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Wrong Dorsey Nunn?

Mr. Dorsey Nunn E.

Executive Director of Legal Services

Prisoners

Prisoners

Background Information

Employment History

Executive Director
LSPC

Affiliations

Co-Founder
All of Us or None

Founder
Us or None

Co-Founder
None

Co-Founder
FICPM

Board Member
Legal Aid Association of California

Web References (189 Total References)


Dorsey Nunn, Executive ...

www.realclearradio.org [cached]

Dorsey Nunn, Executive Director of Legal Services for Prisoners with Children and Co-founder of All of Us or None, speaks firsthand about the challenges of reentering the workforce post-incarceration. Nunn argues that current laws peddle fear and encourage recidivism. He makes the case for reforms encouraging rehabilitation and opportunity such as the Ban the Box campaign he helped launch.


news | LSPC | Page 3

www.prisonerswithchildren.org [cached]

Dorsey Nunn, executive director of Legal Services for Prisoners with Children and co-founder of All of Us or None, alleges that if the federal government is going to spend his tax dollars, then he should have access to everything that they spend his money on. That includes jobs with companies that do business with and for the federal government.

"There are boxes all over the place that exclude me from access to a meaningful life," said Nunn. "'Ban the box' is more than a question of fair chance hiring. I want the full restoration of my civil and human rights and this is just the first step in the process."
http://www.districtchronicles.com/news/view.php/867451/Pressure-builds-for-Feds-to-Ban-the-Box
Posted innews | TaggedAll of Us or None, ban the box, Dorsey Nunn, Executive Order to Ban the Box
...
"It's rewarding to witness the work started in our backyard reach national levels, and continue to dismantle the barriers facing formerly incarcerated communities," said co-founding member, Dorsey Nunn, of All Of Us Or None.
...
Dorsey Nunn talks about Apple's hiring policies on KPFA's "Rude Awakenings" show
...
Dorsey Nunn talks to Davey D. about Apple's firing of formerly incarcerated construction workers
...
"The trip to the White House for me is really meaningful," said Dorsey Nunn, who now runs the San Francisco-based charity Legal Services for Prisoners with Children and went to prison in 1971 - at the age of 19 - in connection with a liquor store robbery in which the store's owner was killed.
"I had to sit down and wrap my head around the fact that I had walked through both the gates of San Quentin and the gates of the White House compound," Nunn said in an interview, referring to a visit he paid to the White House for another event last year.
...
By Dorsey Nunn and Manuel La Fontain
...
By Dorsey Nunn


news | LSPC | Page 2

www.prisonerswithchildren.org [cached]

