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This profile was last updated on 12/31/08  and contains information from public web pages.

Father Edward H. Flannery

Wrong Father Edward H. Flannery?
 
Background

Employment History

  • Assistant Editor
    paper
  • Editor and Manager
    paper
  • Assistant Editor
    The Bridge
  • Assistant Pastor
    SS
  • Editor
    The Visitor Printing Company

Board Memberships and Affiliations

  • Moderator
    Catholic Laymen's First Friday Club
Web References
The Rhode Island Catholic
thericatholic.com, 31 Dec 2008 [cached]
Father Flannery's legacy: From static to dynamic
...
In July 1955, Bishop McVinney assigned Father Edward H. Flannery to serve as Father Bracq's assistant editor.
...
During these years, Fathers Bracq and Flannery headed a staff of about 30.
...
A year later, in September 1957, after Father Bracq had suffered a heart attack, the bishop lightened his responsibilities by appointing the paper's assistant editor, Father Edward H. Flannery, his successor as editor and manager of the paper.
...
Father Flannery was ordained in May 1937, and had served, after a short summer assignment, as an assistant pastor in the Cathedral of SS.
...
Father Flannery later arranged for Father Keller to speak to the First Friday Club.
...
Beginning in 1950, Father Flannery traveled to New York on Monday and back to St. Joseph's on Friday, a trip he made each week for five years. When in 1955, having read a book review that Father Flannery had written and which was printed on the front page of the Visitor, Bishop McVinney asked its writer if he would be interested in working for the paper. Father Flannery accepted the offer. With Father Flannery's appointment, the Visitor once again had a socially conscious editor. Upon taking charge at the paper, Father Flannery proceeded to "spruce it up a bit. In his view, the paper looked the same each week. Among his innovations was the running of articles written by non-Catholics and supplied by the Religious News Service. Along the same lines, he believed that the paper had become too narrowly focused on Catholic issues alone. In order to widen the Visitor's concerns to include those of the state as a whole, he introduced a column entitled, "What's Right with Rhode Island," which was written by prominent Rhode Islanders, Catholics as well as non-Catholics, and which provided an opportunity to focus on the good things going on in the state. To Father Flannery, one aspect of the state that was not right was in the area of housing discrimination. After Father Anthony Robinson and other concerned citizens formed Citizens United for a Fair Housing Law in Rhode Island in 1958, Father Flannery threw editorial support in the Visitor behind the effort, which also had the support of Bishop McVinney.
...
In 1960, the National Conference of Christians and Jews awarded Father Flannery and The Providence Visitor their National Brotherhood Award in the newspaper editorial and news category. In that same year, the Catholic Press Association recognized Father Flannery's editorial by honoring the paper with and award for "Best Campaign in Public Interest. In the fall of 1960, Father Flannery was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize "for distinguished editorial writing. It would not be until 1965 that proponents of the legislation were able to overcome the reservations of the Rhode Island's lawmakers and secure the passage of the legislation. Among the other changes Father Flannery introduced was the return of a "Letters to the Editor" column which his predecessors had abandoned, as had most Catholic newspapers. When Father Flannery brought the idea to Bishop McVinney, the bishop was a little skeptical. He agreed to allow the introduction of the column when Father Flannery assured him that if there was any questionable letter, he would certainly show it to the bishop first. One of Father Flannery's primary interests was Catholic-Jewish relations. In 1954, prior to his appointment to the Visitor, he accepted a position as assistant editor of The Bridge, the yearbook published by the Judeo-Christian Institute at Seton Hall University in New Jersey. While editor of the Visitor, he researched and published a book on the history of Catholic prejudice against the Jews, which was published in 1964 under the title, "The Anguish of the Jews: Twenty-three Centuries of Anti-Semitism. Father Flannery's interest in Catholic-Jewish relations was reflected also in the many articles he wrote on the subject for the Visitor. Among the biggest news stories covered by the Visitor during Father Flannery's tenure as editor was the Second Vatican Council. Besides articles supplied by the NCWC News Service, Father Flannery also engaged four correspondents in Rome to provide the paper with weekly or special columns.
