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This profile was last updated on 2/24/14  and contains information from public web pages and contributions from the ZoomInfo community.

Mr. Ed Newcomer

Wrong Ed Newcomer?

Special Agent and Deputy Resident...

Local Address: Torrance, California, United States
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
4401 North Fairfax Dr. Room 520
Arlington, Virginia 22203
United States

Company Description: The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with others to conserve, protect and enhance fish, wildlife, plants and their habitats for the...   more
Background

Employment History

Education

  • law degree
70 Total References
Web References
Up to the Minute Louisiana Fishing & Hunting News Stories
www.rodnreel.com, 14 Aug 2007 [cached]
It's true, said U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Special Agent Ed Newcomer, that the internet has made wildlife crime easier, and easier to hide. But it's also made it easier for wildlife law enforcement agents to pose as potential customers - and to catch people.
"What works for criminals also works for us," said Newcomer.
...
"That's the engine that really drives this train," said Newcomer.
The drive that pushes people to buy such things as bird-eating spiders, giant African scorpions, poisonous snakes, macabre furniture and other ornaments made from animal parts is, said Newcomer, as simple as the desire to want something that nobody else has. The buyers are frequently people in upper income levels who simply seem to be taken by a novelty of the moment. The crime is compounded when the new owners of live exotic creatures become bored - and decide to dump them in the wild. That has helped place Florida at the top of the list of states with invasive species. California, where Newcomer is based, has its share.
How much illegal wildlife is available on the internet? Newcomer said it's difficult to know; there is no authoritative, dependable research. But as someone who spends time chasing internet crime, he's confident the numbers run to the thousands.
Newcomer thrives on the challenge; he relishes telling the story about how he and his colleagues nabbed a man in Los Angeles not long ago who billed himself as "the world's most wanted butterfly smuggler. He sold Newcomer $14,000 worth of protected butterflies and would have sold him $300,000 worth, if Newcomer had had the cash. The smuggler is spending two years in a federal prison.
The agents' undercover work is as much a battle of wits as anything else; they must change their tactics often - to fit the changing tactics of the people they are after.
Newcomer, who earned a law degree before deciding he wanted to be a wildlife agent, isn't discouraged. "Everything I work for is incapable of dialing 9-1-1," said Newcomer.
It's true, said U.S. Fish and ...
www.huntersnotebook.com [cached]
It's true, said U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Special Agent Ed Newcomer, that the internet has made wildlife crime easier, and easier to hide. But it's also made it easier for wildlife law enforcement agents to pose as potential customers - and to catch people. "What works for criminals also works for us," said Newcomer.
...
"That's the engine that really drives this train," said Newcomer.
The drive that pushes people to buy such things as bird-eating spiders, giant African scorpions, poisonous snakes, macabre furniture and other ornaments made from animal parts is, said Newcomer, as simple as the desire to want something that nobody else has. The buyers are frequently people in upper income levels who simply seem to be taken by a novelty of the moment. The crime is compounded when the new owners of live exotic creatures become bored - and decide to dump them in the wild. That has helped place Florida at the top of the list of states with invasive species. California, where Newcomer is based, has its share.
How much illegal wildlife is available on the internet? Newcomer said it's difficult to know; there is no authoritative, dependable research. But as someone who spends time chasing internet crime, he's confident the numbers run to the thousands.
Newcomer thrives on the challenge; he relishes telling the story about how he and his colleagues nabbed a man in Los Angeles not long ago who billed himself as "the world's most wanted butterfly smuggler. He sold Newcomer $14,000 worth of protected butterflies and would have sold him $300,000 worth, if Newcomer had had the cash. The smuggler is spending two years in a federal prison.
The agents' undercover work is as much a battle of wits as anything else; they must change their tactics often - to fit the changing tactics of the people they are after.
Newcomer, who earned a law degree before deciding he wanted to be a wildlife agent, isn't discouraged. "Everything I work for is incapable of dialing 9-1-1," said Newcomer.
It's true, said U.S. Fish and ...
www.huntersnotebook.com [cached]
It's true, said U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Special Agent Ed Newcomer, that the internet has made wildlife crime easier, and easier to hide.But it's also made it easier for wildlife law enforcement agents to pose as potential customers - and to catch people."What works for criminals also works for us," said Newcomer.
...
"That's the engine that really drives this train," said Newcomer.
The drive that pushes people to buy such things as bird-eating spiders, giant African scorpions, poisonous snakes, macabre furniture and other ornaments made from animal parts is, said Newcomer, as simple as the desire to want something that nobody else has.The buyers are frequently people in upper income levels who simply seem to be taken by a novelty of the moment.The crime is compounded when the new owners of live exotic creatures become bored - and decide to dump them in the wild.That has helped place Florida at the top of the list of states with invasive species.California, where Newcomer is based, has its share.