by Dorsey Nunn

...
Dorsey Nunn speaks at the Aug. 23, 2011, rally prior to the historic Assembly hearing in Sacramento on solitary confinement following the first mass hunger strike. - Photo: Bill Hackwell
...
Dorsey Nunn, who was himself formerly incarcerated, is executive director of Legal Services for Prisoners with Children and a founder of All of Us or None, an activist organization for formerly incarcerated people. He can be reached at dorsey@prisonerswithchildren.org or at LSPC, 1540 Market St., Suite 490, San Francisco, CA 94102, 415-255-7036.
...
Dorsey Nunn, executive director of the Legal Services for Prisoners with Children, speaks as California Secretary of State Alex Padilla looks on during a news conference at the Rene C. Davidson Courthouse in Oakland on Aug. 4, 2015. (Anda Chu/Bay Area News Group)
Dorsey Nunn, executive director of the Legal Services for Prisoners with Children, speaks as California Secretary of State Alex Padilla looks on during a news conference at the Rene C. Davidson Courthouse in Oakland on Aug. 4, 2015. (Anda Chu/Bay Area News Group)
...
Dorsey Nunn, who was released from prison over 30 years ago and now serves as the executive director of the San Francisco-based Legal Services for Prisoners with Children, one of the plaintiffs that challenged Bowen, said when one doesn't have the right to vote, they question whether they are a full citizen.
...
"This vote that we are talking about is not just simply a vote that belongs to incarcerated or formerly incarcerated people," Nunn said. "It's a vote that belongs to our families, to our children, that was fought for and bled for by people of color. So, to me, today is an excellent day, and it's an excellent start."
http://www.contracostatimes.com/breaking-news/ci_28586057/voting-rights-be-restored-tens-thousands-felons-california
Posted innews | Tagged#letmevote, #no2jimcrow, #thanksSOS, All of Us or None, Dorsey Nunn, Voting Rights
...
Dorsey Nunn, executive director of LSPC and co-founder of All of Us or None
2 August 2015 - President Barack Obama has received national - and in some cases bipartisan - support for his recent calls to reform criminal justice in the U.S., and some impetus for his ideas might be traced to San Mateo County-based activist Dorsey Nunn.
...
Nunn was among demonstrators who rallied outside the White House on Thursday calling upon the president to follow through on his proposal to "ban the box" on federal employment applications asking job seekers if they've ever been convicted of a crime.
Nunn, who is executive director of Legal Services for Prisoners With Children and co-founder of the civil rights group All of Us or None, has been advocating this change for years. In 2013, his organizations helped pass California Assembly Bill 218, which prohibited public employers from asking most job applicants about their conviction histories.
California is one of at least 10 states that have removed questions about conviction histories from job applications, and 50 cities or counties have taken similar actions.
"Ban the box" legislation does not require public agencies to ignore criminal records where they might be relevant, such as when hiring law enforcement officers. And Nunn said the executive order he's asking the president to sign would still allow federal employers to ask about conviction histories, but those questions would come later when an agency is ready to make an offer of employment.
In addition to preventing such questions from being used to screen out applicants, Nunn and his allies are asking for transparency and an appeals process. Applicants denied employment because of past convictions would have a chance to ask employers to consider mitigating factors, Nunn said, such as how long ago they were convicted and whether they've shown signs of being rehabilitated.
Rehabilitation is a deeply personal topic for Nunn, who, at the age of 19, was sentenced to life in prison for his role in an incident that left one person dead. Asked whether the life sentence made him think about giving up, Nunn said, "Hope is a hard thing to kill, homey."
A father of two at the time of his conviction, Nunn said being able to maintain a relationship with his children was crucial to his rehabilitation.
"When I went to prison, I saw people abused and tortured," Nunn said, "My contact with my daughter and other people helped me maintain my humanity in an ugly situation."
Nunn was 31 years old when he was released from prison, but he struggled with crack addiction for several years, and says conditions in the East Palo Alto-Menlo Park community he was released into conspired to keep him addicted.
"The way we practice re-entry in California is reprehensible," Nunn said, noting that preparing to leave prison can be nerve-wracking for inmates who know they will have no resources or support system on the outside.
Nunn eventually cleaned himself up, and with 25 drug-free years under his belt, the activist is something of an evangelist for sobriety, having founded Free At Last Community Recovery, a drug rehab center in East Palo Alto.
Despite running an organization with a $1.3 million annual budget, meeting Obama and his staff, and maintaining a quarter-century of sobriety, Nunn says he tries to remain humble and keep a good sense of humor about himself.
"I always joke with my kids: if you see me fall off the wagon, hide the check book! Nunn said.
http://www.sfexaminer.com/peninsula-activist-lobbies-for-federal-ban-the-box-for-ex-cons/
Posted innews | TaggedAll of Us or None, ban the box, Dorsey Nunn, Executive Order to Ban the Box
...
Advocates such as Dorsey Nunn, executive director of All of Us or None, says the president is on the right track, but needs to do more. He says the president has to focus on helping not just people convicted of nonviolent drug offenses, but all people who've served their time and are released. He says this especially holds true for those people convicted of violent offenses who need the additional support so they don't land back in the clutches of the criminal justice system.
That's why Nunn is making the trip from San Francisco to D.C. on Thursday.
"We're demanding that he lead," and give the 70 million Americans with criminal records a fair chance to success, he says.
Working to give formerly incarcerated people their rights back has been an issue he has felt deeply and personally since he left prison 34 years ago. He has been fighting for prisoners' rights ever since.
"I went in at 19 and got out at 31," he says. He says the world that existed when he went in as a young man had change drastically when he was released in 1981. That's when he saw a flaw in the society he lived in.
"I had no clue of our societal addiction to punishment," he says.
...
Unlike many of his compatriots, Dorsey was able to find work two week after he was released, working for the Prison Law Office, where he would began fighting for better conditions for the imprisoned of our country. "It gave me a deeper purpose," he says.
Dorsey and fellow advocates came up with the concept and the term of "ban the box" as a way to give the formerly incarcerated a fair chance for work. At the heart of the proposal is that an applicant's qualifications are the first consideration, not their previous convictions. This would allow applicants to be judged on their merits as opposed to the blacklisting that comes with a felony conviction.
The current difficulties that the formerly incarcerated have with finding work has contributed to the vicious cycle that has become America's prison industry, where people get out, can't find work that sustains them and their families and commit an act that find them back in the prison system.
"My success would be don't go back to prison," Dorsey says. He says prison does little to rehabilitate and that the "box" people have to check off when applying for work about their conviction history was another tool in the vicious cycle of felony discrimination.
"That box was the bane of my existence," he says. "That box banned me from health care for my family and made our children less healthy."
He says he is frustrated with the nation's idea that punishment is the only way to address crime and our inability as a society to forgive those who have paid their debt to society. He says part of that also means recognizing that our current criminal justice system, which incarcerates black men at higher rates than other groups, is a symptom of the structural discrimination that exists in our society.
Dorsey and other advocates from across the country will descend on W


