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Earl P. Halliburton

Wrong Earl P. Halliburton?
 
Background

Employment History

  • Active Member
    The USA-Engage

Board Memberships and Affiliations

  • Active Member of USA
6 Total References
Web References
Cheney
www.sheeple.net [cached]
At the time, we did not know that while Cheney headed the company, Halliburton had done business with the notorious Yadana pipeline project in Burma - an environmentally damaging project on behalf of which, according to a U.S. federal court, egregious human rights abuses were committed, including murder, torture, rape, forced labor and forced relocation.
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Knowing that Halliburton had been active in USA-Engage, we decided to study them next, and shortly afterwards, Dick Cheney became a candidate for Vice President of the United States.
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Since his candidacy, others have focused on his mixed financial record as CEO of Halliburton, and his enormous retirement package.We were interested more in Halliburton as a player in geopolitics.What we found is that Dick Cheney and Halliburton have been stirring a toxic mixture of oil, politics and business.
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That Dick Cheney built up Halliburton and got rich cashing in on connections from a long political career is obvious.
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As did Halliburton.Their involvement with the Yadana pipeline, though not as intimate as Unocal's, is clear.At a time when the Burmese government routinely and brutally violated basic human rights, Halliburton worked for them in an unnecessary but profitable boondoggle that will help support the dictatorship for years, and profited from the misery of villagers targeted by the military.
This is the real face of "engagement" with Burma.And while it is an especially ugly case, it is not an isolated instance.Halliburton does business in many other controversial places, asserting that engagement helps bring American values and democracy.
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For Halliburton, "not thinking very much" about political instability, human rights or environmental protection has been a financially successful strategy.
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Halliburton provided services to two controversial gas pipelines in Burma, the Yadana and the Yetagun.
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Dresser was purchased by Halliburton that same year.
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Halliburton also had an office in Rangoon in 1990.
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Halliburton has been an active member of USA-Engage and its campaigns against almost all forms of sanctions.
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Halliburton is the world's largest diversified energy services, engineering, construction and maintenance company, with some $15 billion in revenue annually, 100,000 employees, and 7,000 customers in over 120 countries.
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Halliburton's overseas operations included controversial projects in Azerbaijan, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Libya, and Nigeria.
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Indonesia: Halliburton has extensive investments and contracts in Indonesia.One of its contracts was cancelled by the government during a purge of corruptly awarded contracts.
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Even with the Act in place, Halliburton has continued to operate in Iran.
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Libya: Before Cheney's arrival, Halliburton was deeply involved in Libya, earning $44.7 million there in 1993.After sanctions on Libya were imposed, earnings dropped to $12.4 million in 1994.Halliburton continued doing business in Libya throughout Cheney's tenure.One U.S.Congressman accused the company "of undermining American foreign policy to the full extent allowed by law."
Nigeria: Halliburton has been accused of complicity in the shooting of a protestor by Nigeria's Mobile Police Unit, playing a similar role to Shell and Chevron in the mobilization of this 'kill and go" unit to protect company property.
Dick Cheney has been a strong voice in preventing or eliminating federal laws that place limits on Halliburton's ability to do business in these countries.
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Halliburton is a major beneficiary of bilateral and multilateral government aid toward fossil fuel industry projects in developing countries and the former countries of the Soviet Union.The company is a contractor on projects that have been financed by $6 billion in government aid packages since 1992.These packages include loans, credit, guarantees, and insurance for fossil fuel projects for which Halliburton has supplied services and equipment.
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These figures are low, as they do not include loan packages to at least 13 countries which received Ex-Im Bank loans, and with which Halliburton was involved.
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Halliburton's public policy on Burma is that they "don't do business in Burma."But while the company may have no current direct investments in Burma, our research shows that Halliburton has had a number of business involvements in Burma, including participation in the notorious Yadana and Yetagun pipelines.
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EMC, part of Halliburton's Energy Services Group, is a 50-50 joint venture between Halliburton and Saipem of Italy.From July 1997 to October 1997, EMC installed the 36-inch diameter line using its pipelaying barges, Semac 1 (offshore) and Castoro 5 (onshore approach).
The route followed by Halliburton and Saipem was chosen by the Burmese government to minimize costs, even though it would bring the pipeline through politically sensitive areas inhabited by ethnic minorities in the Tenasserim region of Burma.Given the Burmese military's well-documented history of human rights violations and brutality, the western companies knew or should have known that human rights crimes would accompany Burmese troops into the pipeline region.In fact, there was ample evidence in the public domain that such violations were already occurring when Halliburton chose to lay a pipe for the project.
In 1998, the same year it was bought by Halliburton, a subsidiary of Dresser Industries called Bredero-Price (now known as Bredero-Shaw) manufactured coatings for the Yetagun pipeline, which parallels the Yadana pipeline.The manufacture of the coating took place in Malaysia sometime before October 1998.Halliburton started the process of buying Dresser in early 1998, and completed it in September of that year.Bredero-Shaw is a 50-50 joint venture of Halliburton and Shaw Industries (Canada).
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These simple facts do not do justice to the enormity of the violent abuses suffered by villagers in the Yadana pipeline region. (For detailed documentation of the horrors of the Yadana pipeline, see "Total Denial Continues," available from ERI.) For the purposes of this report, it is enough to say the likelihood that these abuses would occur, were occurring and would continue to occur were well known to observers of and companies operating in the region, and should have been obvious to Halliburton.
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Providing revenue the generals desperately need to stay in power and to finance their massive military buildup is the very essence of "engagement" with Burma, and Dick Cheney's Halliburton has been ready to engage.
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For example, the involvement of Unocal and Halliburton in the Yadana project did nothing to stop massive abuses on those projects themselves, let alone to reduce abuses or improve democracy in Burma generally.
Finally, as the Congressional Budget Office has reported, USA-Engage has exaggerated the economic impacts, while moral considerations are given no attention at all.
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As discussed in the following chapter, Halliburton has done business in Iraq.
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One theory had it that USA-Engage started as a front for Unocal, a company with even more than Halliburton at stake in the Burma sanctions debate.But Halliburton was active early on as well.
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Halliburton and its corporate allies have served on several government advisory panels that have pushed the Clinton Administration to back off on the use of sanctions.For example, in 1997, Halliburton and other corporate officials placed USA-Engage anti-sanctions rhetoric on President Clinton's desk through a quasi-governmental body called the President's Export Council (PEC).
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Much of his talk was manna for Halliburton and other members of USA-Engage.He opposed a pending Senate bill that would impose sanctions on China for weapons proliferation.
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But Halliburton and the other members of USA-Engage do not agree even with Eizenstat's argument for moral leadership.
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Halliburton was founded by Earl Halliburton in 1919, who cemented oil wells in Texas.It now provides a wide range of engineering services, technology, and equipment for oil and gas fields, platforms, pipelines, refineries, highways, and military operations.In Cheney's tenure, Halliburton's revenues rose from $5.7 billion in 1994 to $14.9 billion in 1999, fueled primarily by growth outside the United States.According to the company's 1999 annual report, it has more than 7,000 customers in over 120 countries.These customers include the world's largest oil producing companies and countries.Halliburton employs over 100,000 people.It calls itself "the world's largest diversified energy services, engineering, construction and maintenance company."
Most of Halliburton's operations fall under one of three core divisions.The Energy Services Group, the Dresser Equipment Group, and the Engineering and Construction Group.
The Energy Services Group incl
Whiz AM FM TV
www.whizamfmtv.com, 14 April 2002 [cached]
"We don't do business in Burma, claims Halliburton spokesperson Wendy Hall.But while the company may have no current direct investments in | Burma, it has participated in a number of energy development projects there, including the notorious Yadana and Yetagun pipelines.
Natural gas deposits, later named the Yadana field, were first discovered offshore near Burma in the Andaman Sea in 1982.Beginning in the late 1980s, the Burmese government sought investors for a pipeline planned from the Yadana field across Burma to Thailand.
