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Wrong Douglas Christison?

Douglas B. Christison

Chief Executive Officer

Christison Company

HQ Phone:  (925) 371-5700

Direct Phone: (925) ***-****direct phone

Email: d***@***.com

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Christison Company

7901 Stoneridge Dr. Ste.222

Pleasanton, California,94588

United States

Company Description

Christison Company is a full service CID (Common Interest Development) management and consulting firm. Our office in Pleasanton, California has four in-house departments staffed with professionals specializing in areas of association operations and management....more

Web References(19 Total References)


FULLfocus™ HOA and Community Management Software — See FULLfocus™

seefullfocus.com [cached]

- Doug Christison, President, Christison Company


Individual HOA Board Members: Your Authority is Limited - Pavese

paveselaw.com [cached]

The manager who triggered the debate is Doug Christison, an industry veteran and president of the Christison Co., a community association management company in Pleasanton, Calif.
He starts by explaining the difference between administration and management of an association. "Those two words get mixed up often," claims Christison, who says the board is the association's administrator, and it hires a manager to handle the day-to-day management of the association. "The primary role of the board isn't the management of the association per se. It's not the day-to-day actions. It's for the oversight of people who are assigned or accountable by either some sort of a contract or agreement to do those actions." With that in mind, can an individual director act outside of the board? "The answer is yes, if the board says so," contends Christison. "The board can do pretty much what it sets up its rules to do. It's a written exercise, and that language becomes the guidance for the management to take and run with. "That often becomes where the problems arise because without an individual charter or authority somewhere written down, individuals tend to expand their scope of authority beyond what the other members intended," says Christison. "So for the board members to step in and start taking executive authority, like directing a landscaper, that's where, at least under California law, they've entered into dicey area. That's because, as directors, they then end up overseeing themselves. "Board members shouldn't even on an individual basis be delegated things the group is supposed to be in charge of," argues Christison. "That's really offensive to the directors who aren't there," says Christison. "In addition, often boards don't know their own policies. In those cases, they may be directing others to violate association policy." This Has Real Consequences Christison offers what he calls an extreme example of how this misuse of authority can play out. "A couple of years ago, after serving on the board for some time, a gentleman was elevated to be president," he recalls. "Through his individual aggression, he instructed the managing agent-me-not to communicate with any other board members. He would do things like direct the landscaper or contact a homeowner and say, 'I'm going to fine you.' Note the big 'I' in that situation. "He had read the governing documents in a way that was rather peculiar to empower himself in that way," explains Christison.


Christison Company | Builder & Developer Services| Association Management

www.christisoncompany.com [cached]

Christison Company Founder and President Doug Christison prepared the industries first Budget Preparation Guide for Condominium Associations in 1973 and worked with the California Department of Real Estate as a member of the Department's Subdivision Advisory Committee to establish many of the Commissioner's guidelines, which affect Common Interest Developments.


www.hoaleader.com

The manager who triggered the debate is Doug Christison, an industry veteran and president of the Christison Co., a community association management company in Pleasanton, Calif.
He starts by explaining the difference between administration and management of an association. "Those two words get mixed up often," claims Christison, who says the board is the association's administrator, and it hires a manager to handle the day-to-day management of the association. "The primary role of the board isn't the management of the association per se. It's not the day-to-day actions. It's for the oversight of people who are assigned or accountable by either some sort of a contract or agreement to do those actions." With that in mind, can an individual director act outside of the board? "The answer is yes, if the board says so," contends Christison. "The board can do pretty much what it sets up its rules to do. It's a written exercise, and that language becomes the guidance for the management to take and run with. "That often becomes where the problems arise because without an individual charter or authority somewhere written down, individuals tend to expand their scope of authority beyond what the other members intended," says Christison.


California Association of Community Managers | Welcome

www.cacm.org [cached]

Doug Christison
Doug Christison, CCAM, PCAM Christison Company


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