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2009-12-07T00:00:00.000Z

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Don Pitts

HQ Phone: (937) 378-4424

Email: d***@***.gov

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Natural Resources Conservation Service

706 South Main Street

Georgetown, Ohio 45121

United States

Company Description

The Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) works with private landowners to help them protect the soil and water on their land. The agency has offices in each of Iowa's 99 counties. ... more

Find other employees at this company (774)

Background Information

Employment History

Agricultural Engineer

NRCS

Air Quality Specialist

USDA

Engineer

USDA

Associate Editor for the Soil and Water Division

American Society of Agricultural Engineers

Irrigation and Drainage Engineer

University of Florida

Affiliations

Planning Committee Member
Rivers Institute at Hanover College

Education

MS

Agricultural Engineering

University of Arkansas

PhD

Agricultural Engineering

University of Arkansas

Web References (33 Total References)


This practice - known as drainage ...

southeastfarmpress.com [cached]

This practice - known as drainage water management, or controlled drainage - cuts nitrate loads flowing into surface waters through the tile system, especially during the fallow period, says Don Pitts, a drainage expert for the Natural Resource Conservation Service in Illinois. And during the growing season, controlled drainage stores moisture and nutrients for the crop, offering the potential for higher yields in dry years, he says.

...
In Illinois, where more than 50 on-farm demonstration systems have been installed, drainage water management has cut tile outflow by 40 percent, Pitts says.
...
Maintaining the water table 2 feet below the surface, rather than the typical 4 feet, retains up to 1.5 inches of additional water in the soil, Pitts says. "This equals about six days' water supply for a corn crop in July, and thus, could have a significant crop production benefit."
The cost of controlled drainage depends mainly on the steepness of the field and the size of the tile mains. Retrofitting 81 outlet structures on existing tile systems in Illinois ranged from about $25 per acre on flat sites to more than $250 per acre on sloping fields, Pitts says.
...
Pitts contends that drainage management "is arguably the conservation practice with the highest benefit-to-cost ratio for reducing nitrate loss."


This practice - known as drainage ...

southeastfarmpress.com [cached]

This practice - known as drainage water management, or controlled drainage - cuts nitrate loads flowing into surface waters through the tile system, especially during the fallow period, says Don Pitts, a drainage expert for the Natural Resource Conservation Service in Illinois. And during the growing season, controlled drainage stores moisture and nutrients for the crop, offering the potential for higher yields in dry years, he says.

...
In Illinois, where more than 50 on-farm demonstration systems have been installed, drainage water management has cut tile outflow by 40 percent, Pitts says.
...
Maintaining the water table 2 feet below the surface, rather than the typical 4 feet, retains up to 1.5 inches of additional water in the soil, Pitts says. "This equals about six days' water supply for a corn crop in July, and thus, could have a significant crop production benefit."
The cost of controlled drainage depends mainly on the steepness of the field and the size of the tile mains. Retrofitting 81 outlet structures on existing tile systems in Illinois ranged from about $25 per acre on flat sites to more than $250 per acre on sloping fields, Pitts says.
...
Pitts contends that drainage management "is arguably the conservation practice with the highest benefit-to-cost ratio for reducing nitrate loss."


This practice - known as drainage ...

deltafarmpress.com [cached]

This practice - known as drainage water management, or controlled drainage - cuts nitrate loads flowing into surface waters through the tile system, especially during the fallow period, says Don Pitts, a drainage expert for the Natural Resource Conservation Service in Illinois. And during the growing season, controlled drainage stores moisture and nutrients for the crop, offering the potential for higher yields in dry years, he says.

...
In Illinois, where more than 50 on-farm demonstration systems have been installed, drainage water management has cut tile outflow by 40 percent, Pitts says.
...
Maintaining the water table 2 feet below the surface, rather than the typical 4 feet, retains up to 1.5 inches of additional water in the soil, Pitts says. "This equals about six days' water supply for a corn crop in July, and thus, could have a significant crop production benefit."
The cost of controlled drainage depends mainly on the steepness of the field and the size of the tile mains. Retrofitting 81 outlet structures on existing tile systems in Illinois ranged from about $25 per acre on flat sites to more than $250 per acre on sloping fields, Pitts says.
...
Pitts contends that drainage management "is arguably the conservation practice with the highest benefit-to-cost ratio for reducing nitrate loss."


This practice - known as drainage ...

deltafarmpress.com [cached]

This practice - known as drainage water management, or controlled drainage - cuts nitrate loads flowing into surface waters through the tile system, especially during the fallow period, says Don Pitts, a drainage expert for the Natural Resource Conservation Service in Illinois. And during the growing season, controlled drainage stores moisture and nutrients for the crop, offering the potential for higher yields in dry years, he says.

...
In Illinois, where more than 50 on-farm demonstration systems have been installed, drainage water management has cut tile outflow by 40 percent, Pitts says.
...
Maintaining the water table 2 feet below the surface, rather than the typical 4 feet, retains up to 1.5 inches of additional water in the soil, Pitts says. "This equals about six days' water supply for a corn crop in July, and thus, could have a significant crop production benefit."
The cost of controlled drainage depends mainly on the steepness of the field and the size of the tile mains. Retrofitting 81 outlet structures on existing tile systems in Illinois ranged from about $25 per acre on flat sites to more than $250 per acre on sloping fields, Pitts says.
...
Pitts contends that drainage management "is arguably the conservation practice with the highest benefit-to-cost ratio for reducing nitrate loss."


Rivers Institute : Nonpoint Source Pollution Conference : Planning Committee

www.riversinstitute.org [cached]

Donald Pitts Natural Resource Conservation Service, Illinois

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