...
Years later, in an interview with another editor of the Visitor, Father Flannery offered his own appreciation of his work as editor. "We served as an agent that tried to favor change, to move from a static to a dynamic view of Catholicism. But we would never allow the secular culture to infiltrate the church. There needed to be a certain balance between the old and the new." For the most part, Father Flannery had the support of Bishop McVinney.
...
When the Visitor ran an obituary of Pope John XXIII taken from the Religious News Service, Bishop McVinney, then in Rome for the council, found it too liberal for his taste and immediately notified Father Flannery to cancel the paper's subscription to the service.
...
During his first years at the Visitor, Father Flannery labored without the assistance of another priest.
...
When, in December 1966, the Visitor announced that Father Edward H. Flannery would, on Feb. 1, 1967, accept newly-created positions with the Institute for Judeo-Christian Studies at Seton Hall University and with the Secretariat on Catholic-Jewish Affairs of the American bishops' Commission on Ecumenical and Inter-religious Affairs, it also announced that Father John F. Ferry, Father Flannery's assistant editor, would succeed him as editor.
...
When, in December 1966, the Visitor announced that Father Edward H. Flannery would, on Feb. 1, 1967, accept newly-created positions with the Institute for Judeo-Christian Studies at Seton Hall University and with the Secretariat on Catholic-Jewish Affairs of the American bishops' Commission on Ecumenical and Inter-religious Affairs, it also announced that Father John F. Ferry, Father Flannery's assistant editor, would succeed him as editor.
...
Plans for a Visitor building had been included in the Cathedral Square redevelopment plan before Father Flannery left. However, he had proposed to Bishop McVinney that the paper close its print shop, having found personally the difficulty in dealing with the printers' union. Furthermore, he pointed out, pastors were no longer taking their printing business to the Visitor, but to less expensive and more convenient print shops.
...
The Visitor, which under Father Flannery had carried news of diocesan groups picketing in support of a grape boycott called by Cesar Chavez's United Farmworkers Union, found itself being picketed.
In July 1955, Bishop McVinney assigned ...
www.providencevisitor.com, 1 Jan 2000 [cached]
In July 1955, Bishop McVinney assigned Father Edward H. Flannery to serve as Father Bracq's assistant editor.
...
During these years, Fathers Bracq and Flannery headed a staff of about 30.
...
A year later, in September 1957, after Father Bracq had suffered a heart attack, the bishop lightened his responsibilities by appointing the paper's assistant editor, Father Edward H. Flannery, his successor as editor and manager of the paper.
...
Father Flannery was ordained in May 1937, and had served, after a short summer assignment, as an assistant pastor in the Cathedral of SS.
...
Father Flannery later arranged for Father Keller to speak to the First Friday Club.
...
Beginning in 1950, Father Flannery traveled to New York on Monday and back to St. Joseph's on Friday, a trip he made each week for five years.When in 1955, having read a book review that Father Flannery had written and which was printed on the front page of the Visitor, Bishop McVinney asked its writer if he would be interested in working for the paper.Father Flannery accepted the offer.With Father Flannery's appointment, the Visitor once again had a socially conscious editor.Upon taking charge at the paper, Father Flannery proceeded to "spruce it up a bit."In his view, the paper looked the same each week.Among his innovations was the running of articles written by non-Catholics and supplied by the Religious News Service.Along the same lines, he believed that the paper had become too narrowly focused on Catholic issues alone.In order to widen the Visitor's concerns to include those of the state as a whole, he introduced a column entitled, "What's Right with Rhode Island," which was written by prominent Rhode Islanders, Catholics as well as non-Catholics, and which provided an opportunity to focus on the good things going on in the state.To Father Flannery, one aspect of the state that was not right was in the area of housing discrimination.After Father Anthony Robinson and other concerned citizens formed Citizens United for a Fair Housing Law in Rhode Island in 1958, Father Flannery threw editorial support in the Visitor behind the effort, which also had the support of Bishop McVinney.
...
