Need more? Try out  Advanced Search (20+ criteria)»

Last Update

is this you? Claim your profile.

Wrong Dwight Aakre?

Dwight G. Aakre

Extension Service Farm Management Specialist

North Dakota State University

HQ Phone:  (701) 231-8011

Direct Phone: (701) ***-****direct phone

GET ZOOMINFO GROW

+ Get 10 Free Contacts a Month

Please agree to the terms and conditions.

I agree to the  Terms of Service and  Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Grow at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

THANK YOU FOR DOWNLOADING!

computers
  • 1.Download
    ZoomInfo Grow
    v sign
  • 2.Run Installation
    Wizard
  • 3.Check your inbox to
    Sign in to ZoomInfo Grow

I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

North Dakota State University

P.O. Box 6050

Fargo, North Dakota,58108

United States

Company Description

NDSU, Fargo, North Dakota, USA, is notably listed among the top 108 U.S. public and private universities in the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education's category of "Research Universities/Very High Research Activity. NDSU is listed in the top 100 research uni... more.

Find other employees at this company (8,679)

Web References(197 Total References)


www.minotdailynews.com

"Total direct losses are estimated at $36.2 million due to reduced sales of crop production as a result of inundated acres," said Dwight Aakre, North Dakota State University Extension Service farm management specialist.


feedlotmagazine.com

* Dwight Aakre, NDSU Extension farm management specialist - He will explain how


www.producer.com

In the 1980s, farmers cut production after prices dropped and put land into the government's new Conservation Reserve Program (CRP), which pays farmers to let fields sit fallow to benefit the environment, said Dwight Aakre, a farm management specialist for North Dakota State University's Extension Service, which offers advice to the public.
Aakre said plantings should shrink to help prices eventually recover. However, farmers focus on keeping their operations afloat this year, instead of tightening global supplies. "The industry needs to contract, but if the farmer contracts he makes (his) situation worse," he said.


www.farmerscoopassn.com

"When operating margins are strong, as was the situation for several years prior to 2013, this concern seldom came to mind," says Dwight Aakre, North Dakota State University Extension Service farm management specialist.
"There were adequate returns to cover rising costs and minor yield reductions because commodity prices were strong and still rising." Since grain prices peaked in 2012, the price for wheat and soybeans has declined by 40 percent and the price of corn has been cut in half. At the same time, costs have declined very little. "Thus, most farm operators are struggling with the cost price squeeze and are looking for ways to deal with it," Aakre says. "Yield will always be the primary determinant of profitability," Aakre says. "Certainly direct costs, market price and land rent impact profitability as well, but this analysis suggests that all of these factors together do not equal the impact that yield has on the bottom line. "The economic environment faced by farmers in 2016 makes it imperative that any plans to reduce costs must first be evaluated on whether or not they will impact yield," Aakre says. "You cannot afford to lose yield in 2016. This year will be a cash flow challenge for many producers, but don't make it worse by making short-sighted decisions on yield-enhancing inputs." Aakre adds, "Most difficult financial situations arise from taking on too much term debt on land and machinery. These obligations are incurred during good times and are feasible as long as those conditions last. But when markets turn down, there is considerably less cash flow to service this debt load." Source: Dwight Aakre and Kelli Armbruster, North Dakota State University


feedlotmagazine.com

* Dwight Aakre, NDSU Extension farm management specialist - He will explain how


Similar Profiles

city

Browse ZoomInfo's Business
Contact Directory by City

city

Browse ZoomInfo's
Business People Directory

city

Browse ZoomInfo's
Advanced Company Directory