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Wrong Don Pitts?

Don Pitts

Engineer

U.S. Department of Agriculture

HQ Phone:  (202) 720-2791

Direct Phone: (217) ***-****direct phone

Email: d***@***.gov

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

U.S. Department of Agriculture

1400 Independence Avenue, S.W.

Washington, D.C., District of Columbia,20250

United States

Company Description

USDA is an equal opportunity provider, employer and lender. To file a complaint of discrimination, write: USDA, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights, Office of Adjudication, 1400 Independence Ave., SW, Washington, DC 20250-9410 or call (866) 632-... more.

Find other employees at this company (21,151)

Background Information

Employment History

Agricultural Engineer

NRCS


Associate Editor for the Soil and Water Division

American Society of Agricultural Engineers


Irrigation and Drainage Engineer

University of Florida


Affiliations

Rivers Institute at Hanover College

Planning Committee Member


Education

MS

Agricultural Engineering

University of Arkansas


PhD

Agricultural Engineering

University of Arkansas


Web References(16 Total References)


Agricultural Drainage Management: Benefits Could Range from the Bin to the Gulf

www.ctic.org [cached]

"The first step was to drain the land so it was farmable," notes Don Pitts, state water and air quality specialist with the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) in Champaign, Ill. "Now it's time to manage that drainage."
For cost-efficiency's sake, Pitts likes to see each control structure manage a zone of the field of at least 20 acres. Even now, Pitts notes that some growers are willing to put in the extra structures to manage smaller zones, and to put in the extra time to adjust more stop logs. Don Pitts of the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service state office in Champaign, Ill., says retrofitting existing pattern tile drainage systems on an ideal slope can run $50 to $150 per acre. If extensive re-plumbing is required - for instance, to run laterals along the contours and make mains and control structures accessible along the field edge - costs can go up significantly, he says.


ET Connections

www.irrigation.org [cached]

Don Pitts USDA - NRCS, 1902 Fox Dr., Champaign, IL 61820, Phone (217) 398-5285


Drain Tiling | Midwest Drainage

mwdrainage.com [cached]

"The first step was to drain the land so it was farmable," notes Don Pitts, state water and air quality specialist with the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) in Champaign, Ill. "Now it's time to manage that drainage."


southeastfarmpress.com

This practice - known as drainage water management, or controlled drainage - cuts nitrate loads flowing into surface waters through the tile system, especially during the fallow period, says Don Pitts, a drainage expert for the Natural Resource Conservation Service in Illinois.
And during the growing season, controlled drainage stores moisture and nutrients for the crop, offering the potential for higher yields in dry years, he says. In Illinois, where more than 50 on-farm demonstration systems have been installed, drainage water management has cut tile outflow by 40 percent, Pitts says. Maintaining the water table 2 feet below the surface, rather than the typical 4 feet, retains up to 1.5 inches of additional water in the soil, Pitts says. "This equals about six days' water supply for a corn crop in July, and thus, could have a significant crop production benefit." The cost of controlled drainage depends mainly on the steepness of the field and the size of the tile mains. Retrofitting 81 outlet structures on existing tile systems in Illinois ranged from about $25 per acre on flat sites to more than $250 per acre on sloping fields, Pitts says. Pitts contends that drainage management "is arguably the conservation practice with the highest benefit-to-cost ratio for reducing nitrate loss."


Prinsco - Industry News

www.prinsco.com [cached]

"Many soils within Illinois depend heavily on drainage for economical crop production," said Don Pitts, NRCS Water Quality Specialist/Agricultural Engineer."Our goal is to use it as needed while mitigating the less desirable effects of drainage." Pitts will discuss a new water management system which reduces drainage during times of the year when it is not needed.


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