In 1960, the National Conference of Christians and Jews awarded Father Flannery and The Providence Visitor their National Brotherhood Award in the newspaper editorial and news category.In that same year, the Catholic Press Association recognized Father Flannery's editorial by honoring the paper with and award for "Best Campaign in Public Interest."In the fall of 1960, Father Flannery was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize "for distinguished editorial writing."It would not be until 1965 that proponents of the legislation were able to overcome the reservations of the Rhode Island's lawmakers and secure the passage of the legislation.Among the other changes Father Flannery introduced was the return of a "Letters to the Editor" column which his predecessors had abandoned, as had most Catholic newspapers.When Father Flannery brought the idea to Bishop McVinney, the bishop was a little skeptical.He agreed to allow the introduction of the column when Father Flannery assured him that if there was any questionable letter, he would certainly show it to the bishop first.One of Father Flannery's primary interests was Catholic-Jewish relations.In 1954, prior to his appointment to the Visitor, he accepted a position as assistant editor of The Bridge, the yearbook published by the Judeo-Christian Institute at Seton Hall University in New Jersey.While editor of the Visitor, he researched and published a book on the history of Catholic prejudice against the Jews, which was published in 1964 under the title, "The Anguish of the Jews: Twenty-three Centuries of Anti-Semitism."Father Flannery's interest in Catholic-Jewish relations was reflected also in the many articles he wrote on the subject for the Visitor. Among the biggest news stories covered by the Visitor during Father Flannery's tenure as editor was the Second Vatican Council.Besides articles supplied by the NCWC News Service, Father Flannery also engaged four correspondents in Rome to provide the paper with weekly or special columns.
...
Years later, in an interview with another editor of the Visitor, Father Flannery offered his own appreciation of his work as editor."We served as an agent that tried to favor change, to move from a static to a dynamic view of Catholicism.But we would never allow the secular culture to infiltrate the church.There needed to be a certain balance between the old and the new." For the most part, Father Flannery had the support of Bishop McVinney.
...
When the Visitor ran an obituary of Pope John XXIII taken from the Religious News Service, Bishop McVinney, then in Rome for the council, found it too liberal for his taste and immediately notified Father Flannery to cancel the paper's subscription to the service.
...
During his first years at the Visitor, Father Flannery labored without the assistance of another priest.
...
When, in December 1966, the Visitor announced that Father Edward H. Flannery would, on Feb. 1, 1967, accept newly-created positions with the Institute for Judeo-Christian Studies at Seton Hall University and with the Secretariat on Catholic-Jewish Affairs of the American bishops' Commission on Ecumenical and Inter-religious Affairs, it also announced that Father John F. Ferry, Father Flannery's assistant editor, would succeed him as editor.
...
When, in December 1966, the Visitor announced that Father Edward H. Flannery would, on Feb. 1, 1967, accept newly-created positions with the Institute for Judeo-Christian Studies at Seton Hall University and with the Secretariat on Catholic-Jewish Affairs of the American bishops' Commission on Ecumenical and Inter-religious Affairs, it also announced that Father John F. Ferry, Father Flannery's assistant editor, would succeed him as editor.
...
Plans for a Visitor building had been included in the Cathedral Square redevelopment plan before Father Flannery left.However, he had proposed to Bishop McVinney that the paper close its print shop, having found personally the difficulty in dealing with the printers' union.Furthermore, he pointed out, pastors were no longer taking their printing business to the Visitor, but to less expensive and more convenient print shops.
...
The Visitor, which under Father Flannery had carried news of diocesan groups picketing in support of a grape boycott called by Cesar Chavez's United Farmworkers Union, found itself being picketed.
1875-2000 Celebrating 125 Years of Catholic Publishing
www.providencevisitor.com, 1 Jan 2000 [cached]
In July 1955, Bishop McVinney assigned Father Edward H. Flannery to serve as Father Bracq's assistant editor.
...
During these years, Fathers Bracq and Flannery headed a staff of about 30.
...