Dorsey Nunn | LSPC

www.prisonerswithchildren.org [cached]

Tag Archives: Dorsey Nunn

...
Key among them is Dorsey Nunn, who himself was incarcerated more than 35 years ago for being involved in a murder.
It is a journey that has taken him from a cell at San Quentin State Prison to walking the halls of the White House; where he was invited after coining the phrase "ban the box," an employment document notation for criminal history that is being eliminated nationally by legislation.
"When you get down deep, you see the voting right is the definition of citizenship," said Nunn.
...
Posted innews | Tagged#letmevote, #no2jimcrow, Dorsey Nunn, Voting Rights
...
Dorsey Nunn, executive director of the Legal Services for Prisoners with Children, speaks as California Secretary of State Alex Padilla looks on during a news conference at the Rene C. Davidson Courthouse in Oakland on Aug. 4, 2015. (Anda Chu/Bay Area News Group)
Dorsey Nunn, executive director of the Legal Services for Prisoners with Children, speaks as California Secretary of State Alex Padilla looks on during a news conference at the Rene C. Davidson Courthouse in Oakland on Aug. 4, 2015. (Anda Chu/Bay Area News Group)
...
Dorsey Nunn, who was released from prison over 30 years ago and now serves as the executive director of the San Francisco-based Legal Services for Prisoners with Children, one of the plaintiffs that challenged Bowen, said when one doesn't have the right to vote, they question whether they are a full citizen.
...
"This vote that we are talking about is not just simply a vote that belongs to incarcerated or formerly incarcerated people," Nunn said. "It's a vote that belongs to our families, to our children, that was fought for and bled for by people of color. So, to me, today is an excellent day, and it's an excellent start."
http://www.contracostatimes.com/breaking-news/ci_28586057/voting-rights-be-restored-tens-thousands-felons-california
Posted innews | Tagged#letmevote, #no2jimcrow, #thanksSOS, All of Us or None, Dorsey Nunn, Voting Rights
...
Dorsey Nunn, executive director of LSPC and co-founder of All of Us or None
2 August 2015 - President Barack Obama has received national - and in some cases bipartisan - support for his recent calls to reform criminal justice in the U.S., and some impetus for his ideas might be traced to San Mateo County-based activist Dorsey Nunn.
...
Nunn was among demonstrators who rallied outside the White House on Thursday calling upon the president to follow through on his proposal to "ban the box" on federal employment applications asking job seekers if they've ever been convicted of a crime.
Nunn, who is executive director of Legal Services for Prisoners With Children and co-founder of the civil rights group All of Us or None, has been advocating this change for years. In 2013, his organizations helped pass California Assembly Bill 218, which prohibited public employers from asking most job applicants about their conviction histories.
California is one of at least 10 states that have removed questions about conviction histories from job applications, and 50 cities or counties have taken similar actions.
"Ban the box" legislation does not require public agencies to ignore criminal records where they might be relevant, such as when hiring law enforcement officers. And Nunn said the executive order he's asking the president to sign would still allow federal employers to ask about conviction histories, but those questions would come later when an agency is ready to make an offer of employment.
In addition to preventing such questions from being used to screen out applicants, Nunn and his allies are asking for transparency and an appeals process. Applicants denied employment because of past convictions would have a chance to ask employers to consider mitigating factors, Nunn said, such as how long ago they were convicted and whether they've shown signs of being rehabilitated.
Rehabilitation is a deeply personal topic for Nunn, who, at the age of 19, was sentenced to life in prison for his role in an incident that left one person dead. Asked whether the life sentence made him think about giving up, Nunn said, "Hope is a hard thing to kill, homey."
A father of two at the time of his conviction, Nunn said being able to maintain a relationship with his children was crucial to his rehabilitation.
