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Wrong Dorsey Nunn?

Dorsey E. Nunn

Executive Director

LSPC

HQ Phone:  (415) 255-7036

Direct Phone: (415) ***-**** ext. ***direct phone

Email: d***@***.org

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

LSPC

1540 Market St. Ste. 490

San Francisco, California,94102

United States

Company Description

LSPC provides legal advice and technical services on civil legal issues concerning incarcerated parents and their children to California legal service offices (aka Qualified Legal Service Providers). We also provide consultation to government agencies, service...more

Find other employees at this company (48)

Web References(196 Total References)


Staff | LSPC

www.prisonerswithchildren.org [cached]

Dorsey Nunn, Executive Director, has over thirty-five years experience working on prison related issues.
He is the Co-Founder of All of Us or None, a project of LSPC started by formerly incarcerated people in 2003. He has been in the forefront of many social justice organizations from their beginnings, including Critical Resistance and the California Coalition for Women Prisoners. Dorsey has received numerous awards including the "Certificate of Special Congressional Recognition" by Nancy Pelosi and the "Senate Certificate of Recognition by Senator Jackie Speier. Dorsey was sentenced to life in the California Department of Corrections when he was 19 years old.


Staff | LSPC

www.prisonerswithchildren.org [cached]

Dorsey Nunn, Executive Director, has over thirty-five years experience working on prison related issues.
He is the Co-Founder of All of Us or None, a project of LSPC started by formerly incarcerated people in 2003. He has been in the forefront of many social justice organizations from their beginnings, including Critical Resistance and the California Coalition for Women Prisoners. Dorsey has received numerous awards including the "Certificate of Special Congressional Recognition" by Nancy Pelosi and the "Senate Certificate of Recognition by Senator Jackie Speier. Dorsey was sentenced to life in the California Department of Corrections when he was 19 years old. By Dorsey Nunn and Manuel La Fontain By Dorsey Nunn


All of Us or None | LSPC

www.prisonerswithchildren.org [cached]

LSPC Executive Director and AOUON co-founder Dorsey Nunn:
Dorsey Nunn: Real Clear Radio Interview Bill Freeza interviews Dorsey for Real Clear Radio (broadcast 4/30/16), who turns the 20 minutes into Movement magic: clearly conveying LSPC / All of Us or None's current work on Ban the Box & restoring our rights, sharing his personal prison experience, & reminding us that language & labels can encourage or condemn formerly incarcerated people on our route through reentry. Posted innews | TaggedAll of Us or None, ban the box, Dorsey Nunn Dorsey Nunn, executive director of the Legal Services for Prisoners with Children, speaks as California Secretary of State Alex Padilla looks on during a news conference at the Rene C. Davidson Courthouse in Oakland on Aug. 4, 2015. (Anda Chu/Bay Area News Group) Dorsey Nunn, executive director of the Legal Services for Prisoners with Children, speaks as California Secretary of State Alex Padilla looks on during a news conference at the Rene C. Davidson Courthouse in Oakland on Aug. 4, 2015. (Anda Chu/Bay Area News Group) Dorsey Nunn, who was released from prison over 30 years ago and now serves as the executive director of the San Francisco-based Legal Services for Prisoners with Children, one of the plaintiffs that challenged Bowen, said when one doesn't have the right to vote, they question whether they are a full citizen. "This vote that we are talking about is not just simply a vote that belongs to incarcerated or formerly incarcerated people," Nunn said. "It's a vote that belongs to our families, to our children, that was fought for and bled for by people of color. So, to me, today is an excellent day, and it's an excellent start." http://www.contracostatimes.com/breaking-news/ci_28586057/voting-rights-be-restored-tens-thousands-felons-california Posted innews | Tagged#letmevote, #no2jimcrow, #thanksSOS, All of Us or None, Dorsey Nunn, Voting Rights Dorsey Nunn, executive director of LSPC and co-founder of All of Us or None 2 August 2015 - President Barack Obama has received national - and in some cases bipartisan - support for his recent calls to reform criminal justice in the U.S., and some impetus for his ideas might be traced to San Mateo County-based activist Dorsey Nunn. Nunn was among demonstrators who rallied outside the White House on Thursday calling upon the president to follow through on his proposal to "ban the box" on federal employment applications asking job seekers if they've ever been convicted of a crime. Nunn, who is executive director of Legal Services for Prisoners With Children and co-founder of the civil rights group All of Us or None, has been advocating this change for years. In 2013, his organizations helped pass California Assembly Bill 218, which prohibited public employers from asking most job applicants about their conviction histories. California is one of at least 10 states that have removed questions about conviction histories from job applications, and 50 cities or counties have taken similar actions. "Ban the box" legislation does not require public agencies to ignore criminal records where they might be relevant, such as when hiring law enforcement officers. And Nunn said the executive order he's asking the president to sign would still allow federal employers to ask about conviction histories, but those questions would come later when an agency is ready to make an offer of employment. In addition to preventing such questions from being used to screen out applicants, Nunn and his allies are asking for transparency and an appeals process. Applicants denied employment because of past convictions would have a chance to ask employers to consider mitigating factors, Nunn said, such as how long ago they were convicted and whether they've shown signs of being rehabilitated. Rehabilitation is a deeply personal topic for Nunn, who, at the age of 19, was sentenced to life in prison for his role in an incident that left one person dead. Asked whether the life sentence made him think about giving up, Nunn said, "Hope is a hard thing to kill, homey." A father of two at the time of his conviction, Nunn said being able to maintain a relationship with his children was crucial to his rehabilitation. "When I went to prison, I saw people abused and tortured," Nunn said, "My contact with my daughter and other people helped me maintain my humanity in an ugly situation." Nunn was 31 years old when he was released from prison, but he struggled with crack addiction for several years, and says conditions in the East Palo Alto-Menlo Park community he was released into conspired to keep him addicted. "The way we practice re-entry in California is reprehensible," Nunn said, noting that preparing to leave prison can be nerve-wracking for inmates who know they will have no resources or support system on the outside. Nunn eventually cleaned himself up, and with 25 drug-free years under his belt, the activist is something of an evangelist for sobriety, having founded Free At Last Community Recovery, a drug rehab center in East Palo Alto. Despite running an organization with a $1.3 million annual budget, meeting Obama and his staff, and maintaining a quarter-century of sobriety, Nunn says he tries to remain humble and keep a good sense of humor about himself. "I always joke with my kids: if you see me fall off the wagon, hide the check book! Nunn said. http://www.sfexaminer.com/peninsula-activist-lobbies-for-federal-ban-the-box-for-ex-cons/ Posted innews | TaggedAll of Us or None, ban the box, Dorsey Nunn, Executive Order to Ban the Box


