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This profile was last updated on 6/29/09  and contains information from public web pages.

Donna Kahiwaokawailani Kahakui

Wrong Donna Kahiwaokawailani Kahakui?
 
Background

Employment History

Board Memberships and Affiliations

Education

  • Punahou School
20 Total References
Web References
More Fish In the Sea
www.morefishhawaii.com, 29 June 2009 [cached]
Donna Kahi Kahakui, a renown paddler, EPA special agent and founder of Kai Makana.
Mālama Hawai‘i
www.malamahawaii.org, 2 Mar 2006 [cached]
Along with champion paddler Donna Kahakui, Lee Loy paddled 200-miles from O'ahu to Ni'ihau to help promote ocean conservation.
...
He adds, "Paddling with Donna, I felt like the whole ocean catered to her. It was amazing. Things just went her way, and because I was with her I didn't feel as tired."
This four-day trek was monumental for Kahakui and her nonprofit organization, Kai Makana, as it marked the end of a series of yearly paddles dedicated to ocean awareness.
...
Starting in 1998, Kahakui paddled 78-miles from Maui to O'ahu. The following year she made a 140-mile solo paddle from the Big Island to O'ahu. In 2000, she completed another 140-mile trip, circumnavigating around O'ahu. In 2001, it was off to New York where she paddled 55-miles down the Hudson River from West Point to the Statue of Liberty.
...
Kahakui started her distance paddles because she's tired of people not caring for the ocean's resources. She says, dolphins with cuts from abandoned nets, trash floating in the ocean, and a severe decline in nearshore fish are all parts of the problem.
Kahakui says, "Our ancestors were the best conservationists and scientists and we've lost that. We have to take a look back at our traditional history and ask how Hawaiians were able to figure out ahupua'a concepts and how they knew when to fish for certain species. These traditional Hawaiians worked on abundance for the resource, not just sustaining it. They always worked on providing for the next generation."
These sentiments ring true to Ross Tilton, a young paddler who looks up to Kahakui and Lee Loy.
...
Donna Kahiwaokawailani Kahakui, 42, renowned paddler and founder of Kai Makana, a non-profit organization dedicated to perpetuating ocean awareness for the next generation, has made the isolated village a top priority for her beach clean-up events.
...
Kahakui explains that she has been coming to the island for the past three years. She says, "These people are trying to sustain the old fishing ways by using throw net and developing a fish pond, but so many people come out here and over fish the area."
...
Kahakui is passionate about the environment. Along with her paddling career and Kai Makana organization, she is also a federal agent for the Environmental Protection Agency. She explains that most of the trash found on Mokauea floats from Oahu's Sand Island area. To illustrate her point Kahakui held up a photograph she snapped during a September 2004 trip to Kaho'olawe. In the photo thousands of pounds of trash are visible on the uninhabited Island.
She says, "Nobody lives there and this is how much rubbish is at Kanapou Bay, this is where we went. And when we actually did the clean-up, unfortunately, it still kind of looked like this."
But regardless of how measurable clean-up efforts appear on the surface, Kahakui says the most important thing she does is educate the next generation of local conservationists.
She says, "Hawaiians used to be the best scientists in the world and we still can't figure out half the things they did. So to try and get all Polynesian kids involved in science with them not even recognizing the science is a major goal."
She continues, "Get outside learn how to paddle, go to another place, take care of other people, and learn that water is not necessarily as clean as you may think.
Chronicling O'ahu women on film - The Honolulu Advertiser
www.honoluluadvertiser.com, 26 Sept 2006 [cached]
Donna Kahakui
"The ocean and I are one and the same," says waterwoman and environmental activist Donna Kahakui.The founder of the marine education nonprofit Kai Makana, Kahakui paddled 200 miles from O'ahu to Ni'ihau to raise money and awareness for ocean conservation in 2004.
...
A federal agent with the Environmental Protection Agency's Hawai'i office, Kahakui continues to paddle.
Untitled Document
www.kaimakana.org, 23 June 2008 [cached]
Donna Kahakui
...
You just got to believe," said Kai Makana founder Donna Kahakui.
...
said Donna Kahakui.
The goal is to someday turn Mokauea into a place of learning. "People all over the world, our kids can come to it. They can learn about native fish ponds, they can learn about how to restore native limu they can learn about self sustainability, and enjoying the ocean, and getting out and working together," said Donna Kahakui.
Mālama Hawai‘i
malamahawaii.org [cached]
Along with champion paddler Donna Kahakui, Lee Loy paddled 200-miles from O'ahu to Ni'ihau to help promote ocean conservation.
...
This four-day trek was monumental for Kahakui and her nonprofit organization, Kai Makana, as it marked the end of a series of yearly paddles dedicated to ocean awareness.
...
Starting in 1998, Kahakui paddled 78-miles from Maui to O'ahu.The following year she made a 140-mile solo paddle from the Big Island to O'ahu.In 2000, she completed another 140-mile trip, circumnavigating around O'ahu.In 2001, it was off to New York where she paddled 55-miles down the Hudson River from West Point to the Statue of Liberty.
...
Kahakui started her distance paddles because she's tired of people not caring for the ocean's resources.She says, dolphins with cuts from abandoned nets, trash floating in the ocean, and a severe decline in nearshore fish are all parts of the problem.
Kahakui says, "Our ancestors were the best conservationists and scientists and we've lost that.We have to take a look back at our traditional history and ask how Hawaiians were able to figure out ahupua'a concepts and how they knew when to fish for certain species.These traditional Hawaiians worked on abundance for the resource, not just sustaining it.They always worked on providing for the next generation."
These sentiments ring true to Ross Tilton, a young paddler who looks up to Kahakui and Lee Loy.
...
Donna Kahiwaokawailani Kahakui, 42, renowned paddler and founder of Kai Makana, a non-profit organization dedicated to perpetuating ocean awareness for the next generation, has made the isolated village a top priority for her beach clean-up events.
...
Kahakui explains that she has been coming to the island for the past three years.She says, "These people are trying to sustain the old fishing ways by using throw net and developing a fish pond, but so many people come out here and over fish the area."
...
Kahakui is passionate about the environment.Along with her paddling career and Kai Makana organization, she is also a federal agent for the Environmental Protection Agency.She explains that most of the trash found on Mokauea floats from Oahu's Sand Island area.To illustrate her point Kahakui held up a photograph she snapped during a September 2004 trip to Kaho'olawe.In the photo thousands of pounds of trash are visible on the uninhabited Island.
She says, "Nobody lives there and this is how much rubbish is at Kanapou Bay, this is where we went.And when we actually did the clean-up, unfortunately, it still kind of looked like this."
But regardless of how measurable clean-up efforts appear on the surface, Kahakui says the most important thing she does is educate the next generation of local conservationists.
She says, "Hawaiians used to be the best scientists in the world and we still can't figure out half the things they did.So to try and get all Polynesian kids involved in science with them not even recognizing the science is a major goal."
She continues, "Get outside learn how to paddle, go to another place, take care of other people, and learn that water is not necessarily as clean as you may think.
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