"When I went to prison, I saw people abused and tortured," Nunn said, "My contact with my daughter and other people helped me maintain my humanity in an ugly situation."
Nunn was 31 years old when he was released from prison, but he struggled with crack addiction for several years, and says conditions in the East Palo Alto-Menlo Park community he was released into conspired to keep him addicted.
"The way we practice re-entry in California is reprehensible," Nunn said, noting that preparing to leave prison can be nerve-wracking for inmates who know they will have no resources or support system on the outside.
Nunn eventually cleaned himself up, and with 25 drug-free years under his belt, the activist is something of an evangelist for sobriety, having founded Free At Last Community Recovery, a drug rehab center in East Palo Alto.
Despite running an organization with a $1.3 million annual budget, meeting Obama and his staff, and maintaining a quarter-century of sobriety, Nunn says he tries to remain humble and keep a good sense of humor about himself.
"I always joke with my kids: if you see me fall off the wagon, hide the check book! Nunn said.
http://www.sfexaminer.com/peninsula-activist-lobbies-for-federal-ban-the-box-for-ex-cons/
Posted innews | TaggedAll of Us or None, ban the box, Dorsey Nunn, Executive Order to Ban the Box
...
Advocates such as Dorsey Nunn, executive director of All of Us or None, says the president is on the right track, but needs to do more. He says the president has to focus on helping not just people convicted of nonviolent drug offenses, but all people who've served their time and are released. He says this especially holds true for those people convicted of violent offenses who need the additional support so they don't land back in the clutches of the criminal justice system.
That's why Nunn is making the trip from San Francisco to D.C. on Thursday.
"We're demanding that he lead," and give the 70 million Americans with criminal records a fair chance to success, he says.
Working to give formerly incarcerated people their rights back has been an issue he has felt deeply and personally since he left prison 34 years ago. He has been fighting for prisoners' rights ever since.
"I went in at 19 and got out at 31," he says. He says the world that existed when he went in as a young man had change drastically when he was released in 1981. That's when he saw a flaw in the society he lived in.
"I had no clue of our societal addiction to punishment," he says.
...
Unlike many of his compatriots, Dorsey was able to find work two week after he was released, working for the Prison Law Office, where he would began fighting for better conditions for the imprisoned of our country. "It gave me a deeper purpose," he says.
Dorsey and fellow advocates came up with the concept and the term of "ban the box" as a way to give the formerly incarcerated a fair chance for work. At the heart of the proposal is that an applicant's qualifications are the first consideration, not their previous convictions. This would allow applicants to be judged on their merits as opposed to the blacklisting that comes with a felony conviction.
The current difficulties that the formerly incarcerated have with finding work has contributed to the vicious cycle that has become America's prison industry, where people get out, can't find work that sustains them and their families and commit an act that find them back in the prison system.
"My success would be don't go back to prison," Dorsey says. He says prison does little to rehabilitate and that the "box" people have to check off when applying for work about their conviction history was another tool in the vicious cycle of felony discrimination.
"That box was the bane of my existence," he says. "That box banned me from health care for my family and made our children less healthy."
He says he is frustrated with the nation's idea that punishment is the only way to address crime and our inability as a society to forgive those who have paid their debt to society. He says part of that also means recognizing that our current criminal justice system, which incarcerates black men at higher rates than other groups, is a symptom of the structural discrimination that exists in our society.
Dorsey and other