A year later, in September 1957, after Father Bracq had suffered a heart attack, the bishop lightened his responsibilities by appointing the paper's assistant editor, Father Edward H. Flannery, his successor as editor and manager of the paper.
...
Father Flannery was ordained in May 1937, and had served, after a short summer assignment, as an assistant pastor in the Cathedral of SS.Peter and Paul in Providence and then at St. Joseph's, Pawtucket.Like many priests ordained in the 1930s, he had an interest in social ministry or Catholic Action as it was then called.In 1941, he helped organize the Catholic Laymen's First Friday Club, which brought Catholics together to hear speakers and to discuss their faith, and served as its moderator until 1949.From 1946-49, he was also associated with the diocese's Social Action Institute which organized Labor Schools for labor and management.While attending a summer institute at Fordham University in New York in 1948, he met Father James A. Keller, a Maryknoll priest who had founded the Christophers three years earlier.Father Flannery later arranged for Father Keller to speak to the First Friday Club.
...
Beginning in 1950, Father Flannery traveled to New York on Monday and back to St. Joseph's on Friday, a trip he made each week for five years.When in 1955, having read a book review that Father Flannery had written and which was printed on the front page of the Visitor, Bishop McVinney asked its writer if he would be interested in working for the paper.Father Flannery accepted the offer.With Father Flannery's appointment, the Visitor once again had a socially conscious editor.Upon taking charge at the paper, Father Flannery proceeded to "spruce it up a bit."In his view, the paper looked the same each week.Among his innovations was the running of articles written by non-Catholics and supplied by the Religious News Service.Along the same lines, he believed that the paper had become too narrowly focused on Catholic issues alone.In order to widen the Visitor's concerns to include those of the state as a whole, he introduced a column entitled, "What's Right with Rhode Island," which was written by prominent Rhode Islanders, Catholics as well as non-Catholics, and which provided an opportunity to focus on the good things going on in the state.To Father Flannery, one aspect of the state that was not right was in the area of housing discrimination.After Father Anthony Robinson and other concerned citizens formed Citizens United for a Fair Housing Law in Rhode Island in 1958, Father Flannery threw editorial support in the Visitor behind the effort, which also had the support of Bishop McVinney.
...
In 1960, the National Conference of Christians and Jews awarded Father Flannery and The Providence Visitor their National Brotherhood Award in the newspaper editorial and news category.In that same year, the Catholic Press Association recognized Father Flannery's editorial by honoring the paper with and award for "Best Campaign in Public Interest."In the fall of 1960, Father Flannery was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize "for distinguished editorial writing."It would not be until 1965 that proponents of the legislation were able to overcome the reservations of the Rhode Island's lawmakers and secure the passage of the legislation.Among the other changes Father Flannery introduced was the return of a "Letters to the Editor" column which his predecessors had abandoned, as had most Catholic newspapers.When Father Flannery brought the idea to Bishop McVinney, the bishop was a little skeptical.He agreed to allow the introduction of the column when Father Flannery assured him that if there was any questionable letter, he would certainly show it to the bishop first.One of Father Flannery's primary interests was Catholic-Jewish relations.In 1954, prior to his appointment to the Visitor, he accepted a position as assistant editor of The Bridge, the yearbook published by the Judeo-Christian Institute at Seton Hall University in New Jersey.While editor of the Visitor, he researched and published a book on the history of Catholic prejudice against the Jews, which was published in 1964 under the title, "The Anguish of the Jews: Twenty-three Centuries of Anti-Semitism."Father Flannery's interest in Catholic-Jewish relations was reflected also in the many articles he wrote on the subject for the Visitor. Among the biggest news stories covered by the Visitor during Father Flannery's tenure as editor was the Second Vatican Council.Besides articles supplied by the NCWC News Service, Father Flannery also engaged four correspondents in Rome to provide the paper with weekly or special columns.
...
