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Wrong Doug Broeska?

Doug Broeska

Chief Executive Officer

Regenetek-Cellular-Technologies-Inc.

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Background Information

Employment History

President

The CliniCard Inc


Contributor

Software Magazine


Affiliations

International Cellular Medicine Society

Member


Education

BSc

University of Manitoba


PhD

Brightland University


PhD

University of Manitoba


degree

philosophy

Brightland University


Web References(42 Total References)


www.winnipegfreepress.com

Broeska said he personally funded some of the study's startup costs.
A scan of Doug Broeska's degree in philosophy from Brightland University. Enlarge Image A scan of Doug Broeska's degree in philosophy from Brightland University. After days of silence, the Winnipeg medical researcher who charged multiple sclerosis patients thousands of dollars for overseas stem-cell treatment says he's been "unfairly accused and victimized by inaccurate media reporting" and looks forward to clearing his name. In a statement sent to local media Friday morning, Doug Broeska, owner of Regenetek Research, said media reports he falsified his credentials, overstated the effects of the stem-cell clinical trial, failed to follow up with patients and was recently removed from the study are false. He said he stands by his role in the "case-based study" where his job was to track patients for followup. He said he has not breached ethical standards and did not give medical advice to patients. 'Dr. Broeska regrets any misperception that may have resulted from referencing a PhD from the University of Manitoba on his LinkedIn page' Broeska also released a notarized copy of his PhD certificate from Brightland University, which is not accredited in Canada, the United States or the United Kingdom. Brightland's website includes no phone numbers, no names of senior administrators or location information, spells the school name incorrectly in one reference and is linked to a well-known degree mill operator. Broeska's degree certificate, notarized by Liya Akalu in Washington, D.C., includes a stamp saying the oath was sworn before her on Dec. 22, 2015, a date still nearly 11 months away. Broeska's spokesman, David MacKay of Winnipeg public relations firm ResultzPR, said the date was an error made by the notary, and Broeska is awaiting a correction. Broeska has so far refused to provide a copy of his dissertation, saying Friday releasing it is up to his lawyer. Broeska originally claimed to have a bachelor of science degree and a PhD from the University of Manitoba. Neither is true. "Dr. Broeska regrets any misperception that may have resulted from referencing a PhD from the University of Manitoba on his LinkedIn page," said the statement. "He did attend three years of classes at the University of Manitoba but did not receive a degree there." Broeska also said it's not uncommon to ask patients to pay for clinical trials, which are voluntary. And, he disputed word this week from Regenetek's Indian partner, Surjo Banerjee of Genesis Ltd., the firm had ended dealings with Regenetek. "The allegations against Dr. Broeska have not been proven, or even substantiated," said MacKay in an email. "Dr. Broeska has not received any indication from contacts in India that Genesis Ltd. is cutting ties with Regenetek Research." Broeska also said he personally funded some of the study's startup costs and reiterated Regenetek is a not-for-profit company. He said some patients had their treatment subsidized. "The bottom line is that Regenetek has never rejected a participant because they could not pay the full amount," said Broeska. "Clearly, if Regenetek was conducting medical tourism, it would not accept participants who could not pay their fee in full." Broeska said he is not aware of any RCMP investigation into Regenetek, or one by the Canada Revenue Agency. He said two people who have filed RCMP complaints about Regenetek "were not enrolled in the study and may have a competitive financial motive to try to diminish the company's achievements and tarnish its reputation."


www.winnipegfreepress.com

Doug Broeska
Enlarge Image Doug Broeska (LINKEDIN) In a statement sent to local media Friday morning, Doug Broeska, owner of Regenetek Research says media reports that he falsified his credentials, overstated the effects of the stem cell clinical trial, failed to follow up with patients and was recently asked to step down as the study's researcher are false. He said he stands by his role in the "case-based study" where his job was to track patients for follow-up. He said he has not breached ethical standards and did not give medical advice to patients. He also enclosed a notarized copy of his PhD certificate from Brightland University, which is not accredited in Canada, the United States or the United Kingdom. Brightland’s website includes no contact or location information, spells “Brightland� incorrectly and is linked to a well-known degree mill operator He also enclosed a notarized copy of his PhD certificate from Brightland University, which is not accredited in Canada, the United States or the United Kingdom. Brightland's website includes no contact or location information, spells "Brightland" incorrectly and is linked to a well-known degree mill operator. Broeska's degree certificate, notarized by Liya Akalu, a notary public in Washington, D.C., includes a stamp saying the oath was sworn before her Dec. 15, 2015, a date that has not yet occurred. Broeska originally claimed to have a BSc and a PhD from the University of Manitoba. Neither is true. "Dr. Broeska regrets any misperception that may have resulted from referencing a PhD from the University of Manitoba on his LinkedIn page," said the statement. "He did attend three years of classes at the University of Manitoba but did not receive a degree there." Broeska also said it's not uncommon to ask patients to pay for clinical trials, which are voluntary. "There is significant cost to conduct the research and administer the treatment and follow up especially since the research is being conducted at a hospital in Pune, in India," said Broeska. "The reason why India was selected is because it has enabling legislation that permits and supports this method of research. Canada and the U.S. do not have medical regulations that support private stem cell treatment trials. These are the reasons why Health Canada is not involved in overseeing this research." Broeska also said he personally funded some of the study's startup costs, and reiterated that Regenetek is a not-for-profit company. He said some patients had their treatment subsidized. "The bottom line is that Regenetek has never rejected a participant because they could not pay the full amount," said Broeska. "Clearly, if Regenetek was conducting medical tourism it would not accept participants who could not pay their fee in full." Broeska said he is not aware of any RCMP investigation into Regentek, or one by the Canada Revenue Agency. He said two people who have filed RCMP complaints about Regenetek "were not enrolled in the study and may have a competitive financial motive to try to diminish the company's achievements and tarnish its reputation." Statement from Doug Broeska Updated on Friday, January 23, 2015 at 10:57 AM CST: Adds statement from Broeska