All of Us or None | LSPC

www.prisonerswithchildren.org [cached]

Dorsey Nunn, executive director of the Legal Services for Prisoners with Children, speaks as California Secretary of State Alex Padilla looks on during a news conference at the Rene C. Davidson Courthouse in Oakland on Aug. 4, 2015. (Anda Chu/Bay Area News Group)

Dorsey Nunn, executive director of the Legal Services for Prisoners with Children, speaks as California Secretary of State Alex Padilla looks on during a news conference at the Rene C. Davidson Courthouse in Oakland on Aug. 4, 2015. (Anda Chu/Bay Area News Group)
...
Dorsey Nunn, who was released from prison over 30 years ago and now serves as the executive director of the San Francisco-based Legal Services for Prisoners with Children, one of the plaintiffs that challenged Bowen, said when one doesn't have the right to vote, they question whether they are a full citizen.
...
"This vote that we are talking about is not just simply a vote that belongs to incarcerated or formerly incarcerated people," Nunn said. "It's a vote that belongs to our families, to our children, that was fought for and bled for by people of color. So, to me, today is an excellent day, and it's an excellent start."
http://www.contracostatimes.com/breaking-news/ci_28586057/voting-rights-be-restored-tens-thousands-felons-california
Posted innews | Tagged#letmevote, #no2jimcrow, #thanksSOS, All of Us or None, Dorsey Nunn, Voting Rights
...
Dorsey Nunn, executive director of LSPC and co-founder of All of Us or None
2 August 2015 - President Barack Obama has received national - and in some cases bipartisan - support for his recent calls to reform criminal justice in the U.S., and some impetus for his ideas might be traced to San Mateo County-based activist Dorsey Nunn.
...
Nunn was among demonstrators who rallied outside the White House on Thursday calling upon the president to follow through on his proposal to "ban the box" on federal employment applications asking job seekers if they've ever been convicted of a crime.
Nunn, who is executive director of Legal Services for Prisoners With Children and co-founder of the civil rights group All of Us or None, has been advocating this change for years. In 2013, his organizations helped pass California Assembly Bill 218, which prohibited public employers from asking most job applicants about their conviction histories.
California is one of at least 10 states that have removed questions about conviction histories from job applications, and 50 cities or counties have taken similar actions.
"Ban the box" legislation does not require public agencies to ignore criminal records where they might be relevant, such as when hiring law enforcement officers. And Nunn said the executive order he's asking the president to sign would still allow federal employers to ask about conviction histories, but those questions would come later when an agency is ready to make an offer of employment.
In addition to preventing such questions from being used to screen out applicants, Nunn and his allies are asking for transparency and an appeals process. Applicants denied employment because of past convictions would have a chance to ask employers to consider mitigating factors, Nunn said, such as how long ago they were convicted and whether they've shown signs of being rehabilitated.
Rehabilitation is a deeply personal topic for Nunn, who, at the age of 19, was sentenced to life in prison for his role in an incident that left one person dead. Asked whether the life sentence made him think about giving up, Nunn said, "Hope is a hard thing to kill, homey."
A father of two at the time of his conviction, Nunn said being able to maintain a relationship with his children was crucial to his rehabilitation.
"When I went to prison, I saw people abused and tortured," Nunn said, "My contact with my daughter and other people helped me maintain my humanity in an ugly situation."
Nunn was 31 years old when he was released from prison, but he struggled with crack addiction for several years, and says conditions in the East Palo Alto-Menlo Park community he was released into conspired to keep him addicted.
"The way we practice re-entry in California is reprehensible," Nunn said, noting that preparing to leave prison can be nerve-wracking for inmates who know they will have no resources or support system on the outside.