Years later, in an interview with another editor of the Visitor, Father Flannery offered his own appreciation of his work as editor."We served as an agent that tried to favor change, to move from a static to a dynamic view of Catholicism.But we would never allow the secular culture to infiltrate the church.There needed to be a certain balance between the old and the new." For the most part, Father Flannery had the support of Bishop McVinney.However, the bishop did at times intervene in the management of the paper.When the Visitor ran an obituary of Pope John XXIII taken from the Religious News Service, Bishop McVinney, then in Rome for the council, found it too liberal for his taste and immediately notified Father Flannery to cancel the paper's subscription to the service. During his first years at the Visitor, Father Flannery labored without the assistance of another priest.
...
When, in December 1966, the Visitor announced that Father Edward H. Flannery would, on Feb. 1, 1967, accept newly-created positions with the Institute for Judeo-Christian Studies at Seton Hall University and with the Secretariat on Catholic-Jewish Affairs of the American bishops' Commission on Ecumenical and Inter-religious Affairs, it also announced that Father John F. Ferry, Father Flannery's assistant editor, would succeed him as editor.
...
When, in December 1966, the Visitor announced that Father Edward H. Flannery would, on Feb. 1, 1967, accept newly-created positions with the Institute for Judeo-Christian Studies at Seton Hall University and with the Secretariat on Catholic-Jewish Affairs of the American bishops' Commission on Ecumenical and Inter-religious Affairs, it also announced that Father John F. Ferry, Father Flannery's assistant editor, would succeed him as editor.
...
Plans for a Visitor building had been included in the Cathedral Square redevelopment plan before Father Flannery left.However, he had proposed to Bishop McVinney that the paper close its print shop, having found personally the difficulty in dealing with the printers' union.Furthermore, he pointed out, pastors were no longer taking their printing business to the Visitor, but to less expensive and more convenient print shops.
...
The Visitor, which under Father Flannery had carried news of diocesan groups picketing in support of a grape boycott called by Cesar Chavez's United Farmworkers Union, found itself being picketed.
1875-2000 Celebrating 125 Years of Catholic Publishing
www.providencevisitor.com, 1 Jan 2000 [cached]
Father Flannery's legacy: From static to dynamic
...
In July 1955, Bishop McVinney assigned Father Edward H. Flannery to serve as Father Bracq's assistant editor.
...
During these years, Fathers Bracq and Flannery headed a staff of about 30.
...
Father Flannery's legacy: From static to dynamic
...
A year later, in September 1957, after Father Bracq had suffered a heart attack, the bishop lightened his responsibilities by appointing the paper's assistant editor, Father Edward H. Flannery, his successor as editor and manager of the paper.
...
Father Flannery was ordained in May 1937, and had served, after a short summer assignment, as an assistant pastor in the Cathedral of SS.
...
Father Flannery later arranged for Father Keller to speak to the First Friday Club.
...
Beginning in 1950, Father Flannery traveled to New York on Monday and back to St. Joseph's on Friday, a trip he made each week for five years. When in 1955, having read a book review that Father Flannery had written and which was printed on the front page of the Visitor, Bishop McVinney asked its writer if he would be interested in working for the paper. Father Flannery accepted the offer. With Father Flannery's appointment, the Visitor once again had a socially conscious editor. Upon taking charge at the paper, Father Flannery proceeded to "spruce it up a bit. In his view, the paper looked the same each week. Among his innovations was the running of articles written by non-Catholics and supplied by the Religious News Service. Along the same lines, he believed that the paper had become too narrowly focused on Catholic issues alone. In order to widen the Visitor's concerns to include those of the state as a whole, he introduced a column entitled, "What's Right with Rhode Island," which was written by prominent Rhode Islanders, Catholics as well as non-Catholics, and which provided an opportunity to focus on the good things going on in the state. To Father Flannery, one aspect of the state that was not right was in the area of housing discrimination. After Father Anthony Robinson and other concerned citizens formed Citizens United for a Fair Housing Law in Rhode Island in 1958, Father Flannery threw editorial support in the Visitor behind the effort, which also had the support of Bishop McVinney.
...
