cell 8, replacing a serial rapist as Mortensen's cellmate. And Las Vegas police opened a joint investigation with the FBI.
Mortensen outlined his plot into a hidden microphone as Gould asked questions.
...
Gould: "You're just swaying the odds."
...
To raise cash for Mortensen, Gould put up Pelican Roost as collateral for a loan.
...
Using a cellblock phone, Gould lined up mortgage brokers, title insurance, appraisals and the like. It took weeks.
"I'm not like Donald Trump who can go into a bank . . . and they give me the money in three days," Gould told police.
...
Along the way, Gould filed less-than-truthful documents. In one, he claimed to be employed by a bail bond company. In another, he invented a family relationship with his cellmate.
"Mr. Mortensen is my stepfather," Gould declared in a handwritten statement directed to "whom it may concern."
...
After deducting lending fees and $68,000 seized by the IRS to satisfy an old tax lien, Gould received $234,290.13. The entire transaction had been arranged over police-monitored phones and via jail-monitored mail.
Gould's loan funded on July 21, 2006, a Friday. The following Monday, 11 felony charges against him were favorably resolved with dismissals or suspended sentences and probation, records show. He was freed from jail.
"That was no coincidence," Gould said, crediting his cooperation with authorities.
Still, no one had yet tried to pay off a judge - or a judge's husband. From an FBI office, Gould called Long to arrange a meeting.
...
Gould brought a black bag crammed with cash and a handwritten letter from Mortensen addressed to "Ken," explaining that only $40,000 was available at the moment.
...
Gould stammered, confused, finally insisting that Long go back to Mortensen and "resolve where this money's going.
...
"You and Eddie never talked about the judge?
...
Gould and Mortensen lost their claims to Pelican Roost.
...
Gould is scheduled for trial in July on charges of forgery and theft stemming from alleged misrepresentations in his application for the $324,000 loan.
He contends that the government prodded him to secure the loan. The misrepresentations were made "with the knowledge, coordination, consent and under the supervision" of police and prosecutors, he said in a federal civil rights suit.
Lt. Dave Logue, head of criminal intelligence for the Las Vegas police, said Gould "was not truthful . . . nor did we direct him to do anything fraudulent."
Gould's defense team won court orders forcing police and prosecutors to turn over their investigative records. Gould gave the whole pile to local reporters and The Times.
Those documents revealed that the investigation may have been compromised by a leak: A jail guard tipped Mortensen that Gould was "wearing a wire.
...
"I've sold my life story," Gould said.
Vegas Scandal - The Edward Gould Story | A cop, a murder, a bribe, an informant: Just another day in Sin City
vegasscandal.com, 6 Aug 2008 [cached]
Edward B. Gould is a giant of a man, towering 6-foot-8, 270-pounds - and he's also a convicted racketeer with a colorful past in crime, telemarketing and pro wrestling.
While serving time in Nevada, Gould tipped authorities to cop-turned-murderer Ron Mortensen'?s plan to bribe a judge via a powerful city prosecutor.?
HOME About the Film Production
But when metro police insisted on taking over the case from the FBI, Gould ended up indicted in the scheme they had orchestrated. ?"I thought I was doing the right thing.
...
Edward Gould
...
In jail, Ronald Mortensen told Edward Gould, who was wearing a wire, about his plan to bribe Nancy Saitta.
...
Edward Gould and Kenneth Long met at Boulder Station to exchange $40,000 in cash that Ronald Mortensen wanted to funnel to Nancy Saitta.
...
Edward Gould's attorney, accompanied by police, withdrew $40,000 in cash, to be used in the bribery investigation.
...
Edward Gould (3)
...
criminal records clark county nevada:[...] He could work the
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