Nunn eventually cleaned himself up, and with 25 drug-free years under his belt, the activist is something of an evangelist for sobriety, having founded Free At Last Community Recovery, a drug rehab center in East Palo Alto.
Despite running an organization with a $1.3 million annual budget, meeting Obama and his staff, and maintaining a quarter-century of sobriety, Nunn says he tries to remain humble and keep a good sense of humor about himself.
"I always joke with my kids: if you see me fall off the wagon, hide the check book! Nunn said.
http://www.sfexaminer.com/peninsula-activist-lobbies-for-federal-ban-the-box-for-ex-cons/
Posted innews | TaggedAll of Us or None, ban the box, Dorsey Nunn, Executive Order to Ban the Box
...
Advocates such as Dorsey Nunn, executive director of All of Us or None, says the president is on the right track, but needs to do more. He says the president has to focus on helping not just people convicted of nonviolent drug offenses, but all people who've served their time and are released. He says this especially holds true for those people convicted of violent offenses who need the additional support so they don't land back in the clutches of the criminal justice system.
That's why Nunn is making the trip from San Francisco to D.C. on Thursday.
"We're demanding that he lead," and give the 70 million Americans with criminal records a fair chance to success, he says.
Working to give formerly incarcerated people their rights back has been an issue he has felt deeply and personally since he left prison 34 years ago. He has been fighting for prisoners' rights ever since.
"I went in at 19 and got out at 31," he says. He says the world that existed when he went in as a young man had change drastically when he was released in 1981. That's when he saw a flaw in the society he lived in.
"I had no clue of our societal addiction to punishment," he says.
...
Unlike many of his compatriots, Dorsey was able to find work two week after he was released, working for the Prison Law Office, where he would began fighting for better conditions for the imprisoned of our country. "It gave me a deeper purpose," he says.
Dorsey and fellow advocates came up with the concept and the term of "ban the box" as a way to give the formerly incarcerated a fair chance for work. At the heart of the proposal is that an applicant's qualifications are the first consideration, not their previous convictions. This would allow applicants to be judged on their merits as opposed to the blacklisting that comes with a felony conviction.
The current difficulties that the formerly incarcerated have with finding work has contributed to the vicious cycle that has become America's prison industry, where people get out, can't find work that sustains them and their families and commit an act that find them back in the prison system.
"My success would be don't go back to prison," Dorsey says. He says prison does little to rehabilitate and that the "box" people have to check off when applying for work about their conviction history was another tool in the vicious cycle of felony discrimination.
"That box was the bane of my existence," he says. "That box banned me from health care for my family and made our children less healthy."
He says he is frustrated with the nation's idea that punishment is the only way to address crime and our inability as a society to forgive those who have paid their debt to society. He says part of that also means recognizing that our current criminal justice system, which incarcerates black men at higher rates than other groups, is a symptom of the structural discrimination that exists in our society.
Dorsey and other advocates from across the country will descend on Washington this Thursday to insist that forgiveness through rehabilitation and resources be part of the solution.
For Dorsey, the fight doesn't just end with the President's support but a nationwide awakening for employers to recognize that formerly convicted felons deserve a second chance.
"If we can drive American corporations to stop discriminating, we can stop this," he says.
http://www.communitychange.org/that-box-was-the-bane-of-my-existence/
Posted innews | TaggedAll of Us or None, ban the box, Dorsey Nunn, Executive Order to Ban the Box
...
Dorsey Nunn,

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