How much illegal wildlife is available on the internet?Newcomer said it's difficult to know; there is no authoritative, dependable research.But as someone who spends time chasing internet crime, he's confident the numbers run to the thousands.
Newcomer thrives on the challenge; he relishes telling the story about how he and his colleagues nabbed a man in Los Angeles not long ago who billed himself as "the world's most wanted butterfly smuggler."He sold Newcomer $14,000 worth of protected butterflies and would have sold him $300,000 worth, if Newcomer had had the cash.The smuggler is spending two years in a federal prison.
The agents' undercover work is as much a battle of wits as anything else; they must change their tactics often - to fit the changing tactics of the people they are after.
Newcomer, who earned a law degree before deciding he wanted to be a wildlife agent, isn't discouraged."Everything I work for is incapable of dialing 9-1-1," said Newcomer.
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service ...
www.dailynexus.com, 2 Feb 2012 [cached]
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Special Agent Ed Newcomer said the organization relies on information from the community to solve these types of cases.
"What people often forget is that wildlife cannot call 911," Newcomer said. "So we really rely on people to tell us what is going on and what they observe - if they observe suspicious activity or if they see an injured pelican - to report that sort of thing."
Newcomer said it is difficult to determine the location of the attacks as pelicans are capable of swimming with injured wings.
LOS ANGELES (AP) - The smell ...
www.610cktb.com, 19 Aug 2007 [cached]
LOS ANGELES (AP) - The smell struck undercover agent Ed Newcomer as soon as he entered the small, sparse apartment.
...
Newcomer shuddered.But he smiled affably, the wide-eyed neophyte being inducted by the master.It was a role that Newcomer, a special agent with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, had been perfecting for two weeks.
...
Newcomer's tape recorder had accidentally shut off.His cellphone was broken.His backup agent was lost in traffic.If the backup couldn't make contact soon, he would call the police.
It was Newcomer's first undercover case.
He had won the trust of the world's most notorious butterfly smuggler, a man who made hundreds of thousands of dollars trading in endangered insects.He had been invited into the suspect's home.
Yet if he didn't leave in minutes his cover could be blown.
...
When an informant tipped off agents that Kojima would be attending the annual insect fair at Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History in May 2003, Newcomer was put on the case.
...
Newcomer is trim and athletic, with an easygoing manner.He had left behind his gun and his badge.He had assumed a false name.And he had honed his story: how, bored by the business he had inherited from his father, he was looking for a hobby that could also become an investment.
...
Newcomer wondered what the beetle looked like alive.
...
"Wow," Newcomer exclaimed."How much?"
$10,000 alive.
Is that legal?Newcomer asked.
...
Newcomer thanked Kojima profusely.
...
Into this world, Newcomer immersed himself.There are about 18,000 known species of butterfly.Newcomer started learning their names, their markings, the prices that rare ones bring.
At work Newcomer became known as "the butterfly agent."Undercover, he was becoming "Yoshi's friend."
...
Newcomer invented a father and girlfriends.
Kojima taught Newcomer the delicate art of moistening the wings of dead butterflies so they could be unfolded and pinned precisely to mounting boards.
...
Kojima suggested that the two men start an EBay account together: Kojima would provide the specimens and Newcomer would run the Internet side.
...
As part of the deal Kojima gave Newcomer a disc containing photographs of his entire collection.
...
Newcomer alerted U.S. Customs.Then he served subpoenas for Kojima's U.S. bank accounts.
-
Nearly four months passed and Newcomer was beginning to worry.
He had given Kojima a fake home address and a special cellphone number.He e-mailed.He called.Nothing.
Finally, he saw his chance.Trolling the chat rooms of insectnet.com, he noticed other dealers complaining about Kojima.Newcomer jumped in.He could vouch for "Yoshi," he wrote.He was working with him and could get anything from his collection.
Dealers contacted Newcomer immediately.Proudly, Newcomer e-mailed Kojima, telling him he'd found new customers and asking for specimens.
...
Eventually Newcomer decided to set up a decoy EBay account.He would use butterfly photographs from the disc Kojima had given him and rig auctions so that the specimens would go for exorbitant prices to other undercover officers.He would prove to Kojima, once and for all, that he was serious about making money in the butterfly business.
Once again the plan backfired.
Kojima wrote angry notes to Newcomer accusing him of stealing his photographs.
...
Next, the local game warden's office called and told Newcomer about a tip it had received from a Japanese insect dealer who mistakenly thought he was contacting Fish and Wildlife.
...
Newcomer pretended to have built up a trusted base of customers, including one who would pay top dollar for a Queen Alexandra.
...
Newcomer held his breath.
...
Using his web camera, Kojima would show specimens from Japan that Newcomer could purchase and sell to his customers.
...
A month later Newcomer found himself staring at a grainy image of Kojima on his computer screen.
...
Newcomer asked.
...
Newcomer had spent $14,997 on 42 butterflies in two months of Skype exchanges.He estimated the black market value of all the butterflies that Kojima had offered him at $294,000.
Newcomer had all the proof he needed.
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