In 1960, the National Conference of Christians and Jews awarded Father Flannery and The Providence Visitor their National Brotherhood Award in the newspaper editorial and news category. In that same year, the Catholic Press Association recognized Father Flannery's editorial by honoring the paper with and award for "Best Campaign in Public Interest. In the fall of 1960, Father Flannery was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize "for distinguished editorial writing. It would not be until 1965 that proponents of the legislation were able to overcome the reservations of the Rhode Island's lawmakers and secure the passage of the legislation. Among the other changes Father Flannery introduced was the return of a "Letters to the Editor" column which his predecessors had abandoned, as had most Catholic newspapers. When Father Flannery brought the idea to Bishop McVinney, the bishop was a little skeptical. He agreed to allow the introduction of the column when Father Flannery assured him that if there was any questionable letter, he would certainly show it to the bishop first. One of Father Flannery's primary interests was Catholic-Jewish relations. In 1954, prior to his appointment to the Visitor, he accepted a position as assistant editor of The Bridge, the yearbook published by the Judeo-Christian Institute at Seton Hall University in New Jersey. While editor of the Visitor, he researched and published a book on the history of Catholic prejudice against the Jews, which was published in 1964 under the title, "The Anguish of the Jews: Twenty-three Centuries of Anti-Semitism. Father Flannery's interest in Catholic-Jewish relations was reflected also in the many articles he wrote on the subject for the Visitor. Among the biggest news stories covered by the Visitor during Father Flannery's tenure as editor was the Second Vatican Council. Besides articles supplied by the NCWC News Service, Father Flannery also engaged four correspondents in Rome to provide the paper with weekly or special columns.
...
Years later, in an interview with another editor of the Visitor, Father Flannery offered his own appreciation of his work as editor. "We served as an agent that tried to favor change, to move from a static to a dynamic view of Catholicism. But we would never allow the secular culture to infiltrate the church. There needed to be a certain balance between the old and the new." For the most part, Father Flannery had the support of Bishop McVinney.
...
When the Visitor ran an obituary of Pope John XXIII taken from the Religious News Service, Bishop McVinney, then in Rome for the council, found it too liberal for his taste and immediately notified Father Flannery to cancel the paper's subscription to the service.
...
During his first years at the Visitor, Father Flannery labored without the assistance of another priest.
...
When, in December 1966, the Visitor announced that Father Edward H. Flannery would, on Feb. 1, 1967, accept newly-created positions with the Institute for Judeo-Christian Studies at Seton Hall University and with the Secretariat on Catholic-Jewish Affairs of the American bishops' Commission on Ecumenical and Inter-religious Affairs, it also announced that Father John F. Ferry, Father Flannery's assistant editor, would succeed him as editor.
...
When, in December 1966, the Visitor announced that Father Edward H. Flannery would, on Feb. 1, 1967, accept newly-created positions with the Institute for Judeo-Christian Studies at Seton Hall University and with the Secretariat on Catholic-Jewish Affairs of the American bishops' Commission on Ecumenical and Inter-religious Affairs, it also announced that Father John F. Ferry, Father Flannery's assistant editor, would succeed him as editor.
...
Plans for a Visitor building had been included in the Cathedral Square redevelopment plan before Father Flannery left. However, he had proposed to Bishop McVinney that the paper close its print shop, having found personally the difficulty in dealing with the printers' union. Furthermore, he pointed out, pastors were no longer taking their printing business to the Visitor, but to less expensive and more convenient print shops.
...
The Visitor, which under Father Flannery had carried news of diocesan groups picketing in support of a grape boycott called by Cesar Chavez's United Farmworkers Union, found itself being picketed.
New Page 0
www.warwickcatholic.com, 1 June 2004 [cached]
Father Edward Flannery, distinguished author and one-time editor of the Visitor, once lamented in conversation that so many churches were locked up every day of the week except for a few minutes before and after morning Mass.He recalled that as a youth he could stop into church anytime he wished - on the way to school, for Sunday & weekday devotions, for Saturday confessions, for assorted celebrations during the liturgical year, or whenever he just happened to be going by.The church was truly the center of neighborhood life, he observed, both spiritually and socially.The locked church was a sad commentary, he suggested, not only on neighborhood decline but more importantly on Catholic spirituality.
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