Peninsula Activist Lobbies for Federal "Ban the Box" for Ex-cons | LSPC

www.prisonerswithchildren.org [cached]

Dorsey Nunn, executive director of LSPC and co-founder of All of Us or None
2 August 2015 - President Barack Obama has received national - and in some cases bipartisan - support for his recent calls to reform criminal justice in the U.S., and some impetus for his ideas might be traced to San Mateo County-based activist Dorsey Nunn. Nunn was among demonstrators who rallied outside the White House on Thursday calling upon the president to follow through on his proposal to "ban the box" on federal employment applications asking job seekers if they've ever been convicted of a crime. Nunn, who is executive director of Legal Services for Prisoners With Children and co-founder of the civil rights group All of Us or None, has been advocating this change for years. In 2013, his organizations helped pass California Assembly Bill 218, which prohibited public employers from asking most job applicants about their conviction histories. California is one of at least 10 states that have removed questions about conviction histories from job applications, and 50 cities or counties have taken similar actions. "Ban the box" legislation does not require public agencies to ignore criminal records where they might be relevant, such as when hiring law enforcement officers. And Nunn said the executive order he's asking the president to sign would still allow federal employers to ask about conviction histories, but those questions would come later when an agency is ready to make an offer of employment. In addition to preventing such questions from being used to screen out applicants, Nunn and his allies are asking for transparency and an appeals process. Applicants denied employment because of past convictions would have a chance to ask employers to consider mitigating factors, Nunn said, such as how long ago they were convicted and whether they've shown signs of being rehabilitated. Rehabilitation is a deeply personal topic for Nunn, who, at the age of 19, was sentenced to life in prison for his role in an incident that left one person dead. Asked whether the life sentence made him think about giving up, Nunn said, "Hope is a hard thing to kill, homey." A father of two at the time of his conviction, Nunn said being able to maintain a relationship with his children was crucial to his rehabilitation. "When I went to prison, I saw people abused and tortured," Nunn said, "My contact with my daughter and other people helped me maintain my humanity in an ugly situation." Nunn was 31 years old when he was released from prison, but he struggled with crack addiction for several years, and says conditions in the East Palo Alto-Menlo Park community he was released into conspired to keep him addicted. "The way we practice re-entry in California is reprehensible," Nunn said, noting that preparing to leave prison can be nerve-wracking for inmates who know they will have no resources or support system on the outside. Nunn eventually cleaned himself up, and with 25 drug-free years under his belt, the activist is something of an evangelist for sobriety, having founded Free At Last Community Recovery, a drug rehab center in East Palo Alto. Despite running an organization with a $1.3 million annual budget, meeting Obama and his staff, and maintaining a quarter-century of sobriety, Nunn says he tries to remain humble and keep a good sense of humor about himself. "I always joke with my kids: if you see me fall off the wagon, hide the check book! Nunn said. http://www.sfexaminer.com/peninsula-activist-lobbies-for-federal-ban-the-box-for-ex-cons/ This entry was posted in news and tagged All of Us or None, ban the box, Dorsey Nunn, Executive Order to Ban the Box by lspcadmin. Bookmark the permalink.


#thanksSOS | LSPC

www.prisonerswithchildren.org [cached]

Dorsey Nunn, executive director of the Legal Services for Prisoners with Children, speaks as California Secretary of State Alex Padilla looks on during a news conference at the Rene C. Davidson Courthouse in Oakland on Aug. 4, 2015. (Anda Chu/Bay Area News Group)
Dorsey Nunn, executive director of the Legal Services for Prisoners with Children, speaks as California Secretary of State Alex Padilla looks on during a news conference at the Rene C. Davidson Courthouse in Oakland on Aug. 4, 2015. (Anda Chu/Bay Area News Group) Dorsey Nunn, who was released from prison over 30 years ago and now serves as the executive director of the San Francisco-based Legal Services for Prisoners with Children, one of the plaintiffs that challenged Bowen, said when one doesn't have the right to vote, they question whether they are a full citizen. "This vote that we are talking about is not just simply a vote that belongs to incarcerated or formerly incarcerated people," Nunn said. "It's a vote that belongs to our families, to our children, that was fought for and bled for by people of color. So, to me, today is an excellent day, and it's an excellent start." http://www.contracostatimes.com/breaking-news/ci_28586057/voting-rights-be-restored-tens-thousands-felons-california Posted innews | Tagged#letmevote, #no2jimcrow, #thanksSOS, All of Us or None, Dorsey Nunn, Voting Rights


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