In 1991, the government reached a preliminary agreement, formalized later, to deliver gas to the Petroleum Authority of Thailand (PTT).
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Halliburton failed to respond to repeated requests for comment on these allegations and other issues raised in this article.Shortly before the election, Dick Cheney admitted on the Larry King Live! show that Halliburton had done contract work in Burma.
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Cheney defended the project by saying that Halliburton had not broken the U.S. law imposing sanctions on Burma, which forbids new investments in the country.
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Halliburton had an office in Rangoon as early as 1990, two years after the military regime took power by voiding the election of the National League for Democracy, the party of Aung San Suu Kyi.
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In 1997, after Dick Cheney joined Halliburton, the Yadana field developers hired European Marine Services (EMC) to lay the 365-kilometer offshore portion of the Yadana gas pipeline.
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EMC is a 50-50 joint venture between Halliburton and Saipem of Italy.From July to October 1997, EMC installed the 360-inch diameter line using its pipe-laying barges.
The route followed by Halliburton and Saipem was chosen by the Burmese government to minimize costs, even though the onshore pipeline path would cut through politically sensitive areas inhabited by ethnic minorities in the Tenasserim region of Burma.Given the Burmese military's well-documented history of human rights violations and brutality, human rights groups say the western companies knew or should have known that human rights crimes would accompany Burmese troops into the onshore pipeline region.They say there was ample evidence in the public domain that such violations were already occurring when Halliburton chose to lay pipe for the project.
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Dresser was purchased by Halliburton that same year.)For years, ERI has worked to document an extensive pattern of forced relocation and forced labor associated with the Yadana pipeline.Earthrights International has used the evidence mounted to build its legal case against the western multinationals involved.Halliburton, which only worked on the offshore portion of the pipeline, is not a defendant in the case.
ERI believes a consistent pattern of human rights and economic rights violations in the pipeline region are a predictable and direct result of the investments made by western multinationals.
In August 2000, a U.S. federal district court concluded that the Yadana pipeline consortium "knew the military had a record of committing human rights abuses; that the Project hired the military to provide security for the project, a military that forced villagers to work and entire villages to relocate for the benefit of the Project; that the military, while forcing villagers to work and relocate, committed numerous acts of violence; and that Unocal knew or should have known that the military did commit, was committing and would continue to commit these tortious acts."
Although the judge eventually dismissed the case-Doe et. al. v. Unocal et. al.-because, in his opinion, Unocal did not control the Burmese military, which committed the abuses, the case is being appealed. (ERI is co-counsel m the case. )
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Founded by Earl Halliburton in Texas in 1919, Halliburton now provides a wide range of engineering services, technology and equipment for oil and gas fields, platforms, pipelines, refineries, highways and military operations around the world.In the Cheney years, the company's revenues rose from $5.7 billion in 1994 to $14.9 billion in 1999, fueled primarily by growth outside the United States.During Cheney's tenure as CEO, Halliburton's overseas operations went from 51 percent of revenue to 68 percent of revenue.
"You've got to go where the oil is.
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Halliburton is now the world's largest diversified energy services, engineering, construction and maintenance company, with some 100,000 employees and 7,000 customers in more than 120 countries.
While most of Halliburton's revenues come from contracted oil and gas industry services, it also earns considerable income from major civil and military projects, such as building roads and deploying infrastructure for overseas U.S. operations.Halliburton ranked as the seventeenth leading recipient of U.S. defense contracts in 1999.Halliburton's Kellogg, Brown & Root subsidiary brought in all but $1 million of Halliburton's $657.5 million military loot.
GOING WHERE THE OIL ISBurma is not the only country in which engagement by Halliburton has been controversial.
During Cheney's tenure, Halliburton created or continued partnerships with some of the world's most notorious governments-in countries such as Azerbaijan, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Libya and Nigeria.
In order to do business with dictators and despots, Halliburton has skirted U.S. sanctions and made considerable efforts to eliminate those sanctions.
...
Halliburton had extensive investments and contracts in Suharto's Indonesia.One of its contracts was canceled by the post-Suharto government during a purging of corruptly awarded contracts.Indonesia Corruption Watch named Kellogg Brown & Root (Halliburton's engineering division) among 59 companies using collusive, corruptive and nepotistic practices in deals involving former President Suharto's family.
* Iran.
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Even with the Act in place, Halliburton has continued to operate in Iran.
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In July 2000, the International Herald Tribune reported, "Dresser-Rand and Ingersoll-Dresser Pump Co., joint ventures that Halliburton has sold within the past year, have done work in Iraq on contracts for the reconstruction of Iraq's oil industry, under the United Nations' Oil for Food Program."A Halliburton spokesman acknowledged to the Tribune that the Dresser subsidiaries did sell oil-pumping equipment to Iraq via European agents.
* Libya.Before Cheney's arrival, Halliburton was deeply involved in Libya, earning $44.7 million there in 1993.After sanctions on Libya were imposed, earnings dropped to $12.4 million in 1994.Halliburton continued doing business in Libya throughout Cheney's tenure.One Member of Congress accused the company "of undermining American foreign policy to the full extent allowed by law."
* Nigeria.Local villagers have accused Halliburton of complicity in the shooting of a protester by Nigeria's Mobile Police Unit, playing a similar role to Shell and Chevron in the mobilization of this 'kill and go" unit to protect company property.
...
Dick Cheney's position on sanctions has been virtually identical to that of USA*Engage, and Halliburton has been an active member of USA*Engage and its campaigns against almost all forms of sanctions.
...
Similarly, Cheney has opposed sanctions against almost all the countries that Halliburton does business in, including Iran, Libya and Azerbaijan.
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If USA*Engage is successful, Halliburton may resume dealings with the Burmese military dictatorship, a destructive engagement that could extend Burma's nightmare.
Dick Cheney's pro-engagement, anti-sanctions policies have remained consistent whether he is in government or business.These policies might be summarized as, "what's good for Halliburton is good for the world, and vice versa."It is one thing for the CEO of Halliburton to hold such a view.It is quite another for the Vice President of the United States.
Cheney & Halliburton: Go Where the Oil Is
hempfarm.org, 1 May 2001 [cached]
Moreover, the chuckling after this understated paean to private sector superiority helped to obscure the fact that Dick Cheney's Halliburton has succeeded by partnering or engaging with governments around the world-including some of the most repressive regimes in the world-and its complicity with egregious human rights violations.
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Halliburton failed to respond to repeated requests for comment on these allegations and other issues raised in this article.
Shortly before the election, Dick Cheney admitted on the Larry King Live! show that Halliburton had done contract work in Burma.
...
Cheney defended the project by saying that Halliburton had not broken the U.S. law imposing sanctions on Burma, which forbids new investments in the country.
...
Halliburton had an office in Rangoon as early as 1990, two years after the military regime took power by voiding the election of the National League for Democracy, the party of Aung San Suu Kyi.
...
In 1997, after Dick Cheney joined Halliburton, the Yadana field developers hired European Marine Services (EMC) to lay the 365-kilometer offshore portion of the Yadana gas pipeline.
...
EMC is a 50-50 joint venture between Halliburton and Saipem of Italy. From July to October 1997, EMC installed the 360-inch diameter line using its pipe-laying barges.
The route followed by Halliburton and Saipem was chosen by the Burmese government to minimize costs, even though the onshore pipeline path would cut through politically sensitive areas inhabited by ethnic minorities in the Tenasserim region of Burma. Given the Burmese military's well-documented history of human rights violations and brutality, human rights groups say the western companies knew or should have known that human rights crimes would accompany Burmese troops into the onshore pipeline region. They say there was ample evidence in the public domain that such violations were already occurring when Halliburton chose to lay pipe for the project.
...
Dresser was purchased by Halliburton that same year.)
For years, ERI has worked to document an extensive pattern of forced relocation and forced labor associated with the Yadana pipeline. Earthrights International has used the evidence mounted to build its legal case against the western multinationals involved. Halliburton, which only worked on the offshore portion of the pipeline, is not a defendant in the case.
...
Founded by Earl Halliburton in Texas in 1919, Halliburton now provides a wide range of engineering services, technology and equipment for oil and gas fields, platforms, pipelines, refineries, highways and military operations around the world.
...
Halliburton is now the world's largest diversified energy services, engineering, construction and maintenance company, with some 100,000 employees and 7,000 customers in more than 120 countries.
While most of Halliburton's revenues come from contracted oil and gas industry services, it also earns considerable income from major civil and military projects, such as building roads and deploying infrastructure for overseas U.S. operations. Halliburton ranked as the seventeenth leading recipient of U.S. defense contracts in 1999. Halliburton's Kellogg, Brown & Root subsidiary brought in all but $1 million of Halliburton's $657.5 million military loot.
GOING WHERE THE OIL IS
Burma is not the only country in which engagement by Halliburton has been controversial.
During Cheney's tenure, Halliburton created or continued partnerships with some of the world's most notorious governments-in countries such as Azerbaijan, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Libya and Nigeria.
In order to do business with dictators and despots, Halliburton has skirted U.S. sanctions and made considerable efforts to eliminate those sanctions.
...
Halliburton had extensive investments and contracts in Suharto's Indonesia. One of its contracts was canceled by the post-Suharto government during a purging of corruptly awarded contracts.
...
Even with the Act in place, Halliburton has continued to operate in Iran.
...
In July 2000, the International Herald Tribune reported, "Dresser-Rand and Ingersoll-Dresser Pump Co., joint ventures that Halliburton has sold within the past year, have done work in Iraq on contracts for the reconstruction of Iraq's oil industry, under the United Nations' Oil for Food Program. A Halliburton spokesman acknowledged to the Tribune that the Dresser subsidiaries did sell oil-pumping equipment to Iraq via European agents.
* Libya. Before Cheney's arrival, Halliburton was deeply involved in Libya, earning $44.7 million there in 1993. After sanctions on Libya were imposed, earnings dropped to $12.4 million in 1994. Halliburton continued doing business in Libya throughout Cheney's tenure. One Member of Congress accused the company "of undermining American foreign policy to the full extent allowed by law."
* Nigeria. Local villagers have accused Halliburton of complicity in the shooting of a protester by Nigeria's Mobile Police Unit, playing a similar role to Shell and Chevron in the mobilization of this 'kill and go" unit to protect company property.
Dick Cheney has been a strong advocate for preventing or eliminating federal laws that place limits on Halliburton's ability to do business in these countries.
...
Dick Cheney's position on sanctions has been virtually identical to that of USA*Engage, and Halliburton has been an active member of USA*Engage and its campaigns against almost all forms of sanctions.
...
Similarly, Cheney has opposed sanctions against almost all the countries that Halliburton does business in, including Iran, Libya and Azerbaijan.
...
If USA*Engage is successful, Halliburton may resume dealings with the Burmese military dictatorship, a destructive engagement that could extend Burma's nightmare.
...
These policies might be summarized as, "what's good for Halliburton is good for the world, and vice versa."
It is one thing for the CEO of Halliburton to hold such a view.
...
This article is based on "Halliburton's Destructive Engagement: How Dick Cheney and USA Engage Subvert Democracy at Home and Abroad, " a report by EarthRights International.
The fight between BP, Transocean, and ...
www.ritholtz.com, 25 Oct 2010 [cached]
The fight between BP, Transocean, and Halliburton is not resolved. Each is trying to blame the other and avoid paying a share of the damages. The FT noted the irony that Halliburton is a “cutting-edge technology†company, yet it is the allegation of negligence regarding HAL cement that may trigger the damage claim. Oil well cement, notes the FT, “… is how Earl Halliburton, its founder, got started 80 years ago.â€
Honors oil industry giant, Earl P. ...
www.travelok.com, 19 Dec 2001 [cached]
Honors oil industry giant, Earl P. Halliburton, founder of Halliburton Services, and international oil service company that began in Duncan and More>>
Heroes Plaza - El Reno
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