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This profile was last updated on 1/18/15  and contains information from public web pages and contributions from the ZoomInfo community.

Dr. Duane Russell Hospenthal

Wrong Dr. Duane Russell Hospenthal?

Adjunct Professor of Medicine

University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
Phone: (210) ***-****  HQ Phone
Email: d***@***.edu
University of Texas Health Science Center
7703 Floyd Curl Drive Mail Code 7776
San Antonio , Texas 78229
United States

Company Description: The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio is the leading research institution in South Texas and one of the major health sciences universities in...   more
Background

Employment History

Board Memberships and Affiliations

Education

  • MD
  • PhD
22 Total References
Web References
Past President: Duane Russell ...
www.texasidsociety.org, 18 Jan 2015 [cached]
Past President: Duane Russell Hospenthal, MD, PhD, FACP, FIDSA
Dr. Hospenthal is an infectious disease physician currently practicing in San Antonio, Texas. He is an Adjunct Professor of Medicine at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio and serves as a member of the Executive Committee of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) Emerging Infections Network. Originally from Benzonia, Michigan, Dr. Hospenthal earned his undergraduate, graduate and medical degrees from Michigan State University, and completed his postgraduate training (Internal Medicine and Infectious Disease) at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, DC. He served in the US Army from 1984-2012, with assignments at the 121st General Hospital in Seoul, South Korea, Tripler Army Medical Center, Hononlulu, Hawaii, and Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas. He has served as the Infectious Disease Consultant to the US Army Surgeon General (2005-2011) and as the Department of Defense representative to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Office of Infectious Diseases Board of Scientific Counselors (CDC OID BSC, 2004-2012). Dr. Hospenthal has also served as a member of the IDSA State and Regional Societies Board (2004-2007) and Standards and Practices Guidelines Committee (2007-2010). In addition to serving as President of the Texas Infectious Disease Society (2008-2010), he has served as Secretary-Treasurer, Vice President, and President of the Armed Forces Infectious Disease Society. Dr. Hospenthal has over 250 publications and has served as editor of his own textbook ( Diagnosis and Treatment of Human Mycoses) and four journal supplements. His recent work has focused on response to multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria and invasive fungal infections of combat-injured US military personnel. In addition to published research and infection prevention and control efforts in the combat zone, Dr. Hospenthal has led efforts to produce IDSA endorsed prevention guidelines on this subject.
Texas Infectious Diseases Society
www.texasidsociety.org, 27 Jan 2012 [cached]
Past President: Duane Russell Hospenthal, MD, PhD
Dr. (Colonel) Hospenthal currently serves as the Infectious Disease Consultant to the US Army Surgeon General, and Chief of the Infectious Disease Service at Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas. He currently holds academic appointments at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (Professor of Medicine), and the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (Clinical Professor of Medicine). Dr. Hospenthal earned his undergraduate, graduate and medical degrees from Michigan State University, and completed his postgraduate training (internal medicine and infectious diseases) at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, DC. He has served in the US Army since 1984, with previous assignments at the 121st General Hospital in Seoul, South Korea (Chief, Internal Medicine, 1994-1995) and Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, Hawaii (Assistant Chief, Infectious Disease, 1998-2001). COL Hospenthal is the clinical champion for the Infectious Disease Theater (deployment) Teleconsultation Service and also currently serves as the Department of Defense representative to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Coordinating Center for Infectious Diseases Board of Scientific Counselors (CDC CCID BSC, 2004- ). He is a current member of the Standards and Practice Guidelines Committee (2007-2010) and a past member of the State and Regional Societies Board (2004-2007) of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA). He has served as Secretary-Treasurer, Vice President, and President of the Armed Forces Infectious Diseases Society (AFIDS, 2001-2004) and currently serves as its webmaster (www.afids.org, 1997- ) and Army Councilor (2005- ). Dr. Hospenthal has nearly 200 publications and has served as editor of his own textbook (Diagnosis and Treatment of Human Mycoses) and several journal supplements.
Duane R. Hospenthal, COL, ...
afids.org, 13 July 2011 [cached]
Duane R. Hospenthal, COL, MC, USA [Army]
...
Duane R. Hospenthal, COL, MC, USA
...
Duane R. Hospenthal, COL, MC, USA - 2003-2004
...
Duane R. Hospenthal, COL, MC, USA
RecruitMilitary.com - The Henry M. Jackson Foundation
www.militaryheadhunter.com, 11 Feb 2005 [cached]
Duane Hospenthal, Chief of the Infectious Disease Service at Brooke Army Medical Center, is engaged in a wide range of research endeavors, including the study of leptospirosis and projects related to fungal infections.
Military Winning Iraqibacter Battle But War on Resistant Organisms Continues
www.usmedicine.com, 27 June 2013 [cached]
Duane R. Hospenthal, MD, PhD, an infectious-disease physician at Brooke Army Medical Center in Texas. Furthermore, despite the hype, he said that essentially no military deaths can be directly attributed to Acinetobacter infection.
...
Hospenthal, who served as an infectious-disease consultant to the Army Surgeon General from 2005-2011, told U.S. Medicine that one contributor to the problem is the multitude of transmission opportunities created when wounded warriors are transferred thousands of miles from one treatment location to another.
"These folks are handed off by hundreds of people. They may be transported 6,000 to 8,500 miles within days of being wounded," Hospenthal noted. "It's not like someone who is hit on the freeway and brought to the nearest trauma center and gets all of his treatment there."
Acinetobacter baumannii, found in soil and water and even on the skin and in the guts of healthy people, can bespread by person-to-person contact or contact with contaminated surfaces, according to the CDC. Patients with compromised immune systems are most susceptible to infection. Long flights, multiple airport landings and being moved from stretcher to ambulance to helicopter mean "lots of opportunity for cross-contamination," Hospenthal added.
The wounded servicemembers, who often suffer polytrauma, tend to see numerous physicians during the transport. While the old trauma practice was to clean out a wound, debride it, pack it and not look at it for two or three days, physicians at far-flung locations may "want to see what is wrong" when the patient arrives, he explained. "There's not one guy seeing the patient every day for the last three days."
Another issue cited by Hospenthal is the overuse of antibiotics, especially when resistant bacteria such as Acinetobacter were first identified in wounded troops.
Without adequate clinical-microbiology backup during the early years of Operation Iraqi Freedom, physicians had to use their best judgment on when and how to treat infections. If they saw that more pressure was required to ventilate a patient or that the wound had a greenish ooze, they often would "broaden antimicrobial empiric coverage," he noted. The lack of conclusive information led to "overuse and indiscriminate use of broad-spectrum agents," which tends to increase pathogens' antibiotic resistance.
In addition, especially in Iraq, "We kept a lot of host nationals in hospitals way too long because we had no place to send them because of sectarian violence," Hospenthal said.
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