www.winnipegfreepress.com

CHRIS BOLIN / for THE WINNIPEG FREE PRESS Lee Chuckry, who has MS, took part in a stem-cell trial run by Doug Broeska (left)and Regenetek Research. He quit taking a drug to receive the treatment in India. After returning home and failing to get answers, he eventually became one of Regenetek�s most vocal critics.
CHRIS BOLIN / for THE WINNIPEG FREE PRESS Lee Chuckry, who has MS, took part in a stem-cell trial run by Doug Broeska (left)and Regenetek Research. Doug Broeska, founder of Winnipeg-based Regenetek Research and the clinical trial's principal investigator, told Chuckry that Tysabri would damage the effectiveness of the implanted stem cells. Chuckry knew Broeska was not a physician, but believed Broeska had a PhD and was a bona fide health researcher. Chuckry spent 10 days trying to get in touch with Broeska to find out whether going back on his MS medication, this time a steroid called prednisone, would interfere with the effectiveness of his newly implanted stem cells. "Doug has made himself out to be some sort of god, and people have actually fallen for it," said Chuckry. In an email to the Free Press, Broeska said he never gave medical advice. "At no time has Regenetek represented that it was providing medical care during any portion of the clinical study," he wrote.


www.winnipegfreepress.com

Lee Chuckry, who has MS, took part in a stem-cell trial run by Doug Broeska and Regenetek Research. The Airdrie, Alta., man eventually became one of Regenetek's most vocal critics.
Lee Chuckry, who has MS, took part in a stem-cell trial run by Doug Broeska and Regenetek Research. A list of prohibited medications posted on Doug Broeska's blog on the Regenetek website: http://media.winnipegfreepress.com/documents/Listofmeds.pdf Doug Broeska, founder of Winnipeg-based Regenetek Research and the clinical trial's principal investigator, told Chuckry that Tysabri would damage the effectiveness of the implanted stem cells. Chuckry knew Broeska was not a physician, but believed Broeska had a PhD and was a bona fide health researcher. Chuckry spent 10 days trying to get in touch with Broeska to find out whether going back on his MS medication, this time a steroid called prednisone, would interfere with the effectiveness of his newly implanted stem cells. "Doug has made himself out to be some sort of god, and people have actually fallen for it," said Chuckry. In an email to the Free Press, Broeska said he never gave medical advice. "At no time has Regenetek represented that it was providing medical care during any portion of the clinical study," he wrote. Some patients agree with Broeska, including Linda Friesen of Tisdale, Sask., one of the most outspoken supporters of "Dr. Doug" and his stem cell treatment. "He made it very plain he wasn't a medical doctor from the get-go," she said by phone Wednesday. "He didn't give me any medical advice." Friesen said Broeska changed her life.


www.winnipegfreepress.com

Doug Broeska
Enlarge Image Doug Broeska (LINKEDIN) The move by the university's ethics committee came Wednesday, hours after the Free Press published its investigation into Regenetek owner Doug Broeska's credentials and his clinical trial. The university's move puts an end to Broeska's repeated claim he was about to launch a study with U of W's kinesiology faculty to track and test some of the 70 patients who paid Regenetek as much as $45,000 for experimental stem-cell transplants in India. "The patient outcomes have been so significant that we will soon be announcing a companion study with the University of Winnipeg," Broeska told a prospective patient in an email obtained by the Free Press. "I assure you that I paid tuition, studied with rigour under doctoral advisers and did the course work with the result of a doctoral dissertation," Broeska told the Free Press Monday. "I would appreciate that my hard work to attain my credentials not be treated as insignificant." Broeska also claimed to be a member of the International Cellular Medicine Society. Staff members there say they can find no record of his ever having a membership. Broeska also repeatedly told patients his clinical trial has ethical approval from "several" institutional review boards, including the one managed by the International Cellular Medicine Society, which is also untrue. His treatments do appear to have ethical approval from the Inamdar Hospital in India, and several patients who spoke to the Free Press said they'd experienced significant improvement to their MS symptoms following the treatment in India. But last month, the Inamdar Hospital's ethics committee asked Broeska to step down as principal investigator of the stem-cell clinical trial, warning his lack of credentials and followup "violated international ethical standards. A letter obtained by the Free Press documents the committee's concerns, including that Broeska is not a qualified health practitioner and doesn't have sufficient experience in stem-cell research or neurology to oversee the studies. The committee said diagnosis of the diseases of some patients had been manipulated in the studies investigated. Most worrisome, the ethics committee said it had been informed study patients were being "enforced/blackmailed to stop certain life-saving medicines" without scientific justification. Broeska, who is in Trinidad this week, said by email his trial "is a legitimate and duly registered clinical study based out of India" and his removal as principal investigator was part of a misunderstanding.


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