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Wrong Eddie Gottlieb?

Eddie Gottlieb

Nba's All-Time Winning Coache

Basketball Association of America

Basketball Association of America

Background Information

Affiliations

Member
Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame

Member
Basketball Hall of Fame

Owner and Manager and Coach
National Basketball Players Association

Education



South Philadelphia High School



University of Kansas

Web References (200 Total References)


After a stint in the Air ...

www.nba.com [cached]

After a stint in the Air Force during World War II, Pollack worked as a sports writer at the Evening Bulletin, kept stats at college doubleheaders and was hired by Eddie Gottlieb to join the Philadelphia Warriors and the BAA when it was founded in 1946.


The Jewish Virtual Library - Biographies

www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org [cached]

Eddie Gottlieb


Before professional basketball players ...

www.jewishexponent.com [cached]

Before professional basketball players squared off inside state-of-the art arenas, earned millions of dollars and had a wide-ranging fan base, Eddie Gottlieb was on a mission to raise the profile of the game in the American consciousness -- and then make it a success.

Taking on assorted roles, such as player, coach, owner and promoter, Gottlieb repositioned Philadelphia pro ball from the small auditoriums that housed his South Philadelphia Hebrew Association team in the 1920s and '30s to the large venues, where sizable crowds could watch Wilt Chamberlain and the Philadelphia Warriors in the 1950s.He even co-founded the Basketball Association of America, a precursor to the National Basketball Association.
Eddie Gottlieb (center) with Warriors assistant coach Cy Kaselman (left) and Howie Dallmar.
...
In the 1920s and '30s -- when Jews were not often accepted outside of their own neighborhoods -- Gottlieb and the SPHAS (a winning team made up entirely of Jews) helped give the community a sense of pride, according to a new biography.
...
With a SPHAS game drawing an almost entirely Jewish crowd, Gottlieb held dances right after many of the contests.While the parents of young Jewish girls normally forbade their daughters to go to dances, exceptions tended to be made if it was held after a SPHAS game.
A Real Character The author described Gottlieb as a "character," who once was so upset about losing a game with the SPHAS that he poured iodine on the back of his shirt.At a restaurant later that night, he removed his jacket and told team members, "You stabbed me in the back!"
When Gottlieb ran the show, basketball was hardly the streamlined business operation of today, with each team having a front office and a payroll department.In his day, Gottlieb paid players out of his own pocket.
...
Unlike the modern era of owners who are millionaires or even billionaires, Gottlieb did not have much money to get his various business ventures off the ground.He relied instead on being frugal and making sound financial decisions, like accounting for every dollar and knowing the attendance at every game, according to the book.
...
Gottlieb first made big money in 1963, when he sold the Warriors for $850,000 (he'd bought the team for $25,000).
The businessman also stretched his influence into baseball, where he was the owner of the Philadelphia Stars of the Negro League and served as a booking agent for amateur games.He even spent some time promoting pro wrestling.
Getting a glimpse inside Gottlieb's personal life proved more of a challenge because he never married, had no children and died in 1979, said Westcott.In writing the book, he relied heavily on researching news stories and interviewing former players, coaches and members of the media.
"He just didn't have time to get married," said Westcott, who noted that Gottlieb had a longtime girlfriend who lived in New York.
...
Gottlieb lobbied the league to introduce a rule change in the NBA draft that allowed teams to sign high school players from their particular areas.Since Chamberlain played for Overbrook High School, it allowed Gottlieb to eventually draft him onto the Warriors.
...
"For my money, he was the greatest player in basketball history -- and [Gottlieb] got 'em."
See more articles in: Cover Page


Before professional basketball players ...

www.jewishexponent.com [cached]

Before professional basketball players squared off inside state-of-the art arenas, earned millions of dollars and had a wide-ranging fan base, Eddie Gottlieb was on a mission to raise the profile of the game in the American consciousness -- and then make it a success.

Taking on assorted roles, such as player, coach, owner and promoter, Gottlieb repositioned Philadelphia pro ball from the small auditoriums that housed his South Philadelphia Hebrew Association team in the 1920s and '30s to the large venues, where sizable crowds could watch Wilt Chamberlain and the Philadelphia Warriors in the 1950s.He even co-founded the Basketball Association of America, a precursor to the National Basketball Association.
Eddie Gottlieb (center) with Warriors assistant coach Cy Kaselman (left) and Howie Dallmar.
...
In the 1920s and '30s -- when Jews were not often accepted outside of their own neighborhoods -- Gottlieb and the SPHAS (a winning team made up entirely of Jews) helped give the community a sense of pride, according to a new biography.
...
With a SPHAS game drawing an almost entirely Jewish crowd, Gottlieb held dances right after many of the contests.While the parents of young Jewish girls normally forbade their daughters to go to dances, exceptions tended to be made if it was held after a SPHAS game.
A Real Character The author described Gottlieb as a "character," who once was so upset about losing a game with the SPHAS that he poured iodine on the back of his shirt.At a restaurant later that night, he removed his jacket and told team members, "You stabbed me in the back!"
When Gottlieb ran the show, basketball was hardly the streamlined business operation of today, with each team having a front office and a payroll department.In his day, Gottlieb paid players out of his own pocket.
...
Unlike the modern era of owners who are millionaires or even billionaires, Gottlieb did not have much money to get his various business ventures off the ground.He relied instead on being frugal and making sound financial decisions, like accounting for every dollar and knowing the attendance at every game, according to the book.
...
Gottlieb first made big money in 1963, when he sold the Warriors for $850,000 (he'd bought the team for $25,000).
The businessman also stretched his influence into baseball, where he was the owner of the Philadelphia Stars of the Negro League and served as a booking agent for amateur games.He even spent some time promoting pro wrestling.
Getting a glimpse inside Gottlieb's personal life proved more of a challenge because he never married, had no children and died in 1979, said Westcott.In writing the book, he relied heavily on researching news stories and interviewing former players, coaches and members of the media.
"He just didn't have time to get married," said Westcott, who noted that Gottlieb had a longtime girlfriend who lived in New York.
...
Gottlieb lobbied the league to introduce a rule change in the NBA draft that allowed teams to sign high school players from their particular areas.Since Chamberlain played for Overbrook High School, it allowed Gottlieb to eventually draft him onto the Warriors.
...
"For my money, he was the greatest player in basketball history -- and [Gottlieb] got 'em."
See more articles in: Sports & Players


International Jewish Sports Hall of Fame - Basketball

www.jewishsports.net [cached]

EDWARD "EDDIE" GOTTLIEB.USA.Born: 9/15/l898, in Kiev, Ukraine.Died: 12/1979.

Eddie "The Mogul" Gottlieb was a founder of the National Basketball Association, and one of the innovative pioneers who promoted and held together pro basketball during its long and painful emerging decades.Gottlieb coached and managed the Philadelphia Warriors from l947 to 1955, piloting them to the Basketball Association of America's first league championship in 1947.Gottlieb was inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame in 1971.
In 1952, Gottlieb purchased full ownership of the Warriors from his partners for $25,000, to save professional basketball for the City of Philadelphia.The team won their first NBA title in 1956, He sold the franchise to San Francisco in 1962.
Prior to the BAA and NBA, Eddie was associated with the legendary Philadelphia SPHAs (South Philadelphia Hebrew Association)--first as a player in 1917, and subsequently as its coach and owner (he and two friends organized the SPHAs shortly after high school graduation (see SPHAs bio).He coached the SPHAs to 11 Eastern and American League championships, including American Basketball League (ABL) titles in l934, l936, 1937, 1940, 1941, 1943, and 1945.
Many of pro basketball's existing rules are attributable to Gottlieb.From l952, until his death in l979, he was the official schedule-maker for the NBA.
...
The SPHAs was organized as an amateur team by Eddie Gottlieb, Harry Passon and Hughie Black, shortly after their high school graduation.
...
With Gottlieb establishing the Philadelphia Warriors as his BAA franchise, his SPHAs continued with the minor league ABL and as a touring opponent of the Harlem Globetrotters.Gottlieb sold the team in 1950 to former SPHAs star Red Klotz, who changed the name of the Globetrotters regular opponents to the